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WORLD
December 16, 2013 | By Amro Hassan
CAIRO -- South Sudan President Salva Kiir announced an overnight curfew for civilians Monday after what he characterized as a failed coup attempt. Barrages of gunfire broke out at two presidential guard barracks in the capital, Juba, in the early hours of the morning amid suspicions that a coup attempt was triggered by a faction of soldiers loyal to Kiir's former deputy, Riek Machar. Witnesses confirmed that heavy machine guns and mortars were used. Several people were reported wounded, and hundreds of others sought refuge at United Nations facilities in Juba.
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WORLD
January 4, 2014 | By Stephanie Findlay
PRETORIA, South Africa - Face-to-face peace talks between warring parties in South Sudan were stalled Saturday, government officials and rebel delegations said, dashing hopes of a swift end to the bloodshed. Representatives of President Salva Kiir's government and rebels loyal to his former vice president, Riek Machar, began preliminary negotiations through mediators in neighboring Ethiopia on Friday. The talks are seen as a step toward ending the violence that has killed at least 1,000 people, driven tens of thousands from their homes and threatens to plunge the world's newest country into civil war. But a cease-fire appeared to be a long way off Saturday as government and rebel delegations in Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia, reported that direct talks in the Sheraton Hotel had been delayed as the two parties work through the mediators to set a negotiating agenda.
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WORLD
December 21, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - South Sudanese militias fired on two U.S. military aircraft Saturday, wounding four U.S. servicemen, one of them critically, according to American military officials. The two planes were headed to Bor, north of the capital Juba, the main town in the eastern state of Jonglei, which is under the control of a rebel military faction associated with sacked vice president Riek Machar. Intense fighting has been going on in the region as South Sudan's army struggles to take back the town.
WORLD
December 27, 2013 | By Erin Conway-Smith
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - South Sudan's government has agreed to end fighting with rebel forces, East African leaders announced Friday, in a deal that will hinge on whether rebel leader Riek Machar agrees to the truce. At a summit in Nairobi seeking to stop the escalating violence in South Sudan, the government of President Salva Kiir committed itself to an “immediate cessation of hostilities,” a communiqué issued by regional heads of state said. The statement urged Machar to “make similar commitments,” though the former vice president turned rebel is said to have had no representative present for the meetings, and his position remains unclear.
WORLD
December 24, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
The United Nations Security Council voted Tuesday to send 5,000 more troops to South Sudan to tackle a wave of ethnic and political violence that has killed hundreds of people, perhaps thousands, and driven at least 81,000 from their homes. The action by the world body will boost the U.N. troop presence to 12,500, as soon as peacekeepers can be redeployed from other African missions for the temporary buildup. The extra troops, as well as more than 400 more U.N. police, are expected to temporarily transfer to South Sudan from missions in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Darfur region in neighboring Sudan, Ivory Coast and Liberia.
WORLD
January 4, 2014 | By Stephanie Findlay
PRETORIA, South Africa - Face-to-face peace talks between warring parties in South Sudan were stalled Saturday, government officials and rebel delegations said, dashing hopes of a swift end to the bloodshed. Representatives of President Salva Kiir's government and rebels loyal to his former vice president, Riek Machar, began preliminary negotiations through mediators in neighboring Ethiopia on Friday. The talks are seen as a step toward ending the violence that has killed at least 1,000 people, driven tens of thousands from their homes and threatens to plunge the world's newest country into civil war. But a cease-fire appeared to be a long way off Saturday as government and rebel delegations in Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia, reported that direct talks in the Sheraton Hotel had been delayed as the two parties work through the mediators to set a negotiating agenda.
WORLD
December 17, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon and Amro Hassan
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Dozens of soldiers were killed as clashes continued for a second day in the South Sudanese capital of Juba, as more than 13,000 civilians took refuge at a U.N. peacekeepers' base. The fragile state is confronting its greatest crisis since independence in 2011, after clashes erupted late Sunday and President Salva Kiir accused his rival and former deputy, Riek Machar, of launching a coup attempt. Kiir swapped his trademark American cowboy hat for military fatigues when he made Monday's television address.
WORLD
December 27, 2013 | By Erin Conway-Smith
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - South Sudan's government has agreed to end fighting with rebel forces, East African leaders announced Friday, in a deal that will hinge on whether rebel leader Riek Machar agrees to the truce. At a summit in Nairobi seeking to stop the escalating violence in South Sudan, the government of President Salva Kiir committed itself to an “immediate cessation of hostilities,” a communiqué issued by regional heads of state said. The statement urged Machar to “make similar commitments,” though the former vice president turned rebel is said to have had no representative present for the meetings, and his position remains unclear.
