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Right Of Way

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1989
I am in favor of fixed-rail transit, having been in L.A. since 1920. With reference to the possible purchase of facilities from Santa Fe and Southern Pacific, let me suggest a little investigation. I suspect that those right-of-way were grants without cost to the railroads. If such is the case, wouldn't it be nice if the railroads just turned them over to the people at the same cost? Or a 99-year lease at $1.00 per year would be nice. A .I. WORTSMAN Van Nuys
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NATIONAL
March 10, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court dealt a setback Monday to the popular redevelopment trend of transforming abandoned railroad lines into public bike paths, ruling that buyers of such lands are not required to continue granting a federal right of way. Legal experts said the decision would make it harder to build bike or hiking trails in areas of the West where railroads were often built on former federal land. In some instances, local governments may be forced to pay compensation to owners whose land is now crossed by bike paths or other government-built trails and parks.
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NEWS
October 16, 1986
On Sept. 25 approximately 300 concerned residents were given the opportunity to comment on plans to develop approximately 25 acres of railroad-controlled land in Hermosa Beach. Based on available printed documentation and citizen testimony, it can be safely concluded that: (1) The Santa Fe Co. will not donate this property to the city for recreational use. (2) The proposed plan for the right of way development will not improve the quality of life for Hermosa Beach residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2013 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
Around the corner from the bustle and roar of Broadway's Jewelry District in downtown L.A., a quiet alley serves as a respite for locals and tourists. Shops and restaurants with colorful awnings and peeling brick facades present a kitschy, Old World scene, complete with a potbellied chef statue, and a Marilyn Monroe perched in a pink Cadillac. On most days, a group of Armenian men can be spotted hunched over a backgammon board, shrouded in cigarette smoke. But the fate of St. Vincent's Court - a California historical landmark - has been thrown into question after a complaint prompted a city crackdown on outdoor seating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2009 | Steve Hymon
The existing rail right-of-way through West Los Angeles would attract more riders to the Expo Line and cost less, according to a new environmental study released Wednesday on the proposed light-rail project between Culver City and Santa Monica. The study looked at two routes through the area -- one using the right-of-way and the other using Venice and Sepulveda boulevards. The right-of-way cuts through residential neighborhoods, and some homeowners have expressed concerns over both the safety and traffic effects of putting the commuter rail line at street level in that area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1997 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Changes in the municipal code will allow the city to handle right-of-way problems without having to file public nuisance complaints. The City Council voted this week for the changes, which officials said will make it easier to prod residents to trim shrubs and trees on land that falls within the city's right of way. Under the changed code, the city can notify property owners by letter of such problems.
OPINION
February 9, 2009
Re "A win for wilderness," editorial, Feb. 4 The Times unfairly called one provision of the omnibus public lands bill, allowing a road to be built through the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, "troubling." In fact, this would be a win-win for all concerned. This road would be a lifesaving link for the mostly indigenous residents of the area facing medical emergencies. The federal government would receive 61,000 acres of pristine habitat in exchange for a small right-of-way road that would take up 206 acres.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1990
I applaud Zane for his position of resurrecting old railroad rights-of-way to be used for light-rail transit. There is no better time for the County Transportation Commission to purchase these rail lines than now, especially when Los Angeles' mounting transportation problems are so obvious. Failure to buy the offered rail lines now might mean that the city would have to purchase land in the future--and for a much higher price. Los Angeles made one of its biggest transportation mistakes by letting go of the Pacific Electric Red Cars lines back in the '50s and early '60s.
NEWS
July 26, 1992
The western segment of the Santa Monica Boulevard right of way is about to get a face lift. Los Angeles County Supervisor Ed Edelman and Los Angeles City Council members Ruth Galanter and Zev Yaroslavsky were on hand Wednesday to kick off the beautification project for the railroad right of way. Members of the California Conservation Corps will spruce up the area between the San Diego Freeway and Century City by clearing away weeds and garbage and keeping it clean.
