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Rift

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OPINION
December 24, 2013 | By Haim Saban
In recent weeks, the media have had a field day reporting on a so-called rift in the U.S.-Israel relationship over the nuclear negotiations with Iran. The story makes for great headlines, but it's poor analysis. Despite the heated rhetoric, the pillars that have anchored America's most important alliance in the Middle East for more than six decades are just as firmly rooted today as they have ever been. Just hours after Secretary of State John F. Kerry announced the interim deal to halt Iran's nuclear program, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu appeared on American television and called the agreement "a historic mistake.
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NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Chris Feliciano Arnold, guest blogger
When Mark Zuckerberg describes his company's $2-billion purchase of Oculus VR, makers of the Oculus Rift virtual reality headset, he sounds like a cross between a Zen master and a grandpa encouraging us whippersnappers to spend more time outside. “By feeling truly present, you can share unbounded spaces and experiences with the people in your life,” the Facebook founder and CEO said in a post about the Oculus acquisition last week. “Imagine sharing not just moments with your friends online but entire experiences and adventures.” Yet for Facebook and Oculus, “experiences and adventures” mean deepening our gaze into their network, immersing ourselves in a sensation that will one day be so indistinguishable from reality that developers describe it as “presence,” an effect unique to the new medium, as magical as “live” television must once have seemed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2010 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
A bruising turf battle that pits City of Hope National Medical Center against the organization that provides most of its doctors has created a rift at the prestigious cancer treatment and research complex northeast of Los Angeles. The controversy — centering on a reorganization of hospital operations — has yielded dueling lawsuits, a doctors' "loss of confidence" vote against chief executive Dr. Michael A. Friedman and public pleas for support to lawmakers and patients.
WORLD
March 27, 2014 | By Christi Parsons, Kathleen Hennessey and Laura King
ROME - After spending four days in Europe dealing with the crisis over Russia's annexation of Crimea, President Obama now turns to a diplomatic challenge of another sort: trying to smooth relations with Saudi Arabia without making the longtime U.S. ally seem like an afterthought. Obama is scheduled to arrive in Riyadh, the Saudi capital, shortly before sunset Friday to meet with King Abdullah, whose inner circle is riled by how the United States has handled Iran's nuclear ambitions and Syria's civil war. Some with close ties to the royal family have talked about breaking ranks with Western partners.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1989 | From United Press International
Commerce Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher on Wednesday vehemently denied the existence of a rift within the Bush Administration over trade policy toward Japan. Mosbacher, in remarks to the Society of American Business Editors and Writers, was responding to reports that two camps had emerged within the Administration over how to respond to trade barriers imposed by the Japanese. According to published reports, Mosbacher's and U.S. Trade Representative Carla Anderson Hills' hard-line stance was at odds with a more diplomatic approach favored by Secretary of State James A. Baker III, Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady and White House economic adviser Michael J. Boskin.
SPORTS
November 9, 2008 | Associated Press
Mike D'Antoni's run with the Phoenix Suns ended with the perception that he wasn't getting along with his boss. So he wouldn't stand for people thinking his tenure with the New York Knicks started the same way. D'Antoni reacted quickly this week after learning of speculation in some New York papers that he and team president Donnie Walsh weren't seeing eye to eye over the benching of point guard Stephon Marbury. "There will never be a rift between Donnie and I. ... That's not going to happen," D'Antoni said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2009 | Mike Boehm
The heirs of George and Ira Gershwin, creators of "I Got Rhythm" and many other standards that helped define the grand tradition of American popular song, have fallen badly out of step over who gets how much from the lucrative pot of royalties still being generated 72 years after George's death ended songwriting's greatest brother act. The dispute -- over how to divide foreign royalties -- is spelled out in lawsuits in separate Los Angeles courts....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1999
Geology 1: Quakes lift; crusts rift; oceans shift; continents drift. HARRY LEVIN Woodland Hills
OPINION
October 27, 2005
Re "The rift on the right that isn't," Opinion, Oct. 26 Max Boot says that the current conservative dissenters to the Bush war in Iraq supported it going in. This is true, but they did so based on fabricated intelligence of weapons of mass destruction. Had they not been victims of a lie, they likely would not have been supporters of the war. It is absurd to claim this does not constitute a rift. CHARLES ZIGMUND Pleasantville, N.Y. With headlines and articles abounding highlighting dissension within the ranks of the Republican base on myriad issues from Iraq to Harriet Miers, Boot has done the only thing he can do: reframe the argument.
OPINION
December 31, 2001
Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia helps appoint him president, so Bush pays him back by finding his son a well-paid government job ("Bush Risks Rift With Senate Over Recess Appointments," Dec. 22). I'm so glad the honor of the presidency has been restored. Scott McKenzie La Canada
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2014 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Huber Matos Benitez, whose disenchantment with the Cuban Revolution he had helped lead brought him the wrath of Fidel Castro and 20 years in prison, died Thursday in Miami after a heart attack. He was 95. His death was confirmed by his grandson, Huber Matos Garsault. In 1952 Matos was a teacher and rice farmer in his early 30s when Gen. Fulgencio Batista led a coup that overthrew democratically elected President Carlos Prio Socarras. Hoping to restore democracy to his country, Matos took up arms against Batista's forces.
