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Rights Of Way

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1991
The Los Angeles City Council voted Wednesday to participate in the $1.14-million purchase of a two-mile railroad right of way along Chandler Boulevard that could link a Metro Rail station to a commuter rail line terminal in Burbank. By a 14-0 vote, the council approved spending $143,000 in city transit funds to purchase the Southern Pacific railroad line, although no firm plan yet exists to make use of it.
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NATIONAL
March 10, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court dealt a setback Monday to the popular redevelopment trend of transforming abandoned railroad lines into public bike paths, ruling that buyers of such lands are not required to continue granting a federal right of way. Legal experts said the decision would make it harder to build bike or hiking trails in areas of the West where railroads were often built on former federal land. In some instances, local governments may be forced to pay compensation to owners whose land is now crossed by bike paths or other government-built trails and parks.
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OPINION
May 9, 1993
Hurray for Epstein's comments regarding the acquisition of railroad rights of way for the Alameda Corridor project. It's clear, we as Californians face our most acute economic challenge in decades. Equally as clear, state and local government must foster economic development-infrastructure projects such as the Alameda Corridor to bring jobs and an improved standard of living to Southern California. However, it became sorely apparent after a joint hearing on the Alameda Corridor project co-chaired by Assemblywoman Karnette and myself that railroad rights-of-way valuation procedures and guidelines were highly subjective and indeed unfair to California taxpayers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2013 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
Around the corner from the bustle and roar of Broadway's Jewelry District in downtown L.A., a quiet alley serves as a respite for locals and tourists. Shops and restaurants with colorful awnings and peeling brick facades present a kitschy, Old World scene, complete with a potbellied chef statue, and a Marilyn Monroe perched in a pink Cadillac. On most days, a group of Armenian men can be spotted hunched over a backgammon board, shrouded in cigarette smoke. But the fate of St. Vincent's Court - a California historical landmark - has been thrown into question after a complaint prompted a city crackdown on outdoor seating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
Efforts to obtain rights to a key, one-mile segment of railroad track in Claremont have stumbled, threatening the construction timetable of a commuter rail line between Los Angeles and San Bernardino County, regional rail authorities said Tuesday. The Southern California Regional Rail Authority is seeking permission from Santa Fe Railroad for use of the rail segment, part of a 57-mile line between Los Angeles and San Bernardino County proposed for completion by October, 1992.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1991 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Private talks have been bogged down for two months between transportation officials and the Santa Fe Railway over hundreds of miles of track for a regional commuter rail system, but public feuding between the two sides continued unabated Tuesday. Santa Fe Vice President Robert L.
NEWS
April 14, 1992 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
After 17 months of court delays, transportation officials Monday voted to pump more than $100 million in Measure M tax revenues into Orange County's ailing economy by purchasing property for highway expansions and financing local street improvements. Although not the first use of Measure M receipts, OCTA's decision is the most ambitious effort yet, with $80.6 million to be spent within the next 10 weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1993 | GREG KRIKORIAN and NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A proposed $1.8-billion rail and truck corridor touted as a major economic boon for the area moved closer to reality Thursday as the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach announced purchase plans for 20 miles of Southern Pacific right of way. The $240-million purchase agreement comes four months after the fate of the so-called Alameda Corridor was cast in doubt by questions over the track's price tag and related costs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT
The City Council agree to send a $420,000 check to the county for a property needed to begin work on realigning Dale Street. The $9.8-million project will align Dale Street, which currently dead-ends at Malvern Avenue, with Burlingame Avenue. When the project is completed, motorists driving north on Dale will cross a new railroad underpass and then drive across Malvern directly onto Burlingame. Work is expected to begin in June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1994 | SHELBY GRAD
Plans to transform a narrow 1.3-mile railroad right-of-way into a neighborhood recreation area took a step forward this month with a meeting between Northwood residents and a noted urban designer. Residents packed a local middle school one Saturday morning two weeks ago to discuss the fledgling park's design and give their input to San Francisco architect Lawrence Halprin, who volunteered his time to work on the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2013 | By Alene Tchekmedyian, Los Angeles Times
