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Rin Tin Tin

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend Susan Orlean Simon & Schuster: 288 pp., $26.99 They called him the Dog Wonder, the Mastermind Dog, America's Greatest Movie Dog. He was listed in the Los Angeles phone book, made more money than his human costars and actually came unnervingly close to winning the first Academy Award for actor. He was Rin Tin Tin and, as Susan Orlean puts it, "He was something you could dream about. He could leap twelve feet, and he could leap through time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Rebecca Keegan
Tuna, a Chiweenie with an overbite and more than 700,000 followers on Instagram, was there. So were Lassie, Rin Tin Tin, Beethoven, Marley, Toto and several other dogs of renown. The canine A-list had gathered in Hollywood in February to celebrate one of their own. Yes, they had also come because their trainers were tossing bits of hot dog onto the red carpet, but really, the main attraction was Mr. Peabody, the hyper-intelligent, time-traveling beagle from the 1960s cartoon shorts "Peabody's Improbable History," who was getting his paw prints enshrined at the TCL Chinese Theatre.
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OPINION
April 24, 2005 | Joel Stein
Of all the things I will be held accountable for in hell, this will surprise me the least: Writing a part for an 11-year-old in my sitcom pilot. When Satan shows me the "E! True Hollywood Story" with the innocent child we helped turn into a 19-year-old in rehab, performing with a bad heavy metal band and divorced from a Playmate, I can only pray I'll have made a truckload of syndication money off him.
TRAVEL
July 7, 2013 | By Rosemary McClure
Oh, the joy of being a dog. Especially a dog with wealthy parents, um, I mean owners. More than a decade has passed since luxury hotels began throwing welcome parties for platinum-card-carrying pet owners . But with pets a $50-billion-a-year industry, it was only a matter of time before they began offering dining menus that had gone to the dogs, literally. Chefs at some of America's toniest hotels have hunkered down in their kitchens to create pets-only room-service delights: ranch-raised New Zealand venison, steak and eggs scrambled with aged Tillamook cheddar, wild Chinook salmon with brown rice.
NEWS
April 13, 1992 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Brown, one of the classically handsome, all-American faces to come out of Hollywood in the 1940s--but probably better known as Lt. Rip Masters on the TV series "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin"--died Saturday at his home in Woodland Hills. A daughter, Carol Thies, said her father was 72 when he died of the complications of lung cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1991 | KATHLEEN WILLIAMS and * HISTORY: The Glen Tavern Inn opened in 1911 and has been booking guests ever since, except for a period during World War II when the government leased it to house clerical staff from Point Mugu Naval Air Station. and * LOCATION: 134 N. Mill St., Santa Paula. and * HOURS: Open to the public. Restaurant open for banquets only.
After a fire took Santa Paula's Petroilia Hotel in 1903, the only lodging was a modest boardinghouse. Then a group of prominent Santa Paulans felt that it was time their city acquired a grand hotel. They hired Los Angeles architects Sumner Hunt and Silas Burns to design a building in the manner of an English inn. The hotel that resulted has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places and named a county landmark.
NEWS
February 17, 1995 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Brad Pitt is everywhere. On the cover of People, anointed "The Sexiest Man Alive!" Sporting tight leopard-skin jeans in the pages of Vanity Fair (which purports to explain "Why Brad Pitt Is Hollywood's Ultimate Sex Symbol"). He's even on the cover of Newsweek. I don't get it. He's got squinty eyes and mangy facial hair. In some interviews he mumbles like a postmodernist James Dean and chain-smokes. He's skinny. My wife thinks Brad Pitt is gorgeous. She says I am crazy. And jealous.
