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BUSINESS
April 29, 1989
Unilever Drops Faberge Deal: Unilever, the European consumer products conglomerate, said it has dropped plans to purchase the Faberge and Elizabeth Arden lines of toiletries, cosmetics and fragrances for $1.55 billion from Riklis Family Corp. Negotiations broke down because the Riklis group sought "significant changes in the structure and terms of the transaction, which would have involved Unilever in substantial additional costs," according to Unilever United States Inc., the U.S. arm of the British-Dutch household and consumer products giant.
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BUSINESS
April 29, 1989
Unilever Drops Faberge Deal: Unilever, the European consumer products conglomerate, said it has dropped plans to purchase the Faberge and Elizabeth Arden lines of toiletries, cosmetics and fragrances for $1.55 billion from Riklis Family Corp. Negotiations broke down because the Riklis group sought "significant changes in the structure and terms of the transaction, which would have involved Unilever in substantial additional costs," according to Unilever United States Inc., the U.S. arm of the British-Dutch household and consumer products giant.
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BUSINESS
June 14, 1988 | From Reuters
Tobacco and liquor giant American Brands Inc. said Monday that it is selling its E-II Holdings Inc. for about $1.2 billion but will buy back five of E-II's home and office products companies for $645 million. American Brands said it was making the moves to concentrate on three new core businesses--home products, office products and hardware.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1988 | From Reuters
Tobacco and liquor giant American Brands Inc. said Monday that it is selling its E-II Holdings Inc. for about $1.2 billion but will buy back five of E-II's home and office products companies for $645 million. American Brands said it was making the moves to concentrate on three new core businesses--home products, office products and hardware.
NEWS
February 10, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Faberge Inc. of the United States is selling its toiletries, cosmetics and fragrance businesses, including Elizabeth Arden, to the Unilever Group for $1.55 billion in cash, it was announced today. The deal will give Unilever, the British-Dutch consumer products giant, ownership of such brand names as Faberge, Elizabeth Arden, Brut, Aqua Net, Chloe and Lagerfeld. Faberge and its Elizabeth Arden subsidiary are owned by Meshulam Riklis' Riklis Family Corp. and have headquarters in New York.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
Unilever, the British-Dutch consumer products giant, has agreed to buy the Faberge and Elizabeth Arden lines of toiletries, cosmetics and fragrances for $1.55 billion, Unilever and Faberge announced today. The new deal between Faberge's owner, Riklis Family Corp., and Unilever United States Inc., the holding company for the group's American operations, is expected to be completed within 30 days.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1989 | From Reuters
The Anglo-Dutch Unilever group said today that it will pay $1.55 billion for the cosmetics and toiletries businesses of U.S.-based Faberge and Elizabeth Arden in a deal that will make it a leader in personal products sales. Unilever PLC-NV is the world's second-largest consumer goods company, with interests from foods to detergents. The cash deal will be one of the biggest in a series of recent trans-Atlantic takeovers by European firms.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1988 | From Reuters
American Brands said Thursday that Brooke Partners LP intends to acquire more than $15 million worth of American Brands' voting stock and may acquire more than 50% of its voting securities. The cigarette and liquor giant said Brooke Partners stated its intentions in a federal antitrust filing. The announcement was made Thursday evening after the stock market closed. American Brands dropped 37.5 cents to $48.375. It has about 110 million shares outstanding.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1990 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
T hey were the corporate cowboys of the 1980s--entrepreneurs who emerged from nowhere to take on established companies and corporate chieftains. The raiders often claimed to be playing a Robin Hood role, wresting undervalued assets from entrenched managers and redistributing the wealth to shareholders. Their critics described them as Jesse James-style bandits, virtually stealing assets to enrich themselves.
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