REAL ESTATE
May 8, 1988
Paul A. Widrig, senior title officer, city of Los Angeles, has been elected president of the Los Angeles chapter of the International Right of Way Assn. Other new officers are Gary L. Peck, Southern California Edison Co., president-elect; Kathy L. Friedman, Los Angeles Unified School District, first vice president; Sharon O'Rourke, Southern California Gas Co., secretary-treasurer; Rob Shultz, Exxon Co. USA, second vice president and Maria Elliott, Southern California Gas Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2013 | By Alene Tchekmedyian, Los Angeles Times
The brightly colored vans advertising "Topless Maids $99" caused a stir in Burbank last year when they were seen parked on city streets for days on end, prompting officials to publicly denounce them as eyesores and visual blight. Last week, the City Council voted to ban vehicles whose main purpose is advertising. There are some exemptions, such as pizza and mail delivery vehicles. "What we're capturing with this ordinance is those signs that are bolted to a van, leaned against a van, trailers that are unhitched and left in the public right of way," Deputy City Planner Patrick Prescott said at Tuesday's meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2011 | By Mark Kellam, Los Angeles Times
A handful of residents living along a busy stretch of Glendale Avenue say city officials are forcing them to take down mirrors they've attached to trees in the public right-of-way so they can better see oncoming traffic while exiting their driveways. The residents, who live north of the Ventura Freeway, say that in the absence of any speed-reduction enhancements — such as humps — the convex mirrors are one of the few safety measures they have. City officials, though, say the mirrors aren't allowed on city-owned trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2011 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
Go ahead, play in the street. So say organizers of CicLAvia , an event Sunday that allows bicyclists, skateboarders, pedestrians and rollerbladers — second-class citizens in this car-dependent city — to dominate nearly eight miles of Los Angeles' streets. The ciclovia, which means bicycle path in Spanish, began in Bogota, Colombia, several decades ago in response to pollution and street congestion. Instead of driving elsewhere for entertainment, residents were invited to use the street as their playground.
NEWS
April 26, 2009 | Lisa Rathke, Rathke writes for the Associated Press.
The black salamander with yellow spots sat on the roadside in the dark, ready to make a go of it. But it was not on its own. It got help from an escort -- one of 45 people who volunteered on a recent night to carry salamanders, frogs and newts across the road during their annual migration to mate. On rainy nights in early spring, roads between forests and vernal pools are hopping and crawling with activity. On some nights, hundreds of amphibians cross small stretches of asphalt to mate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2009 | Martha Groves
In a victory for environmentalists and many traffic-weary residents, the Exposition Construction Authority board has voted to use the existing railroad right-of-way along Exposition Boulevard to extend the rail line from Culver City to Santa Monica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2009 | Steve Hymon
Of the many issues facing the six candidates in the 5th District City Council race in Los Angeles, none is potentially thornier than the routing of the proposed Expo Line light rail. Should the train run along the old rail right-of-way that cuts through several residential neighborhoods between the 10 Freeway and Pico Boulevard? And, if so, should the train cross busy north-south streets or go under or over them?
REAL ESTATE
March 8, 1987
E. (Ray) Jackson, supervisor of leases and franchises for Unocal, has been elected 1987 president of Los Angeles Chapter No. 1, International Right of Way Assn., succeeding H. J. (Skip) Dearing of the Metropolitan Water District. Other new officers are Paul Widrig, city of Los Angeles, president-elect; Gary L. Peck, Southern California Edison Co., first vice president; Kathryn L. Friedman, Los Angeles Unified School District, secretary-treasurer; Sharon O'Rourke, Southern California Gas Co.
OPINION
February 9, 2009
Re "A win for wilderness," editorial, Feb. 4 The Times unfairly called one provision of the omnibus public lands bill, allowing a road to be built through the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, "troubling." In fact, this would be a win-win for all concerned. This road would be a lifesaving link for the mostly indigenous residents of the area facing medical emergencies. The federal government would receive 61,000 acres of pristine habitat in exchange for a small right-of-way road that would take up 206 acres.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2009 | Steve Hymon
The existing rail right-of-way through West Los Angeles would attract more riders to the Expo Line and cost less, according to a new environmental study released Wednesday on the proposed light-rail project between Culver City and Santa Monica. The study looked at two routes through the area -- one using the right-of-way and the other using Venice and Sepulveda boulevards. The right-of-way cuts through residential neighborhoods, and some homeowners have expressed concerns over both the safety and traffic effects of putting the commuter rail line at street level in that area.
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