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Right To Die

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2006 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
In a hushed hearing room packed with hundreds of people, a single state senator on Tuesday derailed the second attempt to legalize assisted suicide in California. Before he cast the deciding vote against a measure that would have allowed people with less than six months to live to get a lethal prescription, Sen. Joe Dunn (D-Santa Ana) said he feared such a law would eventually be expanded.
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NATIONAL
March 27, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Michael Schiavo's book about the fight to let his brain-damaged wife die, called "Terri: The Truth," is to be released today, the day before a book by Terri Schiavo's parents, Bob and Mary Schindler, "A Life That Matters: The Legacy of Terri Schiavo, a Lesson For Us All," is released. Friday will be the first anniversary of Terri Schiavo's death, 13 days after her feeding tube was removed.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2006 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
"What do you do for exercise?" asks Booth Gardner, and it's not long before the 69-year-old former governor of Washington is sharing tales of marathons run and mountains climbed. But soon this lanky, bearded man with a trademark gruff style turns to his latest and perhaps last campaign, one that has abruptly put him back in the public eye and to which he brings a perspective full of both psychic and physical pain. Gardner is campaigning for the right to die.
NATIONAL
March 10, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
In the first report on assisted suicide since the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the landmark state law, there was little change in the number of terminally ill patients who asked their doctors for a lethal dose of medication. The report, released in Portland, showed 38 people in 2005 ended their lives under the Oregon Death With Dignity Act, which went into effect in 1998. It was nearly the same number as 2004, when 37 people asked their physicians for a lethal prescription.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2006 | Robert Salladay and Jordan Rau, Times Staff Writers
In a blow to California lawmakers attempting to legalize doctorassisted suicide this year, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said Tuesday that such a momentous decision is better left to voters rather than to elected officials. Thirteen years ago, California rejected an initiative that sought to let a doctor supervise the death of a critically ill patient. But with the U.S.
NATIONAL
January 18, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court rejected the Bush administration's challenge to the nation's only right-to-die law Tuesday, ruling that then-Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft had overstepped his authority when he sought to punish Oregon doctors who helped terminally ill patients end their lives. The 6-3 decision was a victory for states and their independent-minded voters, and a defeat for social conservatives. The case also showed Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2006 | Jordan Rau, Times Staff Writer
California advocates of assisted suicide said Tuesday's Supreme Court ruling erased a significant legal objection to their campaign, but the ethical qualms of wavering lawmakers remain a substantial obstacle to approval this year. "It obviously paves the way for state action," said Dario Frommer (D-Glendale), the Assembly majority leader, who has not decided how he will vote. "I don't think it does anything to mitigate the intensity of the debate."
NATIONAL
January 18, 2006 | From Associated Press
Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, writing for the majority: The government's claim that the attorney general's decision is a legal, not medical, one does not suffice, for the Interpretive Rule places extensive reliance on medical judgments and views of the medical community in concluding that assisted suicide is not a legitimate medical purpose. The idea that Congress gave him such broad and unusual authority through an implicit delegation is not sustainable.
NATIONAL
December 8, 2005 | Tamara Lytle, Orlando Sentinel
Michael Schiavo, who fought for years to remove his wife, Terri, from a feeding tube that kept her alive, has turned his anger over Congress' intervention into political action. Schiavo announced Wednesday that he had opened TerriPAC to strike back at politicians who tried to keep his brain-damaged wife alive through legislation that he termed a "sickening exercise in raw political power."
NATIONAL
October 6, 2005 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court and its new chief justice, John G. Roberts Jr., heard the Bush administration's challenge to the nation's only right-to-die law Wednesday, a case that pits social conservatives against those who believe the terminally ill should be allowed medication that will end their lives. At issue is whether Oregon or the federal government has the power to decide whether doctors may prescribe lethal doses of medication. During arguments Wednesday, the justices sounded closely split.
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