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Rinde Eckert

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January 23, 2000 | ANNE MIDGETTE, Anne Midgette is a New York-based arts writer
Onstage, a lone figure in a yellow slicker harangues in a gibbering frenzy. Now he declaims in stentorian operatic tones, now he croons tenderly; now he slides up to a high falsetto, now he rocks with the amplified backup of an offstage band. His moods swing like the boom of his drifting sailboat, caught in the wind. He is manic. He is irritating. You can't take your eyes off him. He comes to rest, finally, hanging from the mast, in a silhouette of crucifixion.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
Rinde Eckert -- singer, composer, writer, actor, director - is not the voice of reason. We need a name for the kind of character he creates. Call them Rindes. They're losers for sure. A little odd. Not bad guys at all but a little out of whack. They sing strange songs in a strange high tenor. The Rinde has emotions we might recognize but not want to acknowledge. He can't help himself, though, and his voice rings out with clarion discomfort -- beautiful, lovable and deeply disturbing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1994 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a Times staff writer.
Bay Area writer-performer Rinde Eckert is sitting on the lawn in the UCLA sculpture garden, talking about "The Gardening of Thomas D." "I had done a series of musical pieces that stayed in a confessional realm and I wanted to get away from that," says the artist of his performance piece based on Dante's "Divine Comedy." "As a writer, I thought it was time to look at some cultural icons." Classic texts aren't usually raw material for performance art.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
PALO ALTO - We hallucinate. But we are often of two minds about having two minds. We produce drugs to enhance hallucinations and drugs to dull them. Medical science seeks to relieve schizophrenics of their visions. Religion, on the other hand, sanctifies visionaries. Neurologists hunt for explanations. Art is haunted by the haunted. Where would opera be without its mad scenes and wild fantasies? Where would the Beatles have been without LSD? Stanford University made an ambitious attempt to bring together much of the above in its new Bing Concert Hall on Friday night with the premiere of "Visitations" - two short chamber operas about hallucinations by faculty composer and neurological researcher Jonathan Berger.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
How can one theatricalize such an abstract concept as the search for one's soul? Leonard Pitt manages the feat in his oddly humorous, poignant and compelling one-man show, "Not for Real," at Sushi Performance Gallery through Sunday. Don't be fooled when Pitt says: "Ideas, ideas are the things that count. Everything else is not for real." It's as deceptive as the moment he "eats" his face by slowly consuming the mask he is wearing without a touch of his fingers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Staff Writer
At their best, labels are deceptive; at worst, fraudulent. Up to now, several labels have been pinned on the rising reputation of composer Paul Dresher, the 34-year-old "performance artist" (whatever that means) who opened the ninth CalArts Contemporary Music Festival in Japan America Theatre on Thursday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
PALO ALTO - We hallucinate. But we are often of two minds about having two minds. We produce drugs to enhance hallucinations and drugs to dull them. Medical science seeks to relieve schizophrenics of their visions. Religion, on the other hand, sanctifies visionaries. Neurologists hunt for explanations. Art is haunted by the haunted. Where would opera be without its mad scenes and wild fantasies? Where would the Beatles have been without LSD? Stanford University made an ambitious attempt to bring together much of the above in its new Bing Concert Hall on Friday night with the premiere of "Visitations" - two short chamber operas about hallucinations by faculty composer and neurological researcher Jonathan Berger.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
Rinde Eckert -- singer, composer, writer, actor, director - is not the voice of reason. We need a name for the kind of character he creates. Call them Rindes. They're losers for sure. A little odd. Not bad guys at all but a little out of whack. They sing strange songs in a strange high tenor. The Rinde has emotions we might recognize but not want to acknowledge. He can't help himself, though, and his voice rings out with clarion discomfort -- beautiful, lovable and deeply disturbing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2009 | Diane Haithman
Competition officials weren't planning to announce the winners of the 2009 Albert Award in the Arts until May -- but overeager publicity reps for one lucky artist went e-mail crazy Thursday morning, so the news is out: An awards spokeswoman confirms that prizes of $75,000 each will go to Paul Chan of Brooklyn, N.Y., for film/video; interdisciplinary artist Rinde Eckert of Nyack, N.Y., for theater; composer-guitarist-violinist John King for music; Paul...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1988 | CHRIS PASLES
Paul Dresher may be the Gian Carlo Menotti of the electronic generation. That's not exactly a compliment. Dresher's so-called opera, "Slow Fire"--presented by the UCLA Center for the Performing Arts in the local premiere of its revised form, Saturday at the Wadsworth Theater--revealed a melodramatist with meager lyrical gifts addicted to push button emotionalism. Unlike Menotti, however, Dresher was not his own librettist.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2000 | ANNE MIDGETTE, Anne Midgette is a New York-based arts writer
Onstage, a lone figure in a yellow slicker harangues in a gibbering frenzy. Now he declaims in stentorian operatic tones, now he croons tenderly; now he slides up to a high falsetto, now he rocks with the amplified backup of an offstage band. His moods swing like the boom of his drifting sailboat, caught in the wind. He is manic. He is irritating. You can't take your eyes off him. He comes to rest, finally, hanging from the mast, in a silhouette of crucifixion.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1994 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a Times staff writer.
Bay Area writer-performer Rinde Eckert is sitting on the lawn in the UCLA sculpture garden, talking about "The Gardening of Thomas D." "I had done a series of musical pieces that stayed in a confessional realm and I wanted to get away from that," says the artist of his performance piece based on Dante's "Divine Comedy." "As a writer, I thought it was time to look at some cultural icons." Classic texts aren't usually raw material for performance art.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
How can one theatricalize such an abstract concept as the search for one's soul? Leonard Pitt manages the feat in his oddly humorous, poignant and compelling one-man show, "Not for Real," at Sushi Performance Gallery through Sunday. Don't be fooled when Pitt says: "Ideas, ideas are the things that count. Everything else is not for real." It's as deceptive as the moment he "eats" his face by slowly consuming the mask he is wearing without a touch of his fingers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Staff Writer
At their best, labels are deceptive; at worst, fraudulent. Up to now, several labels have been pinned on the rising reputation of composer Paul Dresher, the 34-year-old "performance artist" (whatever that means) who opened the ninth CalArts Contemporary Music Festival in Japan America Theatre on Thursday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1995 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The first joint venture between Highways and UCLA's Center for the Performing Arts, "The Idiot Variations," is soporific--but perhaps that is intentionally so. Bald and antic, with the face of a choirboy and the build of a dockworker, performance artist Rinde Eckert becomes so transported by his own artistry that he seems in a trance. In the midst of this meditative ecstasy, Eckert often forgets there's an audience out there, a fact of which director Robert Woodruff fails to remind him.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Remember hootenannies? Those gatherings, so popular in the '60s, in which folks sat around swapping songs? Think of the Stimmen World Music Festival, which made a stop at UCLA's Royce Hall on Sunday night, as a kind of world music hootenanny. The festival is actually the product of an annual German event that has brought together dozens of performers over the past eight years. For this tour, the collective included artists from India, Hungary, Switzerland, Mali, Madagascar and the United States.
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