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Rigoberta Menchu

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1998
I was stunned in reading your defense of Rigoberta Menchu's elaborate tale of lies in her "autobiography" (editorial, Dec. 25). You collapse on the comfortable couch of political correctness when you describe her acts as "the embroidery of Menchu's words" and describe her as a "frail witness burdened by ideological zeal." The facts of this ruse are otherwise. Menchu had a boarding school education. Her Marxist rhetoric doesn't sound like that of a Guatemalan peasant. What is her reaction to all of this?
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NEWS
September 9, 2008 | Marisol Leon, Marisol Leon graduated from Yale in 2007 and spent a year working for a nongovernmental organization in Chiapas, Mexico.
'Think Ivy League," pleaded Mrs. Anderson, my English teacher. "Ivy League? What is that?" I remember thinking. I was in the seventh grade that day, a student at Mount Vernon Middle School in mid-city Los Angeles. I stood there in awkward disbelief as Joan Anderson explained the notion of elite colleges to me. I knew hardly anything about colleges: Neither of my parents finished high school. But my teacher understood that, and by the time I graduated from Mount Vernon, she had made certain that I was committed to going to college.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | RICHARD FAUSSET, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nobel laureate Rigoberta Menchu opened her appearance at Cal State Northridge Thursday with a prayer for peace in her native language, Quiche. In the speech that followed, the controversial Mayan leader avoided many of the complex problems facing Guatemala, as well as recent criticism of her methods. Instead, she offered the more universal logic of a prayer--a general call for respect among cultures.
WORLD
February 23, 2007 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
Rigoberta Menchu, the Nobel Peace Prize winner and Maya Indian who has long been a symbol of indigenous pride and defiance, has announced that she will be a candidate in Guatemala's presidential election. Menchu, 48, made the announcement after meeting late Wednesday with Nineth Montenegro, a respected human rights activist and leader of the Encounter for Guatemala political party. Menchu will be the party's candidate in the September election.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchu has long been a prophet without honor in her own land. One anthropologist spent a decade documenting discrepancies in her 1983 book, "I, Rigoberta Menchu." She has angered former allies--who accused her of collaborating with a right-wing administration--by helping the government convict the soldiers who massacred about a dozen people in 1995 in the village of Xaman.
MAGAZINE
February 27, 1994
Being Guatemalan-born (though raised in the United States since the age of 5), I was impressed with the time, effort and consideration given to Rigoberta Menchu, her goals and admirable quest ("Rigoberta Menchu and the New Mayan Pride," by Hector Tobar, Jan. 23). I have been to Guatemala several times and can attest to the blatant abuse, verbal and physical, of these poor people, even by my own family (we are middle-class Ladinos). I have read Menchu's book and believe all she says about the atrocities heaped upon the Guatemalan Indians.
NEWS
December 16, 1998 | Associated Press
The human rights foundation led by Rigoberta Menchu and the committee that awarded her the Nobel Peace Prize responded Tuesday to a report claiming key details of her autobiography were fabricated. Both said the controversy had no bearing on either her work or the prize. A new book by anthropologist David Stoll claims that "I, Rigoberta Menchu," first published in 1983, "cannot be the eyewitness account it purports to be" because she repeatedly describes "experiences she never had herself."
NEWS
November 12, 1995 | Reuters
Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchu's 22-month-old nephew, who was kidnaped by gunmen last weekend, was found safe in a town in the central Quiche province, Menchu said Saturday. Juan Carlos Velasquez Menchu was discovered on a park bench in the provincial capital, Santa Cruz del Quiche, late Thursday, Menchu told reporters. The child was snatched from the arms of his mother, Cristina, outside Menchu's Guatemala City home by two unidentified gunmen a week ago Saturday.
