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Rifaat Assad

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NEWS
June 13, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER and JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As foreign dignitaries and the world's media poured into this insular capital Monday on the eve of President Hafez Assad's state funeral, the first public challenge emerged to the well-oiled plan for passing the mantle of leadership to his son Bashar.
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NEWS
June 13, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER and JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As foreign dignitaries and the world's media poured into this insular capital Monday on the eve of President Hafez Assad's state funeral, the first public challenge emerged to the well-oiled plan for passing the mantle of leadership to his son Bashar.
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NEWS
January 27, 1986 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
King Hussein of Jordan met with Yasser Arafat and the leadership of the Palestine Liberation Organization here Sunday in what could prove to be decisive negotiations that determine the shape of future Middle East peace efforts. The Jordanian monarch and Arafat held two meetings, first with aides to the two men present for talks and a working lunch, then again in the evening for a private discussion that lasted several hours. Hussein and Arafat had not met since November.
NEWS
September 30, 1986 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
The French government, while proclaiming its refusal to negotiate with terrorists, has started to establish contacts with official and private Syrians who may have enough influence to prevent a resumption of the bombing that terrified Paris in mid-September. The government denies that it suspects involvement by the Syrian government in the bombings, which killed nine people and injured more than 160 others in a 10-day siege.
NEWS
February 13, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a time when Israel is furious at Syria for failing to restrain Hezbollah guerrillas in southern Lebanon, to the point of jeopardizing fragile peace negotiations, there are indications that Syrian President Hafez Assad has been cracking down on Islamic militants in his own country. Assad's security forces early last month rounded up hard-line opponents to a proposed peace treaty between Syria and Israel, according to diplomatic sources and other observers here.
NEWS
December 11, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the Arab world, it was a Ramadan surprise--the thunderbolt news that Syria and Israel had decided to resume peace talks after nearly four years of stalemate. Almost nobody in the region had expected anything so sudden or dramatic to come out of Secretary of State Madeleine Albright's tour of the Middle East this week, and Arab analysts were divided over whether the announcement Wednesday of the upcoming talks in Washington meant that Israel or Syria had blinked first.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2000 | ERIC ROULEAU, Eric Rouleau, author and journalist, served as French ambassador to Turkey and Tunisia
Syria is today at a critical crossroads. The death of President Hafez Assad will undoubtedly have far-reaching effects on its domestic and foreign affairs. Admittedly, indulging in predictions is a risky enterprise, particularly in the Middle East. Yet there are obvious factors that are bound to affect Syria's future. In the realm of foreign matters, there are two major problems that the next Syrian president will have to deal with.
WORLD
July 31, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi and Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
Syrian security forces loyal to the embattled regime of President Bashar Assad launched a major military assault on opposition strongholds Sunday, using tanks and gunfire in authorities' latest attempt to crush a pro-democracy movement that appears to be gathering momentum ahead of the emotionally and religiously charged holy month of Ramadan. According to sketchy accounts by activists and residents reached by telephone, Syrian security forces violently attacked several of the country's opposition hotspots, including the southern city of Dara and the far eastern city of Dair Alzour, with the most intense attacks centered on Hama, the country's fourth largest city as well as the site of a 1982 massacre by Assad's father.
NEWS
June 11, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Syria's political hierarchy moved swiftly Saturday to bring about a smooth transfer of power to Bashar Assad after the death of his father, President Hafez Assad. But many analysts believe that the relatively untested 34-year-old could eventually face difficulties in his bid to maintain and extend the Assad legacy.
WORLD
August 1, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi and Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
The months-long standoff between Syria's embattled government and a broad-based opposition movement escalated dramatically when security forces launched simultaneous military attacks in several major cities, instilling anger and fear in an already battered populace just ahead of the emotionally charged month of Ramadan. Security forces opened fire with tanks and machine guns on opposition hot spots across the nation Sunday, including areas near the southern city of Dara, where the uprising began 4 1/2 months ago, and in the far eastern city of Dair Alzour.
OPINION
December 8, 1991 | Robin Wright, Robin Wright, national-security correspondent for The Times, is author of "In the Name of God: The Khomeini Decade" (Simon & Schuster)
It started in 1979 almost as a political lark. Worried that their revolution was unraveling just 10 months after the shah's ouster, some 80 Iranian students, mainly from Tehran's Polytechnique University, plotted to stage a sit-in at the U.S. Embassy.
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