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SPORTS
January 9, 1993
Of all the rights and wrongs that occurred during the past college football season, could we at least take back the biggest injustice and have a recount of the Heisman vote? JOEL H. BRYDEN San Diego
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
A refresher course in avoiding illegal corruption is being planned for state senators and their staffs. That can't hurt. But it's unlikely to clean up any dirty legislators. Illegal corruption is not a redundancy. There's also legal corruption. Legislators, members of Congress and local politicians everywhere are influenced by campaign contributions from private interests, whether the money comes from unions, insurers, oil companies or casino-operating Indian tribes, to name just a handful of corrupting cash cows.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1985
When Christians speak out, we are called "fanatic fundamentalists" (praise God) who are "harassing" society. But if a gay rights, equal rights amendment or pro-abortion group speaks out, they are defending their civil rights and expressing their freedom of speech. Although we may be a minority, we too pay taxes to support the public school system. We are "protesting so much" to protect the minds of our impressionable children from being indoctrinated into secular humanism. We believe that humanism is both anti-God and anti-family, and that moral values cannot be self-determined and situational, but should be based on absolute rights and wrongs.
OPINION
June 26, 2013
Re "The right to remain silent is still golden," Editorial, June 24 The Times writes that when the U.S. Supreme Court's Miranda decision - which requires arrestees to be quickly informed of the right to an attorney and the right to remain silent - was handed down in 1966, conservatives objected, just as they are now after the Boston bombing suspect was read his Miranda rights. First, I remember the debate when this issue was before the Supreme Court. The biggest and loudest objections at that time were from law enforcement.
NEWS
February 18, 1990
In regard to a comment made about Fox TV's "Alien Nation" (Viewers' Views, Jan. 14), I disagree that it was a good idea badly developed. The series falls in line with the theatrical movie "Alien Nation," but utilizes the cop-show format to attract viewers to a show about racism. This way we can experience the lead characters' interracial friendship, view the rights and wrongs of our society through innocent eyes, reevaluate our standards about racism and still have a good time. The series also deals with the everyday situations of other aliens from all walks of life, and with alien culture, which reminds us of what an ethnic melting pot Los Angeles (the show's setting)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1985
I hear so much about how close-minded and irrational anti-abortionists are that I keep expecting reason and tolerance from the pro-choice people. They keep disappointing me. Take your recent article (Editorial Pages, April 3) by Corinne Shear Wood. Wood arguest that since women are determined to have abortions, ther is no point in discussing the rights and wrongs of having them; the only thing to talk about is how, not whether. This stance gives her some easy rhetorical advantages: she can play the pragmatist and dismiss the complicated questions of life before birth as mere "theoretics," "shrill raging," a "deceptive 'debate.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1990
Here are some of the letters that Calendar received on the PBS miniseries "The Civil War" and on two articles about it: Howard Rosenberg's "War Is Hell, but 'Civil War' Is Splendid" (Sept. 21) and Sharon Bernstein's "The Black Reaction to 'Civil War': Pain and Pride" (Sept. 29). Rosenberg's (favorable) review is fat-headed. Ken Burns' 11-hour "epic" on the Civil War has to disappoint anyone serious about finding out the truth. The miniseries does not even take up the question of Robert E. Lee's hypocritical and treasonous turn-about from hater of slavery and favorer of the Union.
OPINION
May 18, 2010 | Jonah Goldberg
We are taught to believe that ideology is the enemy of free thought. But that's not right. Ideology is a mere checklist of principles and priorities. The real enemy of clear thinking is the script. We think the world is supposed to go by a familiar plot. And when the facts conflict with the script, we edit the facts. So, for instance, David Horowitz is a stock villain on U.S. campuses because he deviates from the standard formula of coddling the usual victims and lionizing the usual heroes.
OPINION
June 26, 2013
Re "The right to remain silent is still golden," Editorial, June 24 The Times writes that when the U.S. Supreme Court's Miranda decision - which requires arrestees to be quickly informed of the right to an attorney and the right to remain silent - was handed down in 1966, conservatives objected, just as they are now after the Boston bombing suspect was read his Miranda rights. First, I remember the debate when this issue was before the Supreme Court. The biggest and loudest objections at that time were from law enforcement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
A refresher course in avoiding illegal corruption is being planned for state senators and their staffs. That can't hurt. But it's unlikely to clean up any dirty legislators. Illegal corruption is not a redundancy. There's also legal corruption. Legislators, members of Congress and local politicians everywhere are influenced by campaign contributions from private interests, whether the money comes from unions, insurers, oil companies or casino-operating Indian tribes, to name just a handful of corrupting cash cows.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Does she or doesn't she?" - the innuendo-filled catchphrase for Clairol from 1956 easily could have been conceived by "Mad Men's" Don Draper. It was not, of course, but rather was penned by one of the few female copywriters of her day. Jane Maas, also a pioneer in the nearly all-male world of advertising decades ago, pays homage to the hair color campaign by Shirley Polykoff in her new book, "Mad Women: The Other Side of Life on Madison Avenue...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Does she or doesn't she?" - the innuendo-filled catchphrase for Clairol from 1956 easily could have been conceived by "Mad Men's" Don Draper. It was not, of course, but rather was penned by one of the few female copywriters of her day. Jane Maas, also a pioneer in the nearly all-male world of advertising decades ago, pays homage to the hair color campaign by Shirley Polykoff in her new book, "Mad Women: The Other Side of Life on Madison Avenue in the '60s and Beyond. " A witty, personal account of the "real life Peggy Olson," Maas details her climb from copywriter to creative director at Ogilvy & Mather to "Advertising Woman of the Year" for her work on the famous "I Love New York" campaign.
OPINION
March 6, 2012 | JIM NEWTON
Last week, the nation lost an elegant inquisitor and a nasty pugilist. Both were conservatives and natives of Southern California, and they agreed about many matters of policy. But James Q. Wilson delved deeply on matters of significance and left a vast and consequential legacy. Andrew Breitbart raked for muck and accelerated the nation's unhappy race to replace civility with furor. They represented two distinct veins of our national discourse, and of the tensions within modern conservatism.
OPINION
October 23, 2009 | Abraham F. Lowenthal, Abraham F. Lowenthal, professor of international relations at USC and president emeritus of the Pacific Council on International Policy, is a nonresident senior fellow of the Brookings Institution.
No Washington analyst predicted that Honduras would pose a defining challenge to President Obama's Latin America policy, but perhaps that it has is not so surprising. After all, something similar happened in 1963, when the administration of John F. Kennedy abandoned its announced policy of withholding diplomatic recognition from regimes that took power by force, convinced by the military coup in Honduras that the United States could not effectively require electoral democracy. In the 1980s too, Honduras became the principal base for efforts funded and directed by the U.S. to overthrow the Sandinista government in Nicaragua and to thwart the guerrilla insurgency in El Salvador.
SPORTS
February 24, 2008 | Philip Hersh, Special to the Times
Joey Cheek was shocked yet no longer surprised that a number of countries have tried to stifle what their athletes at this summer's Beijing Olympics say about China. Cheek has learned quickly that it is one thing for Olympic officials to espouse the humanitarian ideals expressed in the Olympic Charter and another to insist those officials stand behind the ideals to help alleviate a humanitarian crisis.
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