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WORLD
May 16, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Futoshi Toba arrived at the hillside Buddhist temple just after dawn, hours before the other mourners, on the April day he bid farewell to his wife, Yumi. He found the small urn containing her ashes among a solemn sea of containers for the 1,500 residents of Rikuzentakata who died in Japan's devastating earthquake and tsunami. Toba, 46, laid a white chrysanthemum next to his wife's remains. He said a brief prayer, and made her a promise. Holding back tears, he vowed to raise the couple's two young sons to become good men. "I swore I would do the best job I could in rebuilding this town," he said later, "but I said this place would never be the same without her. " Toba is mayor of the town of 23,000 in northern Japan, a job he took barely a month before an unstoppable wall of water turned the seaside community into a wasteland of shattered lives and scattered wreckage.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2013 | By Kate Mather
A 20-foot boat that washed ashore earlier this month in Northern California has been confirmed as the first debris from the 2011 Japanese tsunami to reach the state. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, working with the Japanese Consulate in San Francisco, was able to confirm Thursday that the boat found April 7 in Crescent City was from Rikuzentakata, Japan, said agency spokeswoman Keeley Belva. Local authorities reported the boat to NOAA after it was discovered by beachgoers, Belva said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2013 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
The barnacle-covered boat with Japanese lettering spent 758 days at sea before it drifted onto a Northern California beach. Nearly three weeks after the 20-foot boat washed ashore in Crescent City, about 20 miles south of the Oregon border, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration determined it was from the 2011 tsunami, the first confirmed debris to reach California. Though official word didn't come until Thursday, a Humboldt State University professor used Facebook to connect the dots shortly after beachgoers discovered the boat April 7. Lori Dengler, who helped examine the craft, recognized the lettering after some of the barnacles were scraped away, the Del Norte Triplicate reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2013 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
The barnacle-covered boat with Japanese lettering spent 758 days at sea before it drifted onto a Northern California beach. Nearly three weeks after the 20-foot boat washed ashore in Crescent City, about 20 miles south of the Oregon border, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration determined it was from the 2011 tsunami, the first confirmed debris to reach California. Though official word didn't come until Thursday, a Humboldt State University professor used Facebook to connect the dots shortly after beachgoers discovered the boat April 7. Lori Dengler, who helped examine the craft, recognized the lettering after some of the barnacles were scraped away, the Del Norte Triplicate reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2013 | By Kate Mather
A 20-foot boat that washed ashore earlier this month in Northern California has been confirmed as the first debris from the 2011 Japanese tsunami to reach the state. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, working with the Japanese Consulate in San Francisco, was able to confirm Thursday that the boat found April 7 in Crescent City was from Rikuzentakata, Japan, said agency spokeswoman Keeley Belva. Local authorities reported the boat to NOAA after it was discovered by beachgoers, Belva said.
WORLD
April 2, 2011 | By Julie Makinen and Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
After declaring he would convene a national council on rebuilding within 10 days, Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan visited the devastated city of Rikuzentakata on Saturday as well as the site serving as the emergency staging headquarters for the Fukushima nuclear crisis. At the same time, U.S. and Japanese forces launched a massive effort to locate the bodies of more than 16,000 people still listed as missing three weeks after the giant March 11 earthquake and tsunami. Kan said resolving the crisis at the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power complex would take a while, but he pledged to do "whatever it takes to win the battle" there and brushed off talk that Tokyo Electric Power Co., which runs the facility, would be nationalized.
WORLD
April 2, 2011 | By Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan on Saturday visited tsunami survivors and workers trying to bring the Fukushima nuclear facility under control as the plant's operator said highly radioactive water was leaking from a pit near a reactor into the ocean. Kan was briefed by city officials in the northern city of Rikuzentakata and later met with 250 disaster victims at a school. "I promise that the government will fully assist survivors to regain a normal life," Kan, dressed in a blue workman's-style jacket and pants, told reporters at the school.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
Naoya Hatakeyama, well known in Japan for his large-scale photographs of man's impact on natural settings, can trace his fascination with altered landscapes to his childhood growing up around limestone quarries in the town of Rikuzentakata, where his father worked in a cement factory. "He is drawn to places in flux, where some sort of industrial situation is happening," noted Lisa Sutcliffe, assistant curator at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, where Hatakeyama's first solo exhibition in the U.S., "Natural Stories," runs through Nov. 4. Organized in conjunction with the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, the photos span his career during the last three decades.
