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Rigoberta Menchu Tum

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NEWS
January 19, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
In an elaborate ceremony mixing tears and laughter, Nobel Peace Prize laureate Rigoberta Menchu Tum was married and buried her baby in the village of San Pedro Jocopilas, a highlands town. Menchu, who won the prize in 1992 for her activism against the slaughter of the nation's Indian majority during a 35-year civil war, returned from Mexico City for the religious ceremony. She married Angel Canil in a Mayan ceremony in Mexico City three years ago.
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NEWS
December 1, 2000 | From Reuters
Lawyers for Guatemalan Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchu on Thursday defended her attempt to have three former dictators tried in Spain for racial genocide against Guatemala's indigenous Maya population. Spain's High Court previously ruled that it had grounds to prosecute former Chilean ruler Augusto Pinochet and Argentina's ex-military leaders on similar charges, and Menchu said the same rules apply because genocide is a "universal crime."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1992
The Guatemalan armed forces' claim that Rigoberta Menchu Tum's work for peace and reconciliation "is tied to certain groups that have endangered Guatemala" ("Latin Indian Activist Wins Nobel Prize," Oct. 17) is true. Any movement that works for peace in that country is a danger. To work for peace is subversive because it is a condemnation of things as they are. If Guatemala has been "disparaged," as the army spokesman said, it has been by the armed forces, not by this woman. Guatemala ranks as a human rights pariah in the hemisphere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2000 | KIMI YOSHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rigoberta Menchu Tum stood before a small group of supporters Sunday afternoon in Santa Ana and slowly pulled the microphone down to reach her less-than-5-foot frame. "I was born a little short," said Menchu Tum, the youngest person to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The audience chuckled at her first words, and that was all it took for her to warm the room.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rigoberta Menchu Tum, the Guatemalan Indian human rights activist awarded last year's Nobel Peace Prize, voiced strong support Thursday for efforts to grant temporary protected status to tens of thousands of Guatemalan exiles living in the United States. "Conditions are not right for many of my compatriots to return home," Menchu said during an interview in Los Angeles, home to the nation's largest Guatemalan refugee community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2000 | KIMI YOSHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rigoberta Menchu Tum stood before a small group of supporters Sunday afternoon in Santa Ana and slowly pulled the microphone down to reach her less-than-5-foot frame. "I was born a little short," said Menchu Tum, the youngest person to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The audience chuckled at her first words, and that was all it took for her to warm the room.
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guatemalan Indian rights activist Rigoberta Menchu Tum, whose parents were among tens of thousands of Indians killed in her country's ongoing civil war, won the 1992 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday. The award, worth $1.2 million, comes on the 500th anniversary of the arrival of Christopher Columbus in the Americas. Menchu, a 33-year-old Mayan Indian, called it a tribute to all Indians throughout the Americas.
NEWS
December 1, 2000 | From Reuters
Lawyers for Guatemalan Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchu on Thursday defended her attempt to have three former dictators tried in Spain for racial genocide against Guatemala's indigenous Maya population. Spain's High Court previously ruled that it had grounds to prosecute former Chilean ruler Augusto Pinochet and Argentina's ex-military leaders on similar charges, and Menchu said the same rules apply because genocide is a "universal crime."
NEWS
November 17, 1995 | Reuters
Police arrested a sister and brother-in-law of Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchu on Thursday and charged them with faking the kidnaping of their own 22-month-old son. "We needed money, but we knew Rigoberta would never give us any, so we decided to say the child was kidnaped and ask for ransom money," Menchu's sister, Cristina Menchu, told reporters after her arrest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2000 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They met 19 years ago in war-torn Guatemala. She was an organizer of indigenous peasants and was being pursued by soldiers. He was an American writer who headed a church-based organization in Guatemala City and provided her refuge for a week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2000 | KIMI YOSHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rigoberta Menchu Tum stood before a small group of supporters Sunday afternoon in Santa Ana and slowly pulled the microphone down to reach her less-than-5-foot frame. "I was born a little short," said Menchu Tum, the youngest person to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The audience chuckled at her first words, and that was all it took for her to warm the room.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2000 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They met 19 years ago in war-torn Guatemala. She was an organizer of indigenous peasants and was being pursued by soldiers. He was an American writer who headed a church-based organization in Guatemala City and provided her refuge for a week.