WORLD
December 24, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The United Nations said Tuesday that its staffers have found a mass grave in South Sudan, one of at least three reported as fighting, often based on ethnicity, has spread rapidly to half the country's 10 states. "Mass extrajudicial killings, the targeting of individuals on the basis of their ethnicity and arbitrary detentions have been documented in recent days," U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay said in a statement. T he U.N. Security Council was set to vote Tuesday on a proposal to increase its peacekeeping force in South Sudan by 5,000, adding to just over 7,000 uniformed personnel.
WORLD
March 2, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Clashes between militia and local government troops in a southern Sudan town killed at least 57 people and wounded nearly 100, an official said. More than two dozen of those killed in the volatile town of Malakal were civilians, said Riek Machar, vice president of the southern Sudan government. He said the fighting broke out after the arrival of Gen. Gabriel Tang Ginye, a Sudanese army officer who is accused of being involved in bloody clashes in the town in 2006.
WORLD
December 24, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
The United Nations Security Council voted Tuesday to send 5,000 more troops to South Sudan to tackle a wave of ethnic and political violence that has killed hundreds of people, perhaps thousands, and driven at least 81,000 from their homes. The action by the world body will boost the U.N. troop presence to 12,500, as soon as peacekeepers can be redeployed from other African missions for the temporary buildup. The extra troops, as well as more than 400 more U.N. police, are expected to temporarily transfer to South Sudan from missions in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Darfur region in neighboring Sudan, Ivory Coast and Liberia.
WORLD
December 24, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The United Nations said Tuesday that its staffers have found a mass grave in South Sudan, one of at least three reported as fighting, often based on ethnicity, has spread rapidly to half the country's 10 states. "Mass extrajudicial killings, the targeting of individuals on the basis of their ethnicity and arbitrary detentions have been documented in recent days," U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay said in a statement. T he U.N. Security Council was set to vote Tuesday on a proposal to increase its peacekeeping force in South Sudan by 5,000, adding to just over 7,000 uniformed personnel.
WORLD
December 21, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - South Sudanese militias fired on two U.S. military aircraft Saturday, wounding four U.S. servicemen, one of them critically, according to American military officials. The two planes were headed to Bor, north of the capital Juba, the main town in the eastern state of Jonglei, which is under the control of a rebel military faction associated with sacked vice president Riek Machar. Intense fighting has been going on in the region as South Sudan's army struggles to take back the town.
WORLD
December 17, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon and Amro Hassan
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Dozens of soldiers were killed as clashes continued for a second day in the South Sudanese capital of Juba, as more than 13,000 civilians took refuge at a U.N. peacekeepers' base. The fragile state is confronting its greatest crisis since independence in 2011, after clashes erupted late Sunday and President Salva Kiir accused his rival and former deputy, Riek Machar, of launching a coup attempt. Kiir swapped his trademark American cowboy hat for military fatigues when he made Monday's television address.
WORLD
December 16, 2013 | By Amro Hassan
CAIRO -- South Sudan President Salva Kiir announced an overnight curfew for civilians Monday after what he characterized as a failed coup attempt. Barrages of gunfire broke out at two presidential guard barracks in the capital, Juba, in the early hours of the morning amid suspicions that a coup attempt was triggered by a faction of soldiers loyal to Kiir's former deputy, Riek Machar. Witnesses confirmed that heavy machine guns and mortars were used. Several people were reported wounded, and hundreds of others sought refuge at United Nations facilities in Juba.
WORLD
December 19, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Fears of civil war in South Sudan grew Thursday, after South Sudan's military admitted losing control of a key town in the country's east to army mutineers. The army lost Bor, the capital of Jonglei state, to a military faction associated with former Vice President Riek Machar, who has been accused by President Salva Kiir of launching a coup. Fighting continued in the region Thursday. Machar denies any coup attempt, claiming that Kiir is inciting ethnic tensions.
WORLD
December 26, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- African leaders met South Sudanese President Salva Kiir on Thursday as part of an intense international diplomacy effort to brake the country's slide into civil war, as fighting continued in the north of the country. Fighting raged outside Bor, in Jonglei state, recently retaken from rebel forces by the government, and in oil rich Upper Nile state. Thousands are feared dead in 12 days of violence, but many victims are in remote areas, making firm estimates impossible.
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