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NEWS
February 20, 1994 | Newsday
The NAACP has endorsed Deval Patrick, a Boston lawyer who is President Clinton's nominee to head the Justice Department's civil rights division, and vowed to push for a quick confirmation. Patrick appeared before the NAACP board at its national meeting Friday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 6, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Debo Adegbile, President Obama's nominee to head the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division, is an experienced litigator and specialist in civil rights law. In a rational world, he would receive unanimous confirmation. But as the Senate Judiciary Committee prepares to vote on his nomination, Adegbile faces opposition from conservatives who don't like his legal philosophy and a law enforcement group that won't forgive him for participating in the appeal of a man convicted of killing a police officer.
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NEWS
July 23, 1985
Continuing its legal battle with Democratic Gov. Mark White, the Justice Department asked a federal court to order Texas to seek "within five days" U.S. approval of a special congressional election set for Aug. 3. Assistant Atty. Gen. William Bradford Reynolds, who heads the civil rights division, said the state's failure to get federal clearance violated the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2009 | Teresa Watanabe
The nation's top civil rights attorney vowed today to step up enforcement of laws against housing bias, hate crimes, racially targeted predatory lending and other discriminatory acts in what he called a new era of "transformation and restoration." Thomas Perez, U.S. assistant attorney general for civil rights, also said during a keynote address to an Asian Pacific American civil rights conference in Los Angeles that he would "depoliticize decision-making" and work to restore trust between career attorneys and political appointees in the Justice Department.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate confirmed John R. Dunne, a former New York state senator, as head of the Justice Department's civil rights division, ending a long and stormy search to fill the vacancy. Dunne, 60, was approved by voice vote without dissent, although he ran into some criticism during his confirmation hearing for belonging to two men-only clubs and owning $20,000 in stocks in firms doing business in South Africa. Dunne was selected by President Bush after the Judiciary Committee rejected William Lucas.
NEWS
May 10, 1989 | From Associated Press
A coalition of civil rights organizations voiced its opposition Tuesday to the appointment of William Lucas to head the Justice Department's civil rights division. The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights said Lucas does not have the experience or litigation skills needed in the position, which is the federal government's top civil rights job. The conference is an umbrella group of 180 organizations and the opposition was adopted "by consensus" at a meeting of the conference, said Ralph Neas, executive director of the organization.
NEWS
September 25, 1985 | Associated Press
Nine members of the Ku Klux Klan have been indicted on charges of conspiring to violate the rights of blacks and whites in a series of cross burnings and shootings in 1982 and 1983, the Justice Department announced today. The KKK members, all from North Carolina, were named in a 20-count indictment returned Tuesday in federal court in Asheville and unsealed today. All nine defendants, including two who are leaders of the klan in North Carolina, also were charged with perjury.
NEWS
April 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush today nominated William Lucas, a black Republican critic of affirmative action, as the Justice Department's civil rights chief, setting up a potentially bruising Senate confirmation fight. The previously announced opposition to Lucas by the NAACP, the nation's largest civil rights group, could energize liberal opposition to the nominee. NAACP Executive Director Benjamin L. Hooks said in a statement Monday that Lucas is not qualified to be the government's chief enforcer of civil rights laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2009 | Teresa Watanabe
The nation's top civil rights attorney vowed today to step up enforcement of laws against housing bias, hate crimes, racially targeted predatory lending and other discriminatory acts in what he called a new era of "transformation and restoration." Thomas Perez, U.S. assistant attorney general for civil rights, also said during a keynote address to an Asian Pacific American civil rights conference in Los Angeles that he would "depoliticize decision-making" and work to restore trust between career attorneys and political appointees in the Justice Department.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
Democratic Party Chairman Ron Brown, obviously relishing the prospect of the Rev. Jesse Jackson running for mayor of Washington next year, Wednesday suggested that it would be good for Jackson, Washington and the Democratic Party if he makes the race. As Brown sees it, the civil rights leader would be a shoo-in for election and would be well equipped to deal with the problems of drugs and violence plaguing Washington. Moreover, as mayor, Jackson, a polarizing force in the 1988 Democratic presidential race, would be effectively removing himself as a potential candidate for the party's nomination in 1992, according to Brown.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2009 | Chris Kraul
At its bankruptcy filing last June, General Motors Corp. announced drastic cutbacks in its domestic and international operations but kept its South American subsidiary off the auction block. In a recent interview at the regional headquarters here of what is now General Motors Co., GM-Mercosur President Jaime Ardila explained why. Simply put, he said GM's Brazil operation, the company's third-largest after those in the U.S. and China, is the company's "most valuable asset" in profitability and growth potential.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2006 | Charles Duhigg, Times Staff Writer
Universal Music Group is expected to purchase Bertelsmann's BMG Music Publishing unit for about $2.1 billion, creating the world's largest music publisher, said people familiar with the negotiations. Bertelsmann is selling the operation to help pay for its buyback of a 25.1% stake in the German media giant for $5.8-billion from Groupe Bruxelles Lambert, which had been threatening to force the privately held company to go public.
SPORTS
February 20, 1999 | MIKE BRESNAHAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The team that was 5-25 last season can now say it won a playoff game. You wouldn't know it by the silence in the Alemany High locker room Friday night, after the Indians defeated Santa Paula, 62-49, in a first-round game of the Southern Section Division III-AA boys' basketball playoffs at L.A. Baptist. The expectations at Alemany have risen so high that a near-perfect first half was overshadowed by a sluggish second half.
SPORTS
May 27, 1998 | DAVE DESMOND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ashlie D'Errico can still hear her father's voice. "Relax and see the ball, Ashlie." "Be patient, don't rush it." The Highland High freshman catcher followed each of those instructions on Tuesday and hit a bases-loaded double to key the Bulldogs' 4-0 victory over Crescenta Valley in the second round of the Southern Section Division I softball playoffs at Highland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
One of the nation's top public interest lawyers could soon be leaving Los Angeles for a bigger job--chief of the U.S. Justice Department's civil rights division. White House sources disclosed recently that Bill Lann Lee, western regional counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, is one of two finalists to succeed Deval Patrick as assistant attorney general for civil rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
One of the nation's top public interest lawyers could soon be leaving Los Angeles for a bigger job--chief of the U.S. Justice Department's civil rights division. White House sources disclosed recently that Bill Lann Lee, western regional counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, is one of two finalists to succeed Deval Patrick as assistant attorney general for civil rights.
OPINION
February 6, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Debo Adegbile, President Obama's nominee to head the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division, is an experienced litigator and specialist in civil rights law. In a rational world, he would receive unanimous confirmation. But as the Senate Judiciary Committee prepares to vote on his nomination, Adegbile faces opposition from conservatives who don't like his legal philosophy and a law enforcement group that won't forgive him for participating in the appeal of a man convicted of killing a police officer.
SPORTS
March 19, 1994 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the battle of big folk, Emily Hart stood just a little taller. Hart, a 6-foot-3 senior center for Sacramento El Camino, outdueled Angela Burgess, Woodbridge's 6-4 junior, in the State Division II girls' basketball championship game Friday. Hart finished with 13 points and 15 rebounds in the 71-38 victory at the Oakland Coliseum Arena. It was a big moment for Hart because of the bigger opponent.
NEWS
February 20, 1994 | Newsday
The NAACP has endorsed Deval Patrick, a Boston lawyer who is President Clinton's nominee to head the Justice Department's civil rights division, and vowed to push for a quick confirmation. Patrick appeared before the NAACP board at its national meeting Friday.
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