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Right To Die

NATIONAL
April 17, 2005 | John Thor-Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
For the final two weeks of Terri Schiavo's life, Jon B. Eisenberg was part of her husband's legal team. But he knew he wouldn't walk away with a fee. Instead, the California lawyer said, he spent $2,800 of his own money to travel to Washington when it looked as if the Supreme Court might agree to hear the case. "Flight, hotels, food, cab, Alka-Seltzer, coffee -- it all came from my pocket," said Eisenberg, an appellate attorney from Oakland.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2005 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
A bill to allow terminally ill Californians to end their lives with lethal prescriptions cleared its first legislative hurdle Tuesday, amid controversy over privacy issues and potential abuse. The 5-4 vote in the Assembly Judiciary Committee puts California a step closer to becoming the second state in the nation, after Oregon, to allow doctor-assisted suicide Much testimony in the hearing centered on Oregon's seven years of experience with helping the terminally ill kill themselves.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2005 | From Associated Press
The medical examiner completed the autopsy of Terri Schiavo on Friday, clearing the way for the release of the body to her husband, who plans to cremate her remains and bury the ashes without telling his in-laws when or where. Results of the autopsy might not be released for several weeks, the medical examiner's office said. Michael Schiavo hopes the autopsy will settle questions about her medical condition, but experts differ on whether that will happen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2005 | Paul Pringle, Times Staff Writer
The husband and father failed to rally after last-ditch cancer surgery. His despairing family gathered at City of Hope National Medical Center to contemplate the ventilator that kept him alive. He left no living will, no written directives on whether to artificially extend his life. But he and his wife had followed media reports on the Terri Schiavo case.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2005 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
Conservative lawmakers' denunciations of the courts on Thursday signaled that Terri Schiavo's death was likely to escalate the war between the parties over President Bush's judicial nominations. House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R-Texas) and Sen. Rick Santorum (R-Pa.) -- two leading advocates of congressional intervention in the case -- criticized the state and federal courts involved following the death of the Florida woman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2005 | Jia-Rui Chong, Andrew Wang and Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writers
Like many Christians, the Rev. Mark Brewer and his wife, Carolyn, disagree over what should happen to Terri Schiavo. Carolyn Brewer believes the brain-damaged woman's feeding tube should be reinserted. Although her husband agrees with her underlying principles, he wonders whether it is right to prolong Schiavo's existence in such an impaired state of consciousness. "We should always protect life, because God gives life," Brewer, the head pastor at Bel Air Presbyterian Church, said Sunday.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2005 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
A spokesman for Terri Schiavo's parents said Sunday that their court battle to keep her alive was over, and as their daughter began her 10th day without food or water after her feeding tube was removed by judicial order, a family lawyer said she was past the "point of no return." "Terri is declining rapidly," lawyer David C. Gibbs III said on CBS' "Face the Nation." "We believe she has at this point passed where physically she would be able to recover.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2005 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
Terri Schiavo's parents failed Saturday in what could mark the end of their exhaustive legal struggle to keep their daughter alive: A state judge and the Florida Supreme Court dismissed their claim that she uttered the sounds "ahhhh" and "waaaa" in an attempt to shout "I want to live." The feeding tube that has sustained the severely brain-damaged woman for 15 years was removed nine days ago.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2005 | Carol J. Williams and Ellen Barry, Times Staff Writers
Terri Schiavo's parents lost more legal challenges Friday, with her father saying that "the people who are anxious to see her die are getting their wish. It's happening." Bob and Mary Schindler also issued another appeal to Gov. Jeb Bush to get their brain-damaged daughter's feeding tube reinserted as she entered her eighth day without nutrition. "With a stroke of his pen, he could stop all of this," Bob Schindler said late Friday.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2005 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
LONDON -- While U.S. politicians and courts debated the implications of removing Terri Schiavo's feeding tube, the rest of the world looked on this week with a mixture of revulsion and approval. Many commentators disagreed with the intervention of President Bush and Congress in the case of the brain-damaged 41-year-old, saying such vital, complex decisions are best left to courts, physicians and the family. They accused Bush and his religious-right allies of hypocrisy and political posturing.
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