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NEWS
December 15, 1988 | PHYLLIS THEROUX
On Feb. 6, a baby boy was born, six weeks premature, at Sibley Hospital in Washington. His mother had been hospitalized during her pregnancy twice before--once for dehydration and again for very early labor--and the delivering obstetrician was on the lookout for more trouble. He got it. The baby didn't breathe properly and after a brief examination, he ordered him immediately transferred by ambulance to Georgetown Hospital's high-tech Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. He needed the best of care.
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NATIONAL
May 14, 2013 | By Michael Mello
Vermont is on track to become the fourth state to allow severely ill patients to end their lives under medical supervision. The state's House of Representatives voted 75 to 65 on Monday night to approve the “Patient Choice at End of Life” measure. The legislation, passed by the Senate in February, now goes to Gov. Peter Shumlin, who said he would sign it. If he does, it will make Vermont the first state to approve such a measure through state lawmakers. Oregon and Washington enacted their laws through a referendum, and a Montana Supreme Court decision made it legal in that state.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1990
I believe that Bill Bolte, a middle-aged disabled person, is dreaming about dragons that do not exist in his fear that anybody will ever seek the elimination of disabled persons who do not want to die. The entire point of right-to-die advocates is individual freedom of choice. We have no desire to advise others. We do not believe that Dr. Kevorkian should be tried for developing his suicide machine and allowing Janet Adkins to use it. (A judge threw out the murder charge against Kevorkian on Dec. 13)
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Perhaps the only thing more surprising than the news that Belgium allowed the euthanasia of twin brothers who were deaf and going blind is how many commenters appear to favor this event and wish for similar laws in the United States. USA Today and various other sources report that the 45-year-old brothers had been close companions all their lives and lived in the same house. According to a family member, they were distraught at the idea that blindness would rob them of their independence, did not want to live in any kind of assisted-living facility and were horrified by the thought that they would never see each other again -- which would also make communication difficult, at least at first.
NEWS
June 25, 1987
The New Jersey Supreme Court broadly expanded the right-to-die guidelines it first laid down in the Karen Quinlan case, ruling that the wishes of a comatose or terminally ill person to refuse artificial life-support must be respected.
NATIONAL
February 14, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A Florida appeals court said a lawsuit over whether a brain-damaged woman should be kept on life support must be reopened to consider more testimony. The ruling, which overturns a decision by the judge overseeing the highly publicized right-to-die case, is a victory for the parents of Theresa "Terri" Schiavo, 40. The suit challenges a law that ordered Schiavo's feeding tube reinserted six days after it had been removed at the request of her husband and legal guardian, Michael Schiavo.
NEWS
November 14, 1999 | From Associated Press
Right-to-die activists from around the world convened here Saturday to discuss and demonstrate do-it-yourself suicide devices--such as the "expirator" and the "debreather"--that bypass doctors and legislatures. Moderates in the right-to-die movement boycotted the two-day meeting, saying assisted suicide should remain within medical and legal bounds.
NEWS
April 21, 1988 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
A proposed initiative to permit doctor-assisted mercy killings, which appears to be falling short of qualifying for the state ballot, was opposed by Los Angeles Catholic, Protestant, Jewish and Muslim religious leaders in a joint statement issued Wednesday. The statement said the proposal poses a threat to "the generally accepted mores of society." Signers included Roman Catholic Archbishop Roger M.
NEWS
May 23, 1988 | MYRNA OLIVER
Elizabeth Bouvia, the paralyzed woman who once went to court for the right to starve herself to death under hospital care, is alive and reasonably well and living in a tiny cell-like isolation room at County-USC Medical Center. She lost her 1983 Riverside Superior Court fight to starve herself, but when she later moved to Los Angeles, she established case law asserting a patient's right to control her treatment regardless of age, health or motives.
NEWS
November 6, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A historic ballot proposition that would legalize euthanasia for the terminally ill of Washington state and a term-limit initiative both trailed in election returns Tuesday night and were projected to fail. The term-limit initiative sought a quick end to the careers of U.S. House Speaker Thomas S. Foley and a hundred other senior politicians in Washington state. With slightly more than half the vote counted, the initiative was trailing 53% to 47%, and the Associated Press predicted its defeat.
