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NATIONAL
August 22, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Christopher Lane was Australian. But his death in Oklahoma -- allegedly at the hands of three "bored" teenagers -- has become entangled in uncomfortable conversations and innuendo about race in the U.S. And nothing about the debate, of course, has been simple. Take one announcement issued Thursday: A Los Angeles commentator and radio host urged civil rights leaders to condemn the shooting of Lane, a white man, after it was revealed that one of the suspects, who is black, had previously tweeted that he hated white people.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Jay Z has broken his silence over pressure to shutter his forthcoming holiday collection for Barneys New York, and the hip-hop mogul says he's being unfairly “demonized” for not responding to protests. After two high-profile incidents of young shoppers -- both of whom were black -- being questioned after purchases from Barneys, an online protest emerged calling on the multi-platinum star to withdraw his support from the luxury retailer. Change.org, a site that has previously taken rappers like Rocko, Rick Ross and Lil Wayne to task over controversial lyrics, launched the petition last week and have already garnered more than 16,300 signatures.
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NATIONAL
July 15, 2013 | By Michael Muskal and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
SANFORD, Fla. -- After a day of nationwide demonstrations protesting the verdict in the George Zimmerman murder case in Florida, civil rights leaders prepared to step up their calls for justice for Trayvon Martin, the unarmed teenager killed more than a year ago. The Rev. Al Sharpton, a prominent civil rights activist and a television host on MSNBC, announced that his National Action Network will hold demonstrations and prayer vigils in 100 cities...
NATIONAL
August 22, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Christopher Lane was Australian. But his death in Oklahoma -- allegedly at the hands of three "bored" teenagers -- has become entangled in uncomfortable conversations and innuendo about race in the U.S. And nothing about the debate, of course, has been simple. Take one announcement issued Thursday: A Los Angeles commentator and radio host urged civil rights leaders to condemn the shooting of Lane, a white man, after it was revealed that one of the suspects, who is black, had previously tweeted that he hated white people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2013 | By Frank Shyong
Civil rights leaders in the Antelope Valley demanded reforms from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department on Tuesday, charging that racially biased policing has left residents living in fear. The U.S. Department of Justice last week found that local authorities conducted a systematic effort to discriminate against African Americans who received low-income subsidized housing and that deputies engaged in widespread unlawful searches of homes, improper detentions and unreasonable force.
NEWS
September 10, 1992 | Associated Press
Civil rights leaders accused the Senate of ignoring the concerns of black Americans in voting Wednesday to confirm President Bush's nomination of Alabama Assistant Atty. Gen. Edward Carnes to the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. "I think Ed Carnes, once again, got an all-white jury," said Stephen Bright, Southern Center for Human Rights director, after the 62-36 Senate vote.
NEWS
July 6, 1985 | United Press International
Three veteran civil rights leaders were acquitted of federal election fraud charges Friday in a case that had led national black leaders to accuse the government of harassing minority voters. A federal court jury of seven blacks and five whites deliberated for about four hours before finding Albert Turner; his wife, Evelyn Turner, and Spencer Hogue Jr. not guilty of the charges. Burst Into Tears Turner smiled, his wife burst into tears and Hogue hugged his lawyer when the verdicts were read.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Rev. Melvin H. Watson, 98, who influenced Martin Luther King Jr. and helped train other civil rights leaders, died June 19 after surgery at Crawford Long Hospital in Atlanta, said Walter Earl Fluker, executive director of the Leadership Center at Morehouse College there and Watson's son-in-law.
NEWS
January 19, 1987 | Associated Press
Civil rights leaders announced today they will return next weekend to Forsyth County, where a "brotherhood anti-intimidation march" was halted when marchers were pelted with rocks and bottles by Ku Klux Klansmen and their followers. The Rev. Hosea Williams, the Atlanta city councilman who led last Saturday's march, announced that he and Coretta Scott King will lead a second march in the all-white northern Georgia county on Saturday.
NEWS
November 30, 2000 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National civil rights leaders Wednesday stepped up their allegations of voting irregularities in Florida, accusing election officials in Miami-Dade County and elsewhere of systematically interfering with minority voters' access to the polls. The fresh round of complaints, based on the federal Voting Rights Act of 1965, at once invoked the tortured history of Southern politics while threatening to add yet another layer of contentiousness to an election that seems to grow more bitter as it ages.