WORLD
February 27, 2014 | By Raja Abdulrahim
The sacking last week of the commander of the Free Syrian Army appears to be driving a wedge among factions of the loosely organized Western-backed network of rebel forces at a crucial moment in the three-year civil war to oust Syrian President Bashar Assad. The rift, analysts and rebels say, could undermine efforts to redirect Western support to rebels in southern Syria as part of a strategy to bolster the opposition there to counter the growing power of Islamist and Al Qaeda affiliates in the north.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
For the first time in a long time, it didn't snow in Park City, Utah, during the Sundance Film Festival, not even a flurry. The barren hills surrounding the town provided a physical echo of a festival that was not overflowing with greatness either. But, paradoxically, experiencing Sundance in an off year highlighted some of the things that make the festival so valuable. If you just looked at the awards list, it might seem that 2014 was very good indeed. Damien Chazelle's "Whiplash" won both the Grand Jury Prize and the audience award for U.S. drama, and the festival's various entities liked the films on offer so much that a full 25 features went home with awards.
OPINION
December 24, 2013 | By Haim Saban
In recent weeks, the media have had a field day reporting on a so-called rift in the U.S.-Israel relationship over the nuclear negotiations with Iran. The story makes for great headlines, but it's poor analysis. Despite the heated rhetoric, the pillars that have anchored America's most important alliance in the Middle East for more than six decades are just as firmly rooted today as they have ever been. Just hours after Secretary of State John F. Kerry announced the interim deal to halt Iran's nuclear program, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu appeared on American television and called the agreement "a historic mistake.
NATIONAL
December 3, 2013 | By Alana Semuels and Michael Muskal
After a federal judge ruled Tuesday that Detroit was eligible for bankruptcy protection and cleared the way for municipal pensions to be cut, city officials were upbeat, called for unity and urged residents to look ahead with optimism. But for the city's employee unions, whose members, current and retired, are likely to face benefit reductions, the decision signaled the start of a new legal round - their appeal of the ruling to a higher court. The disparate reactions were symptomatic of what lies ahead for Detroit.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli and Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - In a closed-door meeting on Wednesday, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) listed the beliefs he said united Republicans, urging them not to "confuse tactics with principles. " "The differences between us are dwarfed by the differences we have with the Democratic Party," he declared. But in the Capitol's halls, as bruised and defeated Republicans discussed what had befallen them, those internal divisions seemed only to widen. "It's pretty hard when we have a circle of 20 people who stand up every day and say, 'Can we surrender today, Mr. Speaker?
NEWS
December 30, 1985 | United Press International
Syrian President Hafez Assad opened talks today with Jordan's King Hussein, crowning Saudi Arabia's efforts to end a 6-year-old rift between the two nations, Damascus radio said. The two leaders, accompanied by Syrian Prime Minister Abdel-Raouf Kasm and his Jordanian counterpart, Zaid Rifai, began their discussions on Middle East developments at the Guest Palace in Damascus, the Syrian capital.
NEWS
June 1, 2006
Re "Strong Signs of Rift Among Democrats," May 27 What "rift"? Democratic voters are strongly united against the Iraq war, among other policy failures of this reactionary presidency. If there is a rift, it is between frustrated Democratic voters and Democrats in name only, such as Sen. Joe Lieberman of Connecticut. They have, over the last three years, reliably voted to support this president's disastrous policies in Iraq as well as a number of his horrendous appointments. Even as President Bush's approval ratings dip below 35%, these individuals cannot seem to muster the courage to consistently vote the will of their increasingly furious constituency.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Scott Collins, This post has been updated. See note below for details.
In the battle of Magic Johnson versus Bill Simmons, a winner has emerged - and the former Lakers star is leaving ESPN. Johnson said Thursday that he feels a "strong connection" to the sports network but that he has other priorities that will keep him from continuing in his role as an NBA analyst for the season that begins Oct. 29th.  "I love ESPN," Johnson wrote in a statement. "Unfortunately, due to the nature of my schedule and other commitments, I don't feel confident that I can continue to devote the time needed to thrive in my role.
WORLD
September 29, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Amro Hassan
CAIRO - One aunt cursed him to hell, another accused him of murder. The intense family passions were roused when Ahmed Samir posted on Facebook his support for Egypt's deadly crackdown against the Muslim Brotherhood. The proclamation drew Samir and his irate relatives deeper into the nation's battles over politics and conscience after nearly three years of unrest. "My one aunt calls me a liar and prays for me to go to hell. She says I am covered with blood of those who were killed," said Samir, a customer relations representative for a bank.
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