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NEWS
September 27, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
Sen. Barbara Boxer on Thursday urged the Justice Department to enforce voting rights laws following a Los Angeles Times story detailing efforts to purge voter rolls in Ohio. The story described efforts by tea party members to remove at least 2,100 names from voter rolls in the swing state. A group called the Ohio Voter Integrity Project, an offshoot of True the Vote, worked to remove students from rolls for not specifying their dorm room numbers, as one example. It also tried to remove a woman who had lived at the same residence for seven years because her home was listed as a commercial, rather than residential, building.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | By David Zahniser
The lawyer for a group of Los Angeles residents looking to undo year-old boundaries for 15 City Council districts filed a complaint Wednesday accusing two top elected officials - including newly inaugurated Mayor Eric Garcetti - of violating federal voting rights laws when the maps were developed. Attorney Leo Terrell sent a letter to U.S. Atty. Gen. Eric Holder alleging that then-City Councilman Garcetti and Council President Herb Wesson disenfranchised voters, redrawing district lines in a way that benefited incumbents while disenfranchising the public.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1994
Your editorial "A Serving of Justice at Denny's" (May 27) was right on the mark concerning the need to vigorously enforce civil rights laws. No pun intended, but the lawyers in the Civil Rights Division at the Justice Department hit a "grand slam." As important as the Denny's case may be from a legal perspective, there is a larger, unenforceable issue to be considered: the obligation we all have to be responsible citizens. Obligations imply a moral, not merely a legal, command.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | By David Zahniser
The lawyer for a group of Los Angeles residents suing to redraw year-old boundaries for 15 City Council districts on Wednesday accused two top elected officials - including newly installed Mayor Eric Garcetti - of violating federal voting rights law when the maps were developed. Attorney Leo Terrell sent a letter to U.S. Atty. Gen. Eric Holder alleging that Council President Herb Wesson and then-Councilman Garcetti created the maps in a way that benefited "certain politicians" while disenfranchising the public.
NEWS
August 2, 1989 | From Times wire service s
President Bush reached a compromise with key senators from both parties today on legislation extending the nation's civil rights laws to protect the disabled from discrimination. The accord was announced by the White House shortly before the Senate Labor Committee revised and approved the measure on a 16-0 vote, sending it to the full chamber.
NEWS
May 18, 1987 | Associated Press
The Supreme Court, significantly expanding the scope of civil rights legislation, ruled today that federal civil rights laws aimed primarily at helping blacks may also protect Jews and Arabs against discrimination. The court, in two unanimous decisions, in effect said that race may involve more than skin pigment. In one case, the court cleared the way for a suit by an Arab who said he was denied tenure on a Pennsylvania college faculty because of racial discrimination.
NEWS
December 23, 1991 | Jerry Hicks
EXPENSIVE CROSS: Before 1992, most cross-burning cases had to be tried in federal court, using obscure property rights laws. But Assemblyman Tom Umberg (D-Garden Grove, above) got a bill passed that makes cross-burning a state crime, with a three-year penalty. . . . "If you burn a cross on a black family's door, it's clear you're trying to terrorize them," he says. Umberg is familiar with the issue.
NEWS
May 31, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal grand jury in Los Angeles charged a Somis flower rancher, six foremen and an alleged smuggler with enslaving more than 100 Mexican laborers, forcing them to work for sub-minimum wages and selling them food and sundries at inflated prices from a company store. The defendants, including Edwin M. Ives, 54, owner of the ranch in Ventura County, face up to 52 years in prison and $2 million in fines if convicted, according to federal prosecutors.
OPINION
June 23, 2008
Re "From 1968 to eternity," Opinion, June 17 I am not sure where Todd Gitlin was in 1968, but I was observing the situation up close. I saw the decades-old fight for basic civil rights degenerate into a demand for special privileges. I saw Students for a Democratic Society trample on democratic principles. I saw academic freedoms and standards diminished by political correctness. Gitlin gives the movement credit for making it possible for Nicolas Sarkozy, descended from Jews, to be elected president of France.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The Supreme Court voted unanimously today to leave intact a historic civil rights ruling used to combat discrimination, but at the same time limited its scope to make it harder for women and minorities to sue for racial harassment. The high court, in the most important civil rights case of its term, decided against overturning the landmark 1976 ruling that upheld a post-Civil War law outlawing racial discrimination in all private contracts. But in the same ruling the justices split along conservative and liberal lines, voting 5 to 4 in holding that the law does not cover racial harassment lawsuits.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court promises "equal justice under law" - the words carved into stone on its facade - and last week, the justices set out a new definition of equal justice that they see as suited to this time. On the last day of their term, they struck down a 1990s-era federal law that denied all legal recognition to the tens of thousands of same-sex couples who have been legally married in the last decade - a ruling that set off gay rights celebrations from the court's steps to the West Coast.
