Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRights Workers
IN THE NEWS

Rights Workers

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2013 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Olen Burrage, a farmer and Ku Klux Klan member who owned the Mississippi land where the bullet-riddled bodies of three civil rights workers were found buried in the 1960s, has died. He was 82. Burrage, who was acquitted on civil rights charges related to the murders, died March 15 at a medical center in Meridian, Miss., the McClain-Hays Funeral Home announced. The cause was not released. The Ku Klux Klan slaying became one of the most infamous episodes of the civil rights era and led to the 1965 passage of the Voting Rights Act, which outlawed discriminatory practices that kept African Americans from voting.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2013 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Olen Burrage, a farmer and Ku Klux Klan member who owned the Mississippi land where the bullet-riddled bodies of three civil rights workers were found buried in the 1960s, has died. He was 82. Burrage, who was acquitted on civil rights charges related to the murders, died March 15 at a medical center in Meridian, Miss., the McClain-Hays Funeral Home announced. The cause was not released. The Ku Klux Klan slaying became one of the most infamous episodes of the civil rights era and led to the 1965 passage of the Voting Rights Act, which outlawed discriminatory practices that kept African Americans from voting.
Advertisement
WORLD
November 10, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
Two of Russia 's most prominent human rights organizations say their work has been thrown into jeopardy by municipal efforts to evict them from their offices. For Human Rights and the Moscow Helsinki Group say they will fight to remain in their respective downtown offices. Both groups have occupied the same spaces for more than a decade at cut-rate rents brokered in a burst of liberalism following the collapse of the Soviet Union. The threat of eviction looms at a time when a dwindling community of human rights workers, locked in perpetual battle over grievances ranging from state violence in the restive Caucasus region to dismal conditions in Russian prisons, say they face increasing pressure and harassment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2012 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Karl Fleming, a former Newsweek reporter who helped draw national attention to the civil rights movement in the 1960s - and risked his life covering it with perceptive stories about its major figures and the inequalities that fueled it - died Saturday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 84. The cause was related to a number of respiratory ailments, said his son Charles Fleming. Born and bred in the Jim Crow South, Fleming worked his way through small North Carolina newspapers to become chief of Newsweek's Atlanta bureau in 1961.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2012 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Karl Fleming, a former Newsweek reporter who helped draw national attention to the civil rights movement in the 1960s - and risked his life covering it with perceptive stories about its major figures and the inequalities that fueled it - died Saturday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 84. The cause was related to a number of respiratory ailments, said his son Charles Fleming. Born and bred in the Jim Crow South, Fleming worked his way through small North Carolina newspapers to become chief of Newsweek's Atlanta bureau in 1961.
NEWS
June 23, 1989
Hundreds of civil rights activists boarded buses in Philadelphia, Miss., to retrace the trail of the 1960s Freedom Riders after honoring three civil rights workers who were slain near the Mississippi town 25 years ago. Some 470 pilgrims had arrived in a caravan of 13 buses from New York and Philadelphia, Pa., to attend ceremonies Wednesday honoring the three workers. The next day, 10 chartered buses left for Washington and additional ceremonies, with the caravan modeled on the North-to-South Freedom Rides of the 1960s.
NEWS
February 16, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
It was June 23, 1964, and President Johnson was given sharply differing opinions on the disappearance of three young civil rights workers in Mississippi, according to taped telephone conversations released by Johnson's presidential library in Austin. Before the day was over, the trio's burning car had been found. Their bodies were found 40 days later. Atty. Gen. Robert F.
NEWS
June 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
The families of three civil rights workers slain 25 years ago by Ku Klux Klansmen said they pressed President Bush today to back legislation to offset recent Supreme Court rulings "that have so badly eroded civil rights in this country," but he offered no commitment. "I believe the President doesn't want to commit himself in the way we need a commitment to the work that needs to be done to ensure the dignity of all citizens of the United States," said Rita Schwerner-Bender, the former wife of one of the slain young men, Michael Schwerner.
WORLD
July 30, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A female journalist facing 40 lashes for wearing trousers in public in violation of the country's strict Islamic code told a packed Khartoum courtroom she is resigning from a U.N. job that grants her immunity so she can launch a legal challenge to the law. Lubna Hussein was among 13 women arrested July 3 in a police raid on a popular Khartoum cafe for wearing trousers, considered indecent by the strict interpretation of Islamic law adopted by Sudan's...
WORLD
August 12, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
The bodies of an aid worker and her husband were found shot to death and stuffed into the trunk of their car today, a day after the couple was abducted at gunpoint from their office in Chechnya. Zarema Sadulayeva, the head of a nonprofit organization known as Save the Generation, had devoted her life to helping children traumatized and maimed in the two Chechen wars. She was particularly known for acquiring prosthetic limbs for the children, her colleagues said. Her husband, Alik Dzhabrailov, was a former rebel fighter.