NATIONAL
July 17, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Civil rights leaders at the NAACP national convention Wednesday called the acquittal of Trayvon Martin's killer a setback for the movement, and the audience agreed. As Martin Luther King III and the Revs. Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton addressed the crowd of a couple of thousand, the audience murmured, “That's right,” “Amen” and “I remember.” Sharpton noted that George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch volunteer who shot Martin, was arrested and charged only after activists marched and petitioned for a Justice Department civil rights investigation and then the Florida governor appointed a special prosecutor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2013 | By Frank Shyong
Civil rights leaders in the Antelope Valley demanded reforms from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department on Tuesday, charging that racially biased policing has left residents living in fear. The U.S. Department of Justice last week found that local authorities conducted a systematic effort to discriminate against African Americans who received low-income subsidized housing and that deputies engaged in widespread unlawful searches of homes, improper detentions and unreasonable force.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2013 | By Frank Shyong
Civil rights leaders in the Antelope Valley demanded reforms from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department on Tuesday, claiming racially biased policing has left residents living in fear. The U.S. Department of Justice last week found that local authorities conducted a systematic effort to discriminate against African Americans who received low-income subsidized housing, and that sheriff's deputies engaged in widespread unlawful searches of homes, improper detentions and unreasonable force.
OPINION
March 29, 2013 | By David B. Oppenheimer
This year is the 50th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s decision to violate an injunction forbidding him to pray, sing or march in public in Birmingham, Ala. On Good Friday 1963 (which fell on April 12 that year), King led a march from the 16th Street Baptist Church (where four black children would be killed in a bombing five months later), heading toward City Hall. He was almost immediately arrested, charged with violating a court order and taken to the Birmingham jail.
WORLD
November 22, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi expanded his authority Thursday in a startling power grab that weakens the courts and frees him from judicial oversight amid deepening political intrigue in the Arab world's most populous nation. The Islamist president's bold gesture, which infuriated civil rights leaders, came the day after he was praised for negotiating a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas. Thursday's move in effect makes Morsi, who already holds executive and legislative powers, the ultimate force in a country that has no parliament and has yet to draft a new constitution.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2012 | By Rene Lynch and Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
SANFORD, Fla. — The nation's leading civil rights advocates and outraged everyday people packed this laid-back lakeside community Monday to demand the arrest of the man who killed African American teenager Trayvon Martin, even as police sources portrayed the unarmed youth as the aggressor. Beneath an incongruously cheerful Florida sun, the passionate but well-behaved crowd marched, chanting and shouting, toward the Sanford Civic Center. Inside, the City Commission ceded most of its regularly scheduled meeting to Martin's grieving parents, their lawyer and a roster of civil rights luminaries who criticized the city's leadership and its handling of a case that, to some, symbolizes lingering racism and a justice system that too often fails black victims of violence.
NEWS
July 7, 1988 | Keith Love \f7
A group of top civil rights leaders met Wednesday with Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis in Boston, and afterward one said the majority of black voters will enthusiastically support the Democratic ticket in the fall even if the Rev. Jesse Jackson is not on it. Benjamin Hooks, executive director of the National Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1986 | NANCY RAY, Times Staff Writer
Mark Twain would have been proud of Mario Torero. The artist did Twain's Tom Sawyer one better. Torero talked the whole Southeast San Diego community into painting his fence for him. Actually, Torero, unlike the fictional Sawyer, did a lot of the painting himself on the colorful 200-foot-long mural that completely covers the cement-block retaining walls on the northwest corner of 32nd Street and Imperial Avenue. The mural, dedicated to Martin Luther King Jr.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
Judy Forte plans to report to her government job Monday morning without a hint of complaint. She is 54 and superintendent of the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site, a unit of the National Park Service. The King holiday is her Super Bowl. Thousands will make their way Monday to Auburn Avenue, just east of downtown Atlanta, to bear witness at King's outdoor crypt, and to tour his birth home. They will crowd into the civil rights history display underneath Forte's office, and the meticulously preserved old Ebenezer Baptist Church across the street, where King preached and plotted his nonviolent revolution.
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