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Rights Struggle

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NATIONAL
January 19, 2010 | By Christi Parsons
President Obama convened a group of African American "elders" at the White House on Monday in the hopes of reminding young people that the struggle for civil rights is not so far in the American past. Before the event could get started, though, a guest leaned over to whisper a different message into his ear, one informed by more than a century of experience. "This must be the Lord's doing," 102-year-old Mabel Harvey told him, "because we've come a mighty long way." As he delivered his own message in honor of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. on the holiday marking his birthday, Obama and his administration emphasized the work yet to be done to realize the slain civil rights leader's vision.
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SPORTS
September 25, 2013 | By Dylan Hernandez
SAN FRANCISCO - When the Dodgers won the National League West title last week, Hanley Ramirez and Ricky Nolasco shared a champagne-soaked embrace. "Finally," Ramirez told Nolasco. "We're going to the playoffs. " Ramirez and Nolasco's previous seasons together all ended in disappointment. For six-plus years, they were teammates on the Marlins, who were crippled season after season by frugal owner Jeffrey Loria. BOX SCORE: San Francisco 6, Dodgers 4 Ramirez earned his escape from baseball purgatory last year, when the Marlins dumped his salary on the Dodgers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1985
If America's civil rights groups have outlived their purpose, as President Reagan stated recently, then why do areas with predominantly black populations--such as Watts--still report infant mortality rates such as the ones reported in an article in The Times (Jan. 27)? We have many miles to go, Mr. President, before blacks, women ,and other of America's minorities face equal opportunities, not only under the law, but also within the culture and subcultures of America's people. The health center in Watts began with federal funds, but is now self-sufficient.
SPORTS
May 2, 2013 | By Dylan Hernandez
Josh Beckett has changed. The flamethrower has turned into a finesse pitcher. The cocky kid has become polite, even warm. This would all make for a nice story about a former phenom who is maturing and learning to deal with his age-inflicted limitations. Except for one thing: This 32-year-old version of Beckett has trouble getting hitters out. Beckett has failed to complete six innings in four of his six starts this season, including Wednesday night in the Dodgers' 7-3 loss to the Colorado Rockies at Dodger Stadium.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1999
Some broadcast and cable programs contain material included in the public school curriculum and on standardized examinations. Here are weekend home-viewing tips: Today--"The Living Edens" (KCET, 8-9 p.m.) This documentary about biological diversity focuses on the Himalayan nation of Bhutan. Donald Sutherland narrates. VCR+43356. Friday--"Turning Point" (TLC, 4-5 p.m.) This is a documentary about the June 1964 slayings of three civil rights workers in Mississippi. VCR+690115.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2008 | Paloma Esquivel, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa was the guest of honor Friday at a Los Angeles mosque. But it was the spirit of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. that held the crowd. "King was a leader who gave his life working for justice," said Muzammil H. Siddiqi, religious director of the Islamic Society of Orange County, in his sermon during Jumah, the weekly prayer service. "He stood for freedom, justice and equality among all. These are principles that we have to talk about as often as possible."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2004 | Daniel Yi, Times Staff Writer
As Martin Luther King Day approaches each year, Gloria Banks' phone rings with calls from students looking for someone to speak on the civil rights movement. "I ask them, 'Have you talked to your parents?' " Banks, president of the Orange County chapter of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People, told nearly 500 people gathered Monday at the Second Baptist Church of Santa Ana. The kids tell Banks that their parents are too young to remember, she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2010 | By Liesl Bradner
The year 1968 was a transformative one in American history, marred by the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy, bringing new dimension to the long-running civil rights struggle. "After 1968," a traveling exhibit on view at the California African American Museum in Exposition Park, challenged emerging artists born in or after that fateful year to create projects based on their interpretation of the civil rights period and its influence on future generations. The exhibit, originated by Atlanta's High Museum of Art, was conceived as a companion to "Road to Freedom," a collection of 160 civil rights photographs from 1956 to 1968 on display at the Skirball Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1989 | NANCY MILLS
The year is 1965. The place is the Theresa Hotel in Harlem. The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X are face to face. Their elbows are on the table between them, and their arms are locked in combat. Wait a minute! What are these two civil rights leaders doing in the same room together? One man was known for his nonviolent approach, the other for his fiery militancy. Is it possible they could have been friends despite their differences? And if they had joined forces, what might have happened to the civil rights movement?
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Mary Beckett of Philadelphia, Pa., climbed off a Greyhound bus into a blazing sun and gazed at the little brick church that three civil rights activists had visited the night they were murdered exactly 25 years ago. "It gives me chills," said Beckett, a 65-year-old black woman, one of hundreds who rode buses here from around the country and will leave today in a "freedom ride" caravan to New York via Washington. "I get goose bumps knowing that people could be so mean to take a person's life like that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2012 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Karl Fleming, a former Newsweek reporter who helped draw national attention to the civil rights movement in the 1960s - and risked his life covering it with perceptive stories about its major figures and the inequalities that fueled it - died Saturday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 84. The cause was related to a number of respiratory ailments, said his son Charles Fleming. Born and bred in the Jim Crow South, Fleming worked his way through small North Carolina newspapers to become chief of Newsweek's Atlanta bureau in 1961.
