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Right To Die

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001 | MAURA DOLAN and BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The wife of a man whose life became the subject of a closely watched right-to-die case asked the California Supreme Court on Wednesday to issue a ruling despite her husband's death this week. "I would hope that families wouldn't have to go through what we went through," Rose Wendland, Robert Wendland's legal conservator, said at a news conference in Stockton.
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NEWS
October 5, 1996 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Theresa de Vera, 21, had been in a deep coma for six weeks after a severe asthma attack that stopped her breathing. A tube inserted into her stomach fed her, a hissing ventilator breathed for her, IV lines dripped antibiotics into her bloodstream. It was Memorial Day weekend, and Theresa's mother and brother were at her side in an intensive care ward at Glendale Adventist Medical Center.
NATIONAL
July 27, 2004 | From Associated Press
A brain-damaged woman kept alive for years over the objection of her husband has been "stripped of her most intimate personal rights," his lawyer said in papers filed Monday with the state Supreme Court. Michael Schiavo, the husband of Terri Schiavo, has sued Gov. Jeb Bush over "Terri's Law," a measure Bush pushed through the Legislature in October after Schiavo removed the feeding tube keeping his wife alive.
NEWS
December 27, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Nancy Cruzan, a 33-year-old automobile crash victim who remained comatose for nearly eight years as a landmark right-to-die case involving her went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, died Wednesday in southwestern Missouri. Cruzan died at the Missouri Rehabilitation Center in Mt. Vernon with her family at her bedside and about 20 "right-to-life" protesters huddled in sub-zero temperatures outside.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Propped up in her hospital bed, Elizabeth Bouvia is agonizing over the suicide last month of her longtime friend and attorney, Richard Scott. "Jesus, I wish he could have come in and taken me with him. But he wasn't thinking of me. . . ." For almost a decade, Scott led the high-profile fight to give Bouvia, paralyzed since birth by cerebral palsy, the right to starve to death. The issue, he once said, was simple: "Whose life is it, anyway?" In early August, Scott, 54, answered his own question.
NATIONAL
June 22, 2008 | Stuart Glascock, Times Staff Writer
A looming battle in Washington state over efforts to create a right-to-die law for the terminally ill is a personal one for two men leading it, both of whom are ill. Fighting for the measure is a former governor who wants the freedom to exercise such a right; fighting against it is a former press secretary who can't imagine anyone wanting to. Proponents are wrapping up a petition drive to put Initiative 1000, the proposed Washington Death With Dignity Act, on the November ballot.
NEWS
April 8, 1994 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The physician-assisted suicide of Canada's leading advocate of the "right to die" has triggered a new national debate on euthanasia and dramatically improved chances for legislation that would protect doctors who aid in the consensual death of a patient.
NEWS
July 25, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past five years, defense attorney Michael K. Brady has been trying to keep accused murderers from going to the gas chamber. But now he has a new role: making sure his client is executed 30 days from today. The pugnacious Sacramento lawyer is representing convicted killer David Edwin Mason, who has decided to drop his remaining legal appeals and allow his death sentence to be carried out.
NEWS
March 18, 1997 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The proverbial slippery slope, so often invoked as abstract concept in right-to-die bioethics debates, has loomed large and quite tangible on the Oregon horizon these past months. What follows once you allow physician-assisted suicide?
NATIONAL
March 10, 2005 | From Associated Press
Florida's social services agency and Republican state lawmakers acted on two fronts Wednesday to block the March 18 removal of a feeding tube for a woman at the center of a contentious right-to-die case.
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