WORLD
March 25, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
Critics of the Bahrain government have called for widespread rallies Friday in defiance of the country's recent imposition of martial law, raising the possibility of further violence nine days after a bloody crackdown on protesters and opposition leaders. Nine rallies are being planned around Manama, the capital, said Mohammed Meskati, president of the Bahrain Youth Society for Human Rights, which is serving as an information clearinghouse for organizers in hiding for fear of arrest.
OPINION
March 16, 2011 | By Brad Sherman
Supporters of the proposed free-trade agreement between the United States and South Korea argue that we should approve the pact to improve our economy and to reward an ally in a troubled region for its strong security relationship with the U.S., and to solidify these strong security ties with a stronger trade relationship. Though there is no doubt South Korea is a close ally, we need to ensure that the agreement does not undermine U.S. security and economic interests by benefiting North Korea.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Neshoba" is a troubling documentary, a film about fiery passions and murderous deeds that is disturbing in ways that go beyond what might be expected. Neshoba is a county in Mississippi where, on a June night in 1964, one of the events that defined the struggle for racial equality in the South took place. A trio of civil rights workers — James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner — were murdered by members of the Ku Klux Klan, their bodies found days later, buried in an earthen dam and exhibiting signs of torture and premature burial.
WORLD
November 10, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
Two of Russia 's most prominent human rights organizations say their work has been thrown into jeopardy by municipal efforts to evict them from their offices. For Human Rights and the Moscow Helsinki Group say they will fight to remain in their respective downtown offices. Both groups have occupied the same spaces for more than a decade at cut-rate rents brokered in a burst of liberalism following the collapse of the Soviet Union. The threat of eviction looms at a time when a dwindling community of human rights workers, locked in perpetual battle over grievances ranging from state violence in the restive Caucasus region to dismal conditions in Russian prisons, say they face increasing pressure and harassment.
WORLD
August 12, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
The bodies of an aid worker and her husband were found shot to death and stuffed into the trunk of their car today, a day after the couple was abducted at gunpoint from their office in Chechnya. Zarema Sadulayeva, the head of a nonprofit organization known as Save the Generation, had devoted her life to helping children traumatized and maimed in the two Chechen wars. She was particularly known for acquiring prosthetic limbs for the children, her colleagues said. Her husband, Alik Dzhabrailov, was a former rebel fighter.
WORLD
July 30, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A female journalist facing 40 lashes for wearing trousers in public in violation of the country's strict Islamic code told a packed Khartoum courtroom she is resigning from a U.N. job that grants her immunity so she can launch a legal challenge to the law. Lubna Hussein was among 13 women arrested July 3 in a police raid on a popular Khartoum cafe for wearing trousers, considered indecent by the strict interpretation of Islamic law adopted by Sudan's...
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
The killings on a dark Mississippi highway took less than five minutes. Now, 25 years later, the nation is about to relive them. On a hot and sticky night in 1964, a gang of police and Ku Klux Klansmen kidnaped and murdered three civil rights workers after a high-speed chase through the backwoods of Neshoba County. They pulled the young men from their car and shot them one by one, laughing as the victims hurtled backward into a ditch. Within the next two hours, Andrew Goodman, Michael Schwerner and James Chaney were buried in an earthen dam, and it was not until 44 days later that their badly decomposed bodies were discovered by FBI agents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1989 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, Times Staff Writer
More than 20 years ago, Jessie Kupers' father was in the thick of the struggle for civil rights in the South as a UCLA medical student looking into health problems of poor blacks. Saturday, Jessie, 13, boarded a freedom bus bound for Mississippi with a similar mission in mind. "I decided to go because racism is still present, and I want people to know that there are people who care," said Jessie, a student of the 32nd Street Performing Arts Magnet. A generation gap was apparent outside the Watts Towers as a contingent of young people departed for Philadelphia, Miss.
OPINION
May 23, 2009 | Nicholas Goldberg
The last time I was there, Philadelphia, Miss., was a sleepy town with low buildings and half-empty streets, the county seat of rural Neshoba County. I had arrived with Ben Chaney, the younger brother of James Chaney, one of three civil rights workers murdered there by the Ku Klux Klan in 1964. Now it was 1988, and Chaney and I walked warily through the streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2007 | From the Associated Press
NEW YORK -- Carolyn Goodman, the mother of one of three civil rights workers killed by the Ku Klux Klan in the "Mississippi Burning" case, died Friday. She was 91. Goodman, who lived to see a Klan leader convicted in her son's death two years ago, died at her Manhattan home, her son Jonathan said. The cause of death was not announced. Goodman's son Andrew was killed June 21, 1964, in central Mississippi's Neshoba County, along with fellow civil rights workers Michael Schwerner and James Chaney.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|