SPORTS
September 5, 2011 | By Mike DiGiovanna
For a "quality" start, it was sure lacking in quality. Dan Haren was rocked for 10 hits, including a home run and two doubles, in six innings, and the Angels right-hander still managed to limit the Seattle Mariners to three runs in a 7-3 victory Monday night. Style points are of no consequence to the Angels right now. As ugly and uninspiring as their win over the error-prone Mariners was, it moved them to within 2 1/2 games of the Texas Rangers in the American League West with 21 games to play.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2011 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
On a recent steamy Saturday evening, 11 members of Deborah Rae Wright's book club — black, white, Indian and Jewish women — gathered in her meticulously restored Craftsman home on the rundown west side of the Mississippi capital. The topic was 1960s-era Jackson and "The Help," the hit movie set here. As cicadas chirped and wine flowed, sensitive personal stories of the segregationist era and more recent racial affronts poured forth, and anger and frustration bubbled up. Lee Harper, a 51-year-old African American restaurant owner, recalled how her mother worked as a maid for white employers from sunup to sundown, six days a week, and hated every minute of it. "I cried a lot in the movie, mostly because I thought of her," said Harper.
SPORTS
June 15, 2011 | By Douglas Farmer
In his last three starts, Chad Billingsley has matched his performances in the previous nine — just not in a manner the Dodgers would prefer. After Wednesday's 7-2 loss to the Cincinnati Reds, the right-hander has given up 17 runs in his three June starts. That equals the number of runs he had given up in his previous nine outings. He yielded four runs in a win against Cincinnati on June 5, six runs in a loss to Colorado on Friday, and seven more in only four innings Wednesday afternoon at Dodger Stadium.
NEWS
May 12, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
President Obama mixed faith with immigration on Thursday as he again pushed for immigration reform, which he called a moral imperative that would require a movement to achieve. Speaking at an annual Latino prayer breakfast in Washington, Obama recalled the pivotal role of churches in helping bring about social change during the American Revolution and the civil-rights struggle in South. He pledged to continuing working with Congress but urged those at the breakfast to build a movement that would force immigration reform on the agenda.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2010 | By Liesl Bradner
The year 1968 was a transformative one in American history, marred by the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy, bringing new dimension to the long-running civil rights struggle. "After 1968," a traveling exhibit on view at the California African American Museum in Exposition Park, challenged emerging artists born in or after that fateful year to create projects based on their interpretation of the civil rights period and its influence on future generations. The exhibit, originated by Atlanta's High Museum of Art, was conceived as a companion to "Road to Freedom," a collection of 160 civil rights photographs from 1956 to 1968 on display at the Skirball Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1985 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, Times Staff Writer
William Thomas Sr., a 44-year-old Pacoima insurance agent, stopped in mid-conversation, pulled a set of dentures out of his mouth and said he would remember the spring of 1963 in Birmingham, Ala., for the rest of his life. "I was marching in the front of the line," he said with wide, serious eyes, his fingers rubbing his lip as he recalled the confrontation, which left him without his upper teeth. "The police billy-clubbed me."
TRAVEL
September 8, 1991 | KIM UPTON
When the National Civil Rights Museum opens in Memphis Sept. 28, on the site where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, it will offer the first comprehensive overview of the American civil rights movement in permanent exhibit form. Actually housed, in part, in the old Lorraine Motel where Dr. King was assassinated on April 4, 1968, the museum will contain exhibits highlighting significant events in the civil rights movement--from the 1954 Brown vs.
NATIONAL
January 19, 2010 | By Christi Parsons
President Obama convened a group of African American "elders" at the White House on Monday in the hopes of reminding young people that the struggle for civil rights is not so far in the American past. Before the event could get started, though, a guest leaned over to whisper a different message into his ear, one informed by more than a century of experience. "This must be the Lord's doing," 102-year-old Mabel Harvey told him, "because we've come a mighty long way." As he delivered his own message in honor of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. on the holiday marking his birthday, Obama and his administration emphasized the work yet to be done to realize the slain civil rights leader's vision.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2009 | Susan King
According to James Gavin's new biography, "Stormy Weather: The Life of Lena Horne," the legendary singer-actress was never comfortable being an icon. "As I say in the introduction of my book, icons are not allowed to be human beings," explains Gavin, a lifelong fan who interviewed Horne in 1994. "Once you step up on that pedestal . . . and everyone is scrutinizing your every move -- how do you function as a human being? You have to cover up mistakes you made."
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