WORLD
March 12, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
The death toll from Friday's 8.9 earthquake in Japan exceeded 687 as of Saturday midnight, according to a police tally reported by Kyodo News Agency, and the number of casualties was expected to increase. The news agency reported that an additional 200 to 300 unidentified bodies were transferred to Sendai, Miyagi prefecture. About 300,000 residents had been evacuated Saturday in five prefectures, including Iwate and Fukushima, the news agency reported, citing the Japanese National Police Agency.
WORLD
April 12, 2011 | By Kenji Hall and John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Japanese nuclear regulatory officials Tuesday raised the severity rating at the earthquake- and tsunami-damaged Fukushima Daiichi power plant to the highest level by international standards, equaling the 1986 Chernobyl meltdown in the former Soviet Union. The country's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency announced that because of the amount of radioactive material released from the plant after the magnitude 9 earthquake a month ago, the rating would be changed to level 7, a "major accident" on the International Atomic Energy Agency's scale, up from a level 5, an "accident with wider consequences.
WORLD
May 16, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Futoshi Toba arrived at the hillside Buddhist temple just after dawn, hours before the other mourners, on the April day he bid farewell to his wife, Yumi. He found the small urn containing her ashes among a solemn sea of containers for the 1,500 residents of Rikuzentakata who died in Japan's devastating earthquake and tsunami. Toba, 46, laid a white chrysanthemum next to his wife's remains. He said a brief prayer, and made her a promise. Holding back tears, he vowed to raise the couple's two young sons to become good men. "I swore I would do the best job I could in rebuilding this town," he said later, "but I said this place would never be the same without her. " Toba is mayor of the town of 23,000 in northern Japan, a job he took barely a month before an unstoppable wall of water turned the seaside community into a wasteland of shattered lives and scattered wreckage.
WORLD
April 2, 2011 | By Julie Makinen and Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
After declaring he would convene a national council on rebuilding within 10 days, Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan visited the devastated city of Rikuzentakata on Saturday as well as the site serving as the emergency staging headquarters for the Fukushima nuclear crisis. At the same time, U.S. and Japanese forces launched a massive effort to locate the bodies of more than 16,000 people still listed as missing three weeks after the giant March 11 earthquake and tsunami. Kan said resolving the crisis at the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power complex would take a while, but he pledged to do "whatever it takes to win the battle" there and brushed off talk that Tokyo Electric Power Co., which runs the facility, would be nationalized.
WORLD
April 2, 2011 | By Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan on Saturday visited tsunami survivors and workers trying to bring the Fukushima nuclear facility under control as the plant's operator said highly radioactive water was leaking from a pit near a reactor into the ocean. Kan was briefed by city officials in the northern city of Rikuzentakata and later met with 250 disaster victims at a school. "I promise that the government will fully assist survivors to regain a normal life," Kan, dressed in a blue workman's-style jacket and pants, told reporters at the school.
WORLD
March 13, 2011 | By Laura King, Mark Magnier and Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
The number of missing and feared dead in Japan's epic earthquake soared Sunday as a reeling nation struggled to contain an unprecedented nuclear crisis, pluck people in tsunami-inundated areas to safety, quell raging blazes and provide aid to hundreds of thousands of frightened people left homeless and dazed. A police chief in the battered Miyagi prefecture told disaster relief officials that he expected the death toll to rise to 10,000 in his prefecture alone, the Kyodo News Agency said.
WORLD
March 21, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
They covered the body with a child's blanket, a fluffy blue-green cloak decorated with white lilies. Beneath the cloth was a man, maybe in his 40s, missing his right arm from the elbow, a final insult to one of the countless victims of this agricultural town's tsunami nightmare. On a warm late-winter morning, four recovery workers bent low, slowly lifting the corpse in silent deference, before splashing through the muck and ooze of the rural rice field toward the road. On Sunday, the ritual was repeated again and again, at least a dozen times, as teams ?
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