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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1999
A federal judge has upheld parents' rights to sue teachers and school administrators who refuse to implement Proposition 227, the English-only initiative. A coalition headed by the California Teachers Assn. moved in court to overturn the initiative's enforcement mechanism, saying that it violated constitutional free speech rights. In a written order received by lawyers in the case Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Edward M. Rafeedie dismissed the lawsuit.
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BUSINESS
April 21, 2014 | David Lazarus
General Mills, maker of Cheerios and Wheaties, thinks it deserves credit for reversing itself after quietly trying to strip customers of their constitutional right to a day in court. But that's like a homeowner saying he deserves credit for putting out a house fire after deliberately setting his living room ablaze. The reality is that General Mills Inc., one of the nation's largest food companies, tried to pull a fast one on consumers and was caught off-guard by the volume and the scope of the backlash.
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NEWS
September 15, 1999 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A California appeals court, approving a controversial employer practice, has ruled that companies can force their workers to accept arbitration in labor disputes and give up the right to sue their employers. Tuesday's decision by the 2nd District Court of Appeal in Los Angeles means that employers can refuse to hire--or may even fire--workers who refuse to sign an arbitration agreement covering future disputes.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2013 | David Lazarus
Federal regulators are taking a closer look at those restrictive contract provisions that force consumers to arbitrate disputes - barring them from suing a company individually or joining a class-action lawsuit. And it doesn't look as if officials are buying into the business world's claim that such provisions are in consumers' best interest. "If you were to look in your wallet right now, the chances are high that one or more of your credit cards, debit cards or prepaid cards would be subject to a pre-dispute arbitration clause," Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, said during a recent appearance in Dallas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1996 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jim Bogle settles in to watch TV, the disturbing sound effects often come from nearby Burbank Airport, not from the tube. The boom of airplanes overhead can stop conversations. Telephone calls can require impeccable timing. Bogle, 66, and his wife, Marilyn, 63, routinely soothe visitors startled by the noise--and who sometimes look as if they think Martians might be invading.
NEWS
February 6, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court was asked Monday to allow a parole officer to be sued for allegedly assuring a woman she was in no danger just before she was killed by a paroled murderer who had threatened her life. The lawyer for survivors of a San Jose woman told the justices that the parole agent's "grossly negligent" assurances had lulled the victim into a false sense of security.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court in New York, in a case involving failed Lincoln Savings & Loan, ruled that a group of Saudi Arabian investors can press a racketeering and securities fraud case in this country against foreign banks and U.S. citizens. An attorney for the investors said the ruling, issued late Wednesday, could broaden the application of U.S. racketeering and securities laws to international schemes against foreign victims.
NEWS
October 13, 1988
An inmate who contends that he was refused a job in the McNeil Island, Wash., federal prison library because he is black has a right to sue under the Civil Rights Act, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday. A three-judge panel overturned a ruling by a U.S.
NEWS
May 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The state Senate defeated an Assembly-passed bill that would give people whose health was damaged by malathion spraying a clear path to sue governmental entities and the makers and suppliers of the controversial pesticide. The bill by Assemblyman Mike Roos (D-Los Angeles) failed on an 18-13 vote, three short of the 21 necessary for approval. Senators from agricultural districts teamed to block its passage.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Passenger Right to Sue Upheld: Airline passengers can sue under state law for being bumped from an overbooked flight, a federal appeals court ruled. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals said a Northwest Airlines passenger--who lost his seat on a 1986 flight from Great Falls, Mont., when the airline switched to a smaller plane--may have a damage suit under Montana law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- The Senate approved a measure Friday that would make it easier for some child abuse victims to sue private or nonprofit employers for failing to protect them from molesters. The bill, which is opposed by the Catholic Church, squeaked by on a 21-8 vote and now heads to the governor. The bill would allow some child abuse victims more time to file lawsuits against private institutions such as parochial schools, but would not apply to public schools. Some victims for whom the statute of limitations has expired would get a new one-year window during which they could bring a lawsuit.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
A 1996 law sought to protect struggling consumers from businesses promising to improve their credit rating, and specifically gave customers the right to sue any firm in violation. But the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that credit repair companies could block such lawsuits and instead force disgruntled customers into binding arbitration if they had agreed to such a provision in the fine print of their agreements. The 8-1 decision is another in a string of high court rulings in recent years that have backed an arbitration clause over a customer's right to file a lawsuit.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2011 | David Lazarus
Thanks to the U.S. Supreme Court, you may not have the right to sue a company you think has wronged you. Instead, if the company prefers, you could have to arbitrate the dispute — a process that consumer advocates say tips the scales of justice in favor of businesses. That imbalance would be remedied with passage of the Arbitration Fairness Act, a bill under consideration in Congress that would supersede the Supreme Court's ruling and reestablish consumers' right to sue and to join with others in class-action lawsuits.
