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Rindge Dam

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1998
Your otherwise excellent piece on Rindge Dam and the southern steelhead omits a couple of key pieces of information. ("Removal May be Key to Steelhead Trout Survival," and "Government Plan Ill-Conceived, Costly," both March 29). Although Ron Rindge clearly has a strong sentimental attachment to Rindge Dam, his family no longer owns it. Malibu Canyon, including the dam, was purchased by the state of California in 1983 and is now part of Malibu Creek State Park. There is evidence that steelhead once migrated into the upper Malibu Creek watershed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2010 | By Carla Hall
One of the most extensive searches in the history of the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department turned up no evidence of Mitrice Richardson, the young woman who has been missing since leaving the Malibu sheriff's station Sept. 17. The fourth fruitless search of the Malibu area left police and sheriff's investigators mystified and family members clinging to hope that she is still alive. "The beautiful thing about today is that they didn't find a cadaver," said Michael Richardson, 42, the father of the missing woman.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1999
Re "Extinction of Special Fish May Hit a Snag," Nov. 30. Steve Hymon's story awakened many dormant and poignant memories of my childhood summers in Upper Malibu Creek. Although we lived in southwest Los Angeles, my family and that of my Uncle John spent entire summers from 1944 through 1950 camping at Crater Camp, just across Piuma Road from the confluence of Las Virgenes, Malibu and Cold creeks. When the campground sold in the early '50s and became a raw land subdivision, my dad and uncle bought a lot and built some of the first homes in a place called Malibu Meadows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1999
Re "Extinction of Special Fish May Hit a Snag," Nov. 30. Steve Hymon's story awakened many dormant and poignant memories of my childhood summers in Upper Malibu Creek. Although we lived in southwest Los Angeles, my family and that of my Uncle John spent entire summers from 1944 through 1950 camping at Crater Camp, just across Piuma Road from the confluence of Las Virgenes, Malibu and Cold creeks. When the campground sold in the early '50s and became a raw land subdivision, my dad and uncle bought a lot and built some of the first homes in a place called Malibu Meadows.
SPORTS
June 14, 1989 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
"Swim!" said the mama fishy, "Swim if you can!" and they swam and they swam, back over the dam. --Lyrics from "Three Little Fishes" by Saxie Dowell, 1939 Jimmy Decker swears that even after the Rindge Dam was wedged into Malibu Canyon in 1926 to create a water supply for the beach colony, the steelhead continued to migrate upstream to spawn. "Those years, we'd get up to 50 inches of rain in one season," Decker, 71, recalls. "The water used to pour over the dam six to 10 feet deep."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1998 | RONALD L. RINDGE, Ronald L. Rindge of Moorpark is the grandson of pioneer Mailbu rancher May Knight Rindge, for whom the dam is named
Reporter Steve Hymon's March 1 interview with Jim Edmondson regarding the Rindge Dam and steelhead trout in Malibu Creek prompts this rebuttal: * There is no record or proof that steelhead ever migrated much farther than the site of the dam, which is to be expected as two or more waterfalls blocked such progress. * Steelhead thrived in Malibu Creek below the dam for more than 35 years after it was built in 1924.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1998
Re "Genetics May Save Trout from Extinction," Nov. 30. Statements in this article prompt the following comments: The genetic diversity discussion of Southern California steelhead trout is largely conjecture, as readers will note from the liberal use of words such as "may," "perhaps," "probably" and "could mean." As to the silt-choked Rindge Dam blocking steelhead migration upstream, this is true for only a few hundred yards as natural waterfalls blocked migration to the upper Malibu Creek watershed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1998 | RONALD L. RINDGE, Ronald L. Rindge of Moorpark is the grandson of pioneer Mailbu rancher May Knight Rindge, for whom the dam is named
There is no record or proof that steelhead ever migrated much farther than the site of the dam, which is to be expected as two or more waterfalls blocked such progress. Steelhead thrived in Malibu Creek below the dam for more than 35 years after it was built in 1924. Steelhead declined in Malibu Creek starting in the 1960s due to effluent flows from the Tapia sewage treatment plant and tainted water runoff from the urbanizing upper watershed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1996
Re "Stream of Dreams," July 31. The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board supports the maintenance and restoration of steelhead trout--now proposed for listing as endangered--in Southern California's still viable steelhead streams. Steelhead are like the canary in the coal mine, and their status is representative of the health of western coastal streams. The principal streams in Los Angeles and Ventura counties having suitable habitat and remnant steelhead runs are the Santa Clara River and its tributaries, Ventura River and its tributaries, and Malibu Creek.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1997