NEWS
January 19, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
In an elaborate ceremony mixing tears and laughter, Nobel Peace Prize laureate Rigoberta Menchu Tum was married and buried her baby in the village of San Pedro Jocopilas, a highlands town. Menchu, who won the prize in 1992 for her activism against the slaughter of the nation's Indian majority during a 35-year civil war, returned from Mexico City for the religious ceremony. She married Angel Canil in a Mayan ceremony in Mexico City three years ago.
NEWS
November 17, 1995 | Reuters
Police arrested a sister and brother-in-law of Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchu on Thursday and charged them with faking the kidnaping of their own 22-month-old son. "We needed money, but we knew Rigoberta would never give us any, so we decided to say the child was kidnaped and ask for ransom money," Menchu's sister, Cristina Menchu, told reporters after her arrest.
MAGAZINE
January 23, 1994 | HECTOR TOBAR, Hector Tobar, a former Times staff writer, is working on a novel set in the Central American neighborhoods of Downtown L.A. His last article for the magazine was a profile of Los Angeles County Supervisor Gloria Molina.
A society of Indian holy men meets regularly in a Guatemala City apartment to study the Mayan calendar, a 2,500-year-old timekeeping system that is at the center of their religion. In recent years, their reading of the calendar has told them that an ancient prophecy is about to come true: "The time of darkness" is coming to an end. The Mayan people, exploited for five centuries, second-class citizens in their own land, will soon enter an age of "clarity and brightness."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rigoberta Menchu Tum, the Guatemalan Indian human rights activist awarded last year's Nobel Peace Prize, voiced strong support Thursday for efforts to grant temporary protected status to tens of thousands of Guatemalan exiles living in the United States. "Conditions are not right for many of my compatriots to return home," Menchu said during an interview in Los Angeles, home to the nation's largest Guatemalan refugee community.
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Indian rights activist Rigoberta Menchu accepted the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, calling it a tribute to exploited people in her native Guatemala and around the world. "Today we must fight for a better world, without poverty, without racism, with peace," said Menchu. The 33-year-old laureate won the $973,000 prize for her efforts to bring peace and reconciliation to Guatemala.
MAGAZINE
January 23, 1994 | HECTOR TOBAR, Hector Tobar, a former Times staff writer, is working on a novel set in the Central American neighborhoods of Downtown L.A. His last article for the magazine was a profile of Los Angeles County Supervisor Gloria Molina.
A society of Indian holy men meets regularly in a Guatemala City apartment to study the Mayan calendar, a 2,500-year-old timekeeping system that is at the center of their religion. In recent years, their reading of the calendar has told them that an ancient prophecy is about to come true: "The time of darkness" is coming to an end. The Mayan people, exploited for five centuries, second-class citizens in their own land, will soon enter an age of "clarity and brightness."
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Indian rights activist Rigoberta Menchu accepted the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, calling it a tribute to exploited people in her native Guatemala and around the world. "Today we must fight for a better world, without poverty, without racism, with peace," said Menchu. The 33-year-old laureate won the $973,000 prize for her efforts to bring peace and reconciliation to Guatemala.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1992
The Guatemalan armed forces' claim that Rigoberta Menchu Tum's work for peace and reconciliation "is tied to certain groups that have endangered Guatemala" ("Latin Indian Activist Wins Nobel Prize," Oct. 17) is true. Any movement that works for peace in that country is a danger. To work for peace is subversive because it is a condemnation of things as they are. If Guatemala has been "disparaged," as the army spokesman said, it has been by the armed forces, not by this woman. Guatemala ranks as a human rights pariah in the hemisphere.
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