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Right To Assemble

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NEWS
July 4, 1998 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't be misled by the dope smoking, the incessant drumming, the incense haze and the twirling dancers. This is nothing less than a Constitutional Convention, a referendum on the right to assemble. To many, the 27th Gathering of the Tribes for World Peace and Healing is a freaky, funky, smelly assemblage of anarchists, Druids, tree-worshiping Pagans and latter-day hippies. They call it Weirdstock.
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WORLD
September 1, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
A day after Prime Minister Vladimir Putin suggested that protesters who gather routinely in central Moscow should "have a club on the head," riot police on Tuesday broke up a crowd of about 2,000 opposition supporters and onlookers and arrested scores of people. The clash was part of a ritual that has seen demonstrators gather on the 31st day of the month in Triumfalnaya Square to press for the right of free assembly as enshrined in Article 31 of the Russian Constitution. "Permission from local authorities is needed" for a demonstration, Putin said in an interview published Monday by Kommersant, a popular daily newspaper.
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WORLD
September 1, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
A day after Prime Minister Vladimir Putin suggested that protesters who gather routinely in central Moscow should "have a club on the head," riot police on Tuesday broke up a crowd of about 2,000 opposition supporters and onlookers and arrested scores of people. The clash was part of a ritual that has seen demonstrators gather on the 31st day of the month in Triumfalnaya Square to press for the right of free assembly as enshrined in Article 31 of the Russian Constitution. "Permission from local authorities is needed" for a demonstration, Putin said in an interview published Monday by Kommersant, a popular daily newspaper.
NEWS
July 4, 1998 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't be misled by the dope smoking, the incessant drumming, the incense haze and the twirling dancers. This is nothing less than a Constitutional Convention, a referendum on the right to assemble. To many, the 27th Gathering of the Tribes for World Peace and Healing is a freaky, funky, smelly assemblage of anarchists, Druids, tree-worshiping Pagans and latter-day hippies. They call it Weirdstock.
OPINION
November 3, 1991
Not only has Wilson outraged fair-minded people in California with his vetoes of the gay employment bill and the sexual harassment bill, but he and the LAPD want to deny citizens the right to peacefully assemble to redress their government. I speak of the police actions at the protest on Oct. 23 at the Century Plaza Hotel. Not only were people denied the right to assemble on the public sidewalk in front of the hotel, but the police ordered them from the median where no one was doing anything but reminding people of Wilson's veto and the call for his recall from office.
OPINION
March 29, 1987
Exciting headlines announcing the release of Soviet dissidents won't mean anything until the Soviet system of justice itself changes, guaranteeing free speech, the right to assemble and other civil rights. When Soviet dissidents are released they can be detained again at government whim. Meanwhile, dissidents serve sometimes as "window dressing" to win concessions from the West when their release is announced. The "good news" is applauded around the world, often distracting attention from unpalatable Soviet actions taking place elsewhere.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ford Motor Co. announced plans to sell its heavy-duty truck business to Freightliner Corp. as it continues to refocus on cars and light trucks. Terms of the deal, which is subject to regulatory approval, were not disclosed. Heavy-duty trucks represented about 0.5% of Dearborn, Mich.-based Ford's 1996 sales, and the market overall has been flat. Portland, Ore.
OPINION
May 2, 2006
Re "Injunction Has Community Feeling Handcuffed," April 28 Gang injunctions are unconstitutional and need to be abolished. The 1st Amendment guarantees the right to peaceably assemble. These injunctions clearly infringe on that right. Furthermore, some of the people who are being issued injunctions aren't even gang members. (Not that injunctions would be justified if that weren't the case.) Preventing crime doesn't justify violating peoples' constitutional rights. And if eliminating gang injunctions means more crime, so be it -- nobody ever said freedom was free.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1997
Re "Contrasts Mark Hernandez's Council Return," Oct. 6: As a teacher at St. Thomas the Apostle, the school that had students go to support Councilman Mike Hernandez's return, I was curious of the use of the phrase, in describing the students' trip to City Hall, "who skipped morning classes." Why the word "skipped"? To me, it comes across in a negative way. We took the students to City Hall to show support for Hernandez's return and to send a message that Hernandez has been a good councilman for the 1st District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2001
Democracy, it seems, is a more fragile thing in the U.S. than we might hope. Many pundits and letter writers have vehemently denied that protesters against administration policy have a right to speak; James Pinkerton (Commentary, Oct. 2) smugly writes about how "the police, dressed in full body armor, were ready for a rumble" at a demonstration, and applauds as they break up a peaceful and legitimate rally. When we affirm what is positive about our nation, it is most fundamentally our constitutional democracy and its bedrock Bill of Rights, which were won and have been maintained by hard struggle, despite efforts to subvert them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1990
The Fifth Amendment states that U.S. citizens are guaranteed the right to liberty (freedom from external control of interference). The First Amendment states that the people have freedom of speech (including the right to assemble peaceably). American flag burning is an example of assembling peaceably and exercising the freedom from interference (such as an anti-flag burning law). The people for the anti-U.S. flag burning law are hypocritical.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2001 | Bloomberg News
A federal judge has dismissed a class-action suit accusing No. 1 online advertiser DoubleClick Inc. of violating consumers' privacy rights by collecting information on their Web-surfing habits. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Naomi Buchwald in New York is a major victory for Internet marketers, at least temporarily establishing a precedent upholding their right to assemble user profiles for targeting online ads.
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