NEWS
November 17, 1995 | Reuters
Police arrested a sister and brother-in-law of Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchu on Thursday and charged them with faking the kidnaping of their own 22-month-old son. "We needed money, but we knew Rigoberta would never give us any, so we decided to say the child was kidnaped and ask for ransom money," Menchu's sister, Cristina Menchu, told reporters after her arrest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2000 | ROSEMARY CLANDOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rigoberta Menchu rose from a poor Mayan family in Guatemala, and through her struggle for the rights of indigenous people became a Nobel Peace Prize winner. On Thursday, she will address students, faculty and the general public at Cal State Northridge. Campus officials had been trying to bring Menchu to the San Fernando Valley for a long time, said Alberto Garcia, assistant professor of political science at CSUN.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2000 | KIMI YOSHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rigoberta Menchu Tum stood before a small group of supporters Sunday afternoon in Santa Ana and slowly pulled the microphone down to reach her less-than-5-foot frame. "I was born a little short," said Menchu Tum, the youngest person to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The audience chuckled at her first words, and that was all it took for her to warm the room.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | RICHARD FAUSSET, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nobel laureate Rigoberta Menchu opened her appearance at Cal State Northridge Thursday with a prayer for peace in her native language, Quiche. In the speech that followed, the controversial Mayan leader avoided many of the complex problems facing Guatemala, as well as recent criticism of her methods. Instead, she offered the more universal logic of a prayer--a general call for respect among cultures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2000 | ROSEMARY CLANDOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rigoberta Menchu rose from a poor Mayan family in Guatemala, and through her struggle for the rights of indigenous people became a Nobel Peace Prize winner. On Thursday, she will address students, faculty and the general public at Cal State Northridge. Campus officials had been trying to bring Menchu to the San Fernando Valley for a long time, said Alberto Garcia, assistant professor of political science at CSUN.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchu has long been a prophet without honor in her own land. One anthropologist spent a decade documenting discrepancies in her 1983 book, "I, Rigoberta Menchu." She has angered former allies--who accused her of collaborating with a right-wing administration--by helping the government convict the soldiers who massacred about a dozen people in 1995 in the village of Xaman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2000 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They met 19 years ago in war-torn Guatemala. She was an organizer of indigenous peasants and was being pursued by soldiers. He was an American writer who headed a church-based organization in Guatemala City and provided her refuge for a week.
NEWS
December 3, 1999 | From Reuters
Nobel laureate Rigoberta Menchu of Guatemala asked a Spanish court Thursday to charge four Guatemalan generals, including former dictator Efrain Rios Montt, with genocide. Menchu requested Spain's High Court, which secured the arrest of former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet in London last year, to prosecute Rios Montt and seven others for alleged involvement in a series of massacres in Guatemala in the 1980s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1998
Fiction is fiction, there is no way around it, and we now discover that Rigoberta Menchu, the winner of the 1992 Nobel Peace Prize, concocted many of the events in the autobiography that brought her fame and adulation. But that does not lessen our need to learn what happened in the bloody highlands of Guatemala during the Central American wars of the 1980s.
OPINION
December 27, 1998 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn is co-author with Jeffrey St. Clair of "Whiteout: The CIA, Drugs and the Press," published this year by Verso, which is also Rigoberta Menchu's English-language publisher
Few disclosures offer keener pleasure than the news that those one had previously believed to be of impregnable reputation have, after all, feet of clay. Such now appears to be the fate of Rigoberta Menchu, the Guatemalan Mayan woman who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1992. The slurs are cast not on her conduct but on her powers of recollection and, so the charge is leveled, upon her presumptive capacity for distortion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1998
I was stunned in reading your defense of Rigoberta Menchu's elaborate tale of lies in her "autobiography" (editorial, Dec. 25). You collapse on the comfortable couch of political correctness when you describe her acts as "the embroidery of Menchu's words" and describe her as a "frail witness burdened by ideological zeal." The facts of this ruse are otherwise. Menchu had a boarding school education. Her Marxist rhetoric doesn't sound like that of a Guatemalan peasant. What is her reaction to all of this?
OPINION
December 27, 1998 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn is co-author with Jeffrey St. Clair of "Whiteout: The CIA, Drugs and the Press," published this year by Verso, which is also Rigoberta Menchu's English-language publisher
Few disclosures offer keener pleasure than the news that those one had previously believed to be of impregnable reputation have, after all, feet of clay. Such now appears to be the fate of Rigoberta Menchu, the Guatemalan Mayan woman who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1992. The slurs are cast not on her conduct but on her powers of recollection and, so the charge is leveled, upon her presumptive capacity for distortion.
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