NATIONAL
October 7, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
A terminally ill New York woman fought her religious parents in court for the right to die on her own terms, going so far as to say, “I want to die.” Now she's changed her mind. Grace Sung Eun Lee, 28, was a New York City financial manager until she developed a brain tumor that put her in the hospital Sept. 3. The doctors put her on life support at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y., to keep her alive, but after a while, she wanted off. That put her on a collision course with her highly conservative parents, Manho Lee and Jin-ah Lee, who believe she would go to hell if she chose to die. "When someone sets a date and time to die, that is suicide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2011 | By Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from El Cajon, Calif. -- Sharlotte Hydorn peddles a product touted for its deadly simplicity. Inside her butterfly-decorated boxes are clear plastic bags and medical-grade tubing. A customer places the bag over his head, connects the tubing from the bag to a helium tank, turns the valve and breathes. The so-called suicide kit asphyxiates a customer within minutes. Orders come from all over the world, from people young and old, depressed and terminally ill. "People commit suicide by jumping out of windows and buildings, and hanging themselves," said the 91-year-old former elementary school science teacher.
OPINION
August 11, 2008
In the course of treating a patient, there may come a point when the physician says, "I've done all I can. It's out of my hands." The patient may then ask about end-of-life options -- not life-ending options, but end-of-life options, such as palliative care focused on making the patient as comfortable as possible during the final illness.
OPINION
June 29, 2008
Re "A personal battle over right to die," June 22 If the issue of assisted suicide was simply about autonomy, personal choice and respect, then it would be an easy call: Let the terminally ill die with dignity. Unfortunately, other influences could affect this choice. Insurance companies could have an incentive to "assist" terminally ill patients end their suffering. It is no doubt cheaper to prescribe a lethal dose of barbiturates than to manage a patient's suffering for months or years.
NATIONAL
June 22, 2008 | Stuart Glascock, Times Staff Writer
A looming battle in Washington state over efforts to create a right-to-die law for the terminally ill is a personal one for two men leading it, both of whom are ill. Fighting for the measure is a former governor who wants the freedom to exercise such a right; fighting against it is a former press secretary who can't imagine anyone wanting to. Proponents are wrapping up a petition drive to put Initiative 1000, the proposed Washington Death With Dignity Act, on the November ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2007 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
Despite the efforts of Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez, legislation to allow terminally ill people to hasten their deaths was shelved Thursday for lack of support. Certain they didn't have the votes to pass it, the bill's authors in effect killed it, at least until January, by not bringing it up for a vote on the Assembly floor. Nunez, a Los Angeles Democrat, co-wrote the bill, to the consternation of Cardinal Roger M. Mahony and other Catholic leaders.
NEWS
December 29, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A woman who committed suicide left $32,000 to a right-to-die foundation to spread a pro-choice philosophy she said should operate "from womb to tomb." Lilian Stevens, who helped establish the My Choice organization she endowed, killed herself last July while in rapidly failing health.
NEWS
November 26, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The state must reimburse $13,000 in legal costs to a woman who was challenged by Gov. James S. Gilmore when she tried to remove the feeding tube from her severely brain-damaged husband, a judge ruled. Circuit Judge Frank Hoss Jr. agreed with lawyers for Michele Finn, who contended that Gilmore exceeded his authority when he tried to prevent her from allowing Hugh Finn to die. Finn, 44, died Oct. 9 in a Manassas, Va.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2007 | George Skelton
Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez announced in February that he was "ready to buck my church" and push legislation allowing terminally ill people to speed up their deaths with lethal drugs. But he wasn't ready for this -- not from holy leaders. The church is bucking back and looking like an ugly old political attack dog. We're seeing a collision of church and state, both of which serve society best -- with all our religious diversity -- when they operate separately. As the nation's founders planned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2007 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
Calling himself a "Johnny-come-lately" to the issue, Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez announced Thursday that he will back a bill to allow terminally ill people to hasten their deaths with lethal prescriptions. Similar bills have failed in the last two years, but supporters say Nunez, a Los Angeles Democrat, could make the difference. "We are more hopeful now than ever that we can get this bill signed into law," said the bill's author, Assemblywoman Patty Berg (D-Eureka).
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