SPORTS
August 2, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
Dodgers owner Frank McCourt on Monday will ask a judge in Boston to clear the way for him to pursue a malpractice claim against his former law firm that his attorneys say could be worth "hundreds of millions of dollars. " As McCourt wages legal battles in California and Delaware in an effort to keep control of the Dodgers, his court fight in Massachusetts is aimed at preserving his right to sue for a nine-figure damage award if he loses the team. He is likely to sue even if he does not lose the team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2011 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
In 2005, Deborah Kincaid called her estranged husband for an uncomfortable conversation. With the police listening in, she accused Jeffrey Kincaid of sexually abusing her daughter, Shannon, who was 11 when the couple married. When she asked why he had abused the girl, he said he didn't remember the abuse but continued on an enigmatic aside. "I don't know. I don't remember," he said. "You may be right. I'm beginning to believe that you're right. I — I can't make sense of it. " This week, an appellate court ruled that Kincaid could sue her ex-husband in civil court for allegedly causing her daughter's eventual death by suicide, based on recorded conversations between the couple and between Jeffrey Kincaid and his stepdaughter.
NATIONAL
November 3, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Obama administration upset liberals as well as the president's two Supreme Court appointees Wednesday by arguing that taxpayers had no right to sue the government if it used tax money to fund religious schools. The surprising argument came in this term's most important church-state dispute. At issue is the constitutionality of an unusual 13-year-old Arizona law that gives individuals dollar-for-dollar tax credits up to $500 for contributions to private organizations, which in turn allows taxpayers to direct a $500 tax credit to a private organization, which in turn pays tuition for students in private schools.
NEWS
January 6, 1996 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling California "the land of litigation," Gov. Pete Wilson on Friday endorsed three initiatives on the March ballot aimed at restricting the right to sue. Backers of the three measures said Wilson's endorsement will help them raise the millions they need to wage their campaign against one of the most wealthy interests in the state--trial lawyers. "These initiatives by themselves will not end lawsuit abuse, but they go a very long way," Wilson said.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a setback for child care advocates, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that federal judges have no power to force states to improve their care of abused and neglected children. The 7-2 decision means that child care activists no longer will be able to file class-action suits in federal court demanding improvements in state or local programs for abused children. Speaking for the court, Chief Justice William H.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2010 | By Michael Oneal
The unsecured creditors committee in Tribune Co.'s bankruptcy case asked a Delaware judge Monday for the right to sue Chicago real estate magnate Sam Zell and other investors and lenders who participated in the company's ill-fated 2007 leveraged buyout. The motion was largely procedural, and the document said the request is not aimed at disrupting a court-ordered mediation in the case, which is scheduled for this month. Lawyers for the committee had signaled at a previous court hearing that they would probably file a new complaint and ask for permission to pursue it because U.S. bankruptcy law would require bringing litigation surrounding the buyout within two years of the company's filing for Chapter 11 protection.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The Obama administration argued that allowing terrorism detainees in Afghanistan to challenge their detention in U.S. courts would endanger the military mission in that country. In a filing with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, the Justice Department said detainees at the Bagram military base should not have equal rights to sue in the U.S. that the Supreme Court granted last year to detainees at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The administration argued that Bagram is in an active war zone and in the sovereign nation of Afghanistan.
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