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Riley Weston

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2004 | Scott Collins, Times Staff Writer
Riley Weston vanished from Hollywood six years ago, after her bosses learned she was not the teenage writing and acting prodigy they thought she was -- a cute, eccentric girl who reached into her backpack and pulled out uncommonly polished scripts. Instead, she was a 32-year-old divorcee who fibbed about her age to keep working in an industry forever seeking youth. After the scandal broke, her agents dumped her and the Walt Disney Co. let her $500,000 TV development deal lapse.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2004 | Scott Collins, Times Staff Writer
Riley Weston vanished from Hollywood six years ago, after her bosses learned she was not the teenage writing and acting prodigy they thought she was -- a cute, eccentric girl who reached into her backpack and pulled out uncommonly polished scripts. Instead, she was a 32-year-old divorcee who fibbed about her age to keep working in an industry forever seeking youth. After the scandal broke, her agents dumped her and the Walt Disney Co. let her $500,000 TV development deal lapse.
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BUSINESS
October 16, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 32-year-old actress who passed herself off as a teenager to get hired in the youth-obsessed entertainment industry acknowledged Thursday that she deceived her agents, attorneys and the producers of the series on which she served as a staff writer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1998
When the American Film Institute earlier this year selected its 100 greatest U.S. films of the century, it touched off a huge controversy among critics and the public, who were not shy about expressing their own choices for the list. When films are nominated for the Oscar each year, officials at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences know full well that the nominations will stir widespread debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1998 | SHAWN HUBLER
So, we're, like, sitting around the TV, watching one of those dramas about kids. Serious kids. Kids who talk dramatically. Like this. Kids who look like they're 25 and are stunningly beautiful, but all the other stunningly beautiful kids treat them like dweebs, except when they're having sex with their high school teachers or each other or each other's parents. Because that's how life is now. On TV. For kids. So we wonder, because, compared to these TV kids, our kids are, like, children.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1998 | ARTHUR AXELMAN
It started a year ago with a call from a bright young man named Brad Sexton. He asked if my company was interested in a television series. I said I would read anything good. He said he was a manager of writers and that his client Riley Weston had written a spec pilot for a one-hour series called "Holliman's Way." Now, nobody really writes a spec pilot script, but I read it immediately and was stunned by how professional and knowing it was. I called Sexton and asked, "Can I meet the writer?"
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1998
When the American Film Institute earlier this year selected its 100 greatest U.S. films of the century, it touched off a huge controversy among critics and the public, who were not shy about expressing their own choices for the list. When films are nominated for the Oscar each year, officials at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences know full well that the nominations will stir widespread debate.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 19-year-old writing phenom recently signed by the Walt Disney Co. to a six-figure television producing deal has been unmasked as a 32-year-old actress, leaving many of those associated with her during the last year feeling duped. Riley Weston, recently named by Entertainment Weekly as one of the 100 most creative people in the business, could not be reached for comment. She apparently pretended to be a teenager to give her an edge in youth-obsessed Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1998 | MARC PARISER
OK, so I guess I get dragged into this public discussion too. Riley Weston seems to have found the formula for doing what most TV writers would like to do: get a lot of industry attention. For the record, I am that ex-Metropolitan agent to which my friend, Arthur Axelman, made veiled reference ("She Fooled Us, but Don't Discount Her Writing," Counterpunch, Nov. 2). So, let's set the record straight, at least that part of the record to which I am a party.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2001 | JANA J. MONJI and \f7
In "2nd Wind," Gene Bua and Toni Bull Bua's rock musical at the Gene Bua Acting for Life Theatre, the head-miked actors sing to canned music at a decibel level better suited for a stadium than the smallish venue. They scream life-affirming messages, drowning out the pathos of the true-life experiences that inspired this loud, long and predictable piece.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1998 | ARTHUR AXELMAN
It started a year ago with a call from a bright young man named Brad Sexton. He asked if my company was interested in a television series. I said I would read anything good. He said he was a manager of writers and that his client Riley Weston had written a spec pilot for a one-hour series called "Holliman's Way." Now, nobody really writes a spec pilot script, but I read it immediately and was stunned by how professional and knowing it was. I called Sexton and asked, "Can I meet the writer?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1998 | SHAWN HUBLER
So, we're, like, sitting around the TV, watching one of those dramas about kids. Serious kids. Kids who talk dramatically. Like this. Kids who look like they're 25 and are stunningly beautiful, but all the other stunningly beautiful kids treat them like dweebs, except when they're having sex with their high school teachers or each other or each other's parents. Because that's how life is now. On TV. For kids. So we wonder, because, compared to these TV kids, our kids are, like, children.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 32-year-old actress who passed herself off as a teenager to get hired in the youth-obsessed entertainment industry acknowledged Thursday that she deceived her agents, attorneys and the producers of the series on which she served as a staff writer.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 19-year-old writing phenom recently signed by the Walt Disney Co. to a six-figure television producing deal has been unmasked as a 32-year-old actress, leaving many of those associated with her during the last year feeling duped. Riley Weston, recently named by Entertainment Weekly as one of the 100 most creative people in the business, could not be reached for comment. She apparently pretended to be a teenager to give her an edge in youth-obsessed Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even in an era in which Hollywood seems obsessed with finding baby-faced TV and film writers, the cocktail hour reception at the Writers Guild of America must have been sobering to veteran scriptwriters. The guild's newest award-winning writers drank soft drinks and ate cookie hors d'oeuvres that were tethered to balloons. And there was no need for a single one of them to shave any years off their ages: Each was only 10.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1999 | FRANK TORREZ
Today "Today": Products for pets; swimsuits; musician David Jack; ice dancers Usova and Platov, 5 a.m. KNBC. 625914 "John McLaughlin's One on One": Appeal of Shakespeare, 2:30 p.m. KCET. 11778 "Evans, Novak, Hunt & Shields": Kosovo, 2:30 p.m. CNN. 691198 "Firing Line": What does the Clinton trial tell us about the mood of America? 3 p.m. KCET. 87223 "Tony Brown's Journal": Legends of comedy: Cosby, Pryor, Gregory, Kirby, Russell, 3:30 p.m. KCET.
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