OPINION
October 15, 2012
In the latest chapter of a long-running controversy over anti-Israel protests at UC Berkeley, the U.S. Department of Education has launched an investigation into whether Jewish students at the university are the victims of a "pervasive hostile environment" in violation of federal civil rights laws. Given the importance of free speech, especially in a university setting, the department needs to tread carefully. The department responded to a request from lawyers for two recent Berkeley graduates who earlier had sued the university complaining about a "dangerous anti-Semitic climate" at Berkeley.
NATIONAL
September 30, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court is not on the ballot in November, but its future direction on issues such as abortion, gay rights, gun rights, voting laws and the role of money in politics depends on who is elected president for the next four years. The justices, who open their annual term Monday, are closely split along ideological lines. The current court has four liberals appointed by Democrats, four conservatives appointed by Republicans, and a centrist Republican in 76-year-old Justice Anthony M. Kennedy.
NEWS
September 27, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
Sen. Barbara Boxer on Thursday urged the Justice Department to enforce voting rights laws following a Los Angeles Times story detailing efforts to purge voter rolls in Ohio. The story described efforts by tea party members to remove at least 2,100 names from voter rolls in the swing state. A group called the Ohio Voter Integrity Project, an offshoot of True the Vote, worked to remove students from rolls for not specifying their dorm room numbers, as one example. It also tried to remove a woman who had lived at the same residence for seven years because her home was listed as a commercial, rather than residential, building.
NATIONAL
October 18, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court agreed Monday to resolve an international human rights dispute over whether corporations and political groups can be held liable in American courts for their role in the torture, killing and enslavement of victims abroad. Since the Nazi war crimes trials at Nuremberg, Germany, after World War II, international law has held that human rights abuses can be prosecuted around the globe. And two U.S. laws — the Alien Tort Statute of 1789 and the Torture Victims Protection Act of 1992 — give American courts the jurisdiction to decide human rights cases.
OPINION
March 10, 2011
The Supreme Court this week had good news for a Texas death row inmate: He can sue a district attorney who won't give him access to DNA evidence that might clear him. The 6-3 decision, which opens a new avenue of appeal for condemned prisoners, is welcome. But it falls short of what the court should do to make DNA evidence available to every prisoner who requests it. Henry Skinner was convicted of murdering his girlfriend and her two sons in 1993. He says he was in an alcoholic haze during the killings and that his girlfriend's uncle was probably the killer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1985
Ken Masugi's letter (July 12) ignores the practical problems involved in enforcing the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits employment discrimination based on race, sex, etc. The court orders--to which Masugi, President Reagan and William Bradford Reynolds objected--were issued in cases in which the evidence showed, and the trial courts found, that the employer had systematically and intentionally violated the Civil Rights Act and, unless...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1989
The Supreme Court has handed Congress its civil rights agenda for the 1990s. In three out of four decisions just handed down, the court weakened the rights of minorities and women. It is now up to Congress to reaffirm the nation's commitment to stamp out discrimination based on race or sex. In the 1960s and 1970s Congress and the federal courts moved largely in the same direction on discrimination cases. Congress was disposed to act against bias in elections, employment, education and the economy, and the courts did not oppose those actions.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2010 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Tribune Washington Bureau
On Tuesday, Rand Paul was the outsider of the moment. On Friday, he was out in the cold. Few Republicans jumped to the aid of their party's Kentucky U.S. Senate candidate as he took heat Friday for questioning tenets of civil rights legislation and, later, defending the oil company at the center of the epic spill in the Gulf of Mexico by saying "accidents happen." The silence could hardly come as a shock for a candidate who won his primary Tuesday by promising to tear down the establishment.
NATIONAL
November 11, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
With a historic endorsement from the Mormon church, the Salt Lake City Council unanimously passed a pair of ordinances making it illegal to discriminate against gays in housing and employment. It was the first time the church has publicly supported gay rights legislation. Michael Otterson, spokesman for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, said the church "remains unequivocally committed" in its opposition to gay marriage.
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