The brightly colored vans advertising "Topless Maids $99" caused a stir in Burbank last year when they were seen parked on city streets for days on end, prompting officials to publicly denounce them as eyesores and visual blight. Last week, the City Council voted to ban vehicles whose main purpose is advertising. There are some exemptions, such as pizza and mail delivery vehicles. "What we're capturing with this ordinance is those signs that are bolted to a van, leaned against a van, trailers that are unhitched and left in the public right of way," Deputy City Planner Patrick Prescott said at Tuesday's meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2011 | By Mark Kellam, Los Angeles Times
A handful of residents living along a busy stretch of Glendale Avenue say city officials are forcing them to take down mirrors they've attached to trees in the public right-of-way so they can better see oncoming traffic while exiting their driveways. The residents, who live north of the Ventura Freeway, say that in the absence of any speed-reduction enhancements — such as humps — the convex mirrors are one of the few safety measures they have. City officials, though, say the mirrors aren't allowed on city-owned trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2011 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
Go ahead, play in the street. So say organizers of CicLAvia , an event Sunday that allows bicyclists, skateboarders, pedestrians and rollerbladers — second-class citizens in this car-dependent city — to dominate nearly eight miles of Los Angeles' streets. The ciclovia, which means bicycle path in Spanish, began in Bogota, Colombia, several decades ago in response to pollution and street congestion. Instead of driving elsewhere for entertainment, residents were invited to use the street as their playground.
NEWS
April 26, 2009 | Lisa Rathke, Rathke writes for the Associated Press.
The black salamander with yellow spots sat on the roadside in the dark, ready to make a go of it. But it was not on its own. It got help from an escort -- one of 45 people who volunteered on a recent night to carry salamanders, frogs and newts across the road during their annual migration to mate. On rainy nights in early spring, roads between forests and vernal pools are hopping and crawling with activity. On some nights, hundreds of amphibians cross small stretches of asphalt to mate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2009 | Martha Groves
In a victory for environmentalists and many traffic-weary residents, the Exposition Construction Authority board has voted to use the existing railroad right-of-way along Exposition Boulevard to extend the rail line from Culver City to Santa Monica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2009 | Steve Hymon
Of the many issues facing the six candidates in the 5th District City Council race in Los Angeles, none is potentially thornier than the routing of the proposed Expo Line light rail. Should the train run along the old rail right-of-way that cuts through several residential neighborhoods between the 10 Freeway and Pico Boulevard? And, if so, should the train cross busy north-south streets or go under or over them?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a bitter exchange between lawmakers, a Los Angeles City Council panel Wednesday postponed until Oct. 14 a decision on a controversial proposal to scrap a long-range plan for extending Reseda Boulevard to Mulholland Drive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1994 | BILL BOYARSKY
There's more trouble ahead for the Southland's biggest public works project--the proposed $1.8-billion Alameda Corridor high-speed freight line between the harbor and Downtown Los Angeles that backers say will create thousands of jobs. Jobs are badly needed here after a long recession and defense cutbacks. The corridor project would generate them by greatly increasing the capacity of the L.A. and Long Beach harbors just as trade with the Far East is taking off.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2008 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
At a time of skyrocketing gas costs, soaring airline fares and global-warming fears, the timing would seem perfect for a statewide vote on a 200-mph bullet train. But five months before voters decide whether to approve bonds for the high-speed rail line from Los Angeles to San Francisco, the $30-billion project has hit a new obstacle. An old-guard railroad is declining to share its right-of-way.
OPINION
May 22, 2008
Re "Red-light cameras catch right turns and lots of revenue," May 19 As a frequent pedestrian in Long Beach, I have no trouble with tickets being issued to drivers who don't obey the law regarding right turns on red lights. Since the beginning of the year, I have come close to being hit three times (when I had a walk signal) by drivers who actually stopped and looked to their left for traffic but did not bother to notice that I was in the crosswalk. At a minimum, a photo citation should provide an important educational opportunity for drivers clearly ignorant of traffic laws, and perhaps reduce the future risk to pedestrians.
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