Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRihab Rashid Taha
IN THE NEWS

Rihab Rashid Taha

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 7, 1995 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For four years, Dr. Rihab Rashid Taha would turn on the tears and even throw small tantrums in sessions with U.N. investigators in Baghdad. No, no, no, she would protest, Iraq never, ever developed biological weapons. Earlier this year, she stormed out of one session weeping. "It was a role she played rather well," recalled one U.N. scientist. "But we knew she was lying." And recently, Taha finally had to come clean. With no sign of remorse, she coldly admitted to the same U.N.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 7, 1995 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For four years, Dr. Rihab Rashid Taha would turn on the tears and even throw small tantrums in sessions with U.N. investigators in Baghdad. No, no, no, she would protest, Iraq never, ever developed biological weapons. Earlier this year, she stormed out of one session weeping. "It was a role she played rather well," recalled one U.N. scientist. "But we knew she was lying." And recently, Taha finally had to come clean. With no sign of remorse, she coldly admitted to the same U.N.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 13, 2003 | Eric Slater and Mark Fineman, Times Staff Writers
The new civilian administrator of Iraq arrived in this chaos-choked capital Monday, faced with the daunting task of restoring everything from security to electricity, a job many here and in Washington say has not been handled effectively. As looted buildings burned and gunmen continued to roam freely, L. Paul Bremer III landed at Baghdad's international airport Monday afternoon to head all political and reconstruction efforts in the country.
NATIONAL
November 20, 2005 | Bob Drogin and John Goetz, Special to The Times
The German intelligence officials responsible for one of the most important informants on Saddam Hussein's suspected weapons of mass destruction say that the Bush administration and the CIA repeatedly exaggerated his claims during the run-up to the war in Iraq. Five senior officials from Germany's Federal Intelligence Service, or BND, said in interviews with The Times that they warned U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|