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | PANCHO DOLL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carrion eaters have a tough time maintaining a good public image. Consider a 1926 film to be shown Sunday at the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area that vilifies the California condor. It's a Rin Tin Tin film that pits Warner Bros. best known bowser against a sheep killing, baby snatching, villainous member of the vulture family.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
With a dog at her feet and an advance copy of her book "Rin Tin Tin" on the table, Susan Orlean sips coffee in the backyard of the Los Angeles house she now calls home. In September, the New Yorker staff writer, whose book "The Orchid Thief" was the (sort of) basis for the film "Adaptation," left rural New York behind. For the next year, she, her husband and son will be calling themselves Angelenos, thanks partly to the movie-star dog and Orlean's responsibilities as a working mother. "I started being inflamed with the idea that Rin Tin Tin was a great story, but I didn't know what the story was, of course," says Orlean, who begins all her work with lively curiosity before plunging into the unknown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1989
This country has its priorities upside down. Fly the flags at half-mast for Lucille Ball? We should have done that earlier when all those sailors died. What is next, Rin Tin Tin? STEPHEN MATZNER Culver City
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
If you weren't watching the Colbert Report on Tuesday night, you missed Stephen Colbert poking fun at author Malcolm Gladwell's shock of curly hair. Gladwell, for his part, looked kind of uncomfortable, and didn't even try to make a hair joke in return. The occasion was "The Big New Yorker Book of Dogs," to which Gladwell wrote the foreword. Gladwell doesn't have a dog, but he likes them, and he's a New Yorker writer -- so there he was, shifting uneasily in the Colbert hot seat.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Movies were in their infancy when British director Cecil Hepworth put his family's pet, a collie named Blair, in the 1905 thriller "Rescued by Rover. " Not only is Blair credited with being the first canine film star, but "Rescued by Rover" proved so popular that the film had to be reshot twice because the negatives wore out after so many prints were made. And so began a great love affair between movie audiences and dogs. Since Blair's screen debut, fans have fallen for the faith, devotion and sheer beauty of such four-legged superstars as Rin Tin Tin and the dogs who played Lassie Toto, Asta and Benji.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2011
The Age of Movies The Selected Writings of Pauline Kael Edited by Sanford Schwartz Library of America, $40 Witty, entertaining and often exhilarating, this wide-ranging collection of pieces captures the film critic at her best. Alice James A Biography Jean Strouse, preface by Colm Tóibín New York Review Books, $17.95 paper The acclaimed biographer of financier J.P. Morgan chronicles the brief but brilliant life of the younger sister of William and Henry James.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend Susan Orlean Simon & Schuster: 288 pp., $26.99 They called him the Dog Wonder, the Mastermind Dog, America's Greatest Movie Dog. He was listed in the Los Angeles phone book, made more money than his human costars and actually came unnervingly close to winning the first Academy Award for actor. He was Rin Tin Tin and, as Susan Orlean puts it, "He was something you could dream about. He could leap twelve feet, and he could leap through time.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
With a dog at her feet and an advance copy of her book "Rin Tin Tin" on the table, Susan Orlean sips coffee in the backyard of the Los Angeles house she now calls home. In September, the New Yorker staff writer, whose book "The Orchid Thief" was the (sort of) basis for the film "Adaptation," left rural New York behind. For the next year, she, her husband and son will be calling themselves Angelenos, thanks partly to the movie-star dog and Orlean's responsibilities as a working mother. "I started being inflamed with the idea that Rin Tin Tin was a great story, but I didn't know what the story was, of course," says Orlean, who begins all her work with lively curiosity before plunging into the unknown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2007 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Pershing Square has been on a roller coaster of grandeur and decay since its dedication 141 years ago as public space. It has been refurbished and renamed at least half a dozen times. Once a lush green oasis, the park today is primarily concrete surrounded by skyscrapers. It boasts statues of Beethoven, a World War I doughboy and a Spanish American War soldier -- but only a plaque for the man whose name it bears. In the 1850s, settlers camped there on the outskirts of the village of Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1986 | Pat H. Broeske
Those flyboys keep getting the best of the King. Tom Cruise could get a star on the Walk of Fame. Not so the simian, much to the surprise of De Laurentiis Entertainment Group, planning promo for its Christmas film, "King Kong Lives." "It's disgusting--an outrage," said a DEG rep, who pointed out that the likes of Mickey Mouse, Bugs Bunny, Rin Tin Tin, Lassie and Strongheart have nabbed stars. "We think King Kong is as big a star as they are. Who remembers Strongheart, anyway?"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
We may be barking up the wrong tree, but it just might be that the Come 'N Get It Canine Film Festival--hosted by Martin Mull and scheduled for Oct. 25 in New York's Radio City Music Hall--is the first of its breed. Not a collection of Rin Tin Tin outtakes, the festival actually is the final leg of a national amateur canine talent contest looking for top dogs as captured on home movies or videos.
OPINION
April 24, 2005 | Joel Stein
Of all the things I will be held accountable for in hell, this will surprise me the least: Writing a part for an 11-year-old in my sitcom pilot. When Satan shows me the "E! True Hollywood Story" with the innocent child we helped turn into a 19-year-old in rehab, performing with a bad heavy metal band and divorced from a Playmate, I can only pray I'll have made a truckload of syndication money off him.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back during the Golden Age of Hollywood, moviegoers would see a program consisting of a newsreel, coming attractions, a cartoon, a serial and a feature. Universal's new and immensely entertaining "Universal Matinee" collection ($15 each) attempts to recapture those thrilling movie days of yesteryear. The legendary movie cowboy Buck Jones and his faithful horse Silver are the stars of the new "Matinee" series. Born in 1889, Jones was one of the most popular cowboy stars.
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