Two articles in the Aug. 12 edition of The Times report that steelhead trout have been listed as endangered in Southern California, including the Santa Clara and Ventura rivers. Taxpayers should follow this matter closely to see if their governmental agencies squander millions of dollars in ill-conceived "save-the-trout" projects or if they inject stringent cost-benefit principles into their studies. Two projects mentioned in these articles bear close scrutiny by taxpayers. The installation of a fish ladder at Robles Dam in the Ojai Valley is estimated to cost between $2 million and $5 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1998
Re "Genetics May Save Trout from Extinction," Nov. 30. Statements in this article prompt the following comments: The genetic diversity discussion of Southern California steelhead trout is largely conjecture, as readers will note from the liberal use of words such as "may," "perhaps," "probably" and "could mean." As to the silt-choked Rindge Dam blocking steelhead migration upstream, this is true for only a few hundred yards as natural waterfalls blocked migration to the upper Malibu Creek watershed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1998
Your otherwise excellent piece on Rindge Dam and the southern steelhead omits a couple of key pieces of information. ("Removal May be Key to Steelhead Trout Survival," and "Government Plan Ill-Conceived, Costly," both March 29). Although Ron Rindge clearly has a strong sentimental attachment to Rindge Dam, his family no longer owns it. Malibu Canyon, including the dam, was purchased by the state of California in 1983 and is now part of Malibu Creek State Park. There is evidence that steelhead once migrated into the upper Malibu Creek watershed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1998 | RONALD L. RINDGE, Ronald L. Rindge of Moorpark is the grandson of pioneer Mailbu rancher May Knight Rindge, for whom the dam is named
There is no record or proof that steelhead ever migrated much farther than the site of the dam, which is to be expected as two or more waterfalls blocked such progress. Steelhead thrived in Malibu Creek below the dam for more than 35 years after it was built in 1924. Steelhead declined in Malibu Creek starting in the 1960s due to effluent flows from the Tapia sewage treatment plant and tainted water runoff from the urbanizing upper watershed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1998 | RONALD L. RINDGE, Ronald L. Rindge of Moorpark is the grandson of pioneer Mailbu rancher May Knight Rindge, for whom the dam is named
Reporter Steve Hymon's March 1 interview with Jim Edmondson regarding the Rindge Dam and steelhead trout in Malibu Creek prompts this rebuttal: * There is no record or proof that steelhead ever migrated much farther than the site of the dam, which is to be expected as two or more waterfalls blocked such progress. * Steelhead thrived in Malibu Creek below the dam for more than 35 years after it was built in 1924.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1998 | STEVE HYMON, Steve Hymon is a Times staff writer
In the 10,000-year history of the southern steelhead trout, Aug. 11, 1997, was particularly noteworthy. On this day, the fish was listed as an endangered species by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). The steelhead is closely related to the Pacific salmon; like the salmon, the steelhead is anadromous--meaning it migrates to sea and then returns to its native coastal streams and rivers to spawn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1997
Two articles in the Aug. 12 edition of The Times report that steelhead trout have been listed as endangered in Southern California, including the Santa Clara and Ventura rivers. Taxpayers should follow this matter closely to see if their governmental agencies squander millions of dollars in ill-conceived "save-the-trout" projects or if they inject stringent cost-benefit principles into their studies. Two projects mentioned in these articles bear close scrutiny by taxpayers. The installation of a fish ladder at Robles Dam in the Ojai Valley is estimated to cost between $2 million and $5 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1986 | JUDY PASTERNAK, Times Staff Writer
After a four-month survey and examinations in Malibu and San Diego laboratories, state biologists have concluded that a small number of steelhead trout--a prized giant fish that was thought to have died out in Southern California--have returned to Malibu Creek. The creek is believed to be the steelhead's southernmost home in the United States. As a protective measure, organizers of the survey recommended last week that all fishing be prohibited in a 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2010 | By Carla Hall
One of the most extensive searches in the history of the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department turned up no evidence of Mitrice Richardson, the young woman who has been missing since leaving the Malibu sheriff's station Sept. 17. The fourth fruitless search of the Malibu area left police and sheriff's investigators mystified and family members clinging to hope that she is still alive. "The beautiful thing about today is that they didn't find a cadaver," said Michael Richardson, 42, the father of the missing woman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1996
Re "Stream of Dreams," July 31. The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board supports the maintenance and restoration of steelhead trout--now proposed for listing as endangered--in Southern California's still viable steelhead streams. Steelhead are like the canary in the coal mine, and their status is representative of the health of western coastal streams. The principal streams in Los Angeles and Ventura counties having suitable habitat and remnant steelhead runs are the Santa Clara River and its tributaries, Ventura River and its tributaries, and Malibu Creek.
SPORTS
June 14, 1989 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
"Swim!" said the mama fishy, "Swim if you can!" and they swam and they swam, back over the dam. --Lyrics from "Three Little Fishes" by Saxie Dowell, 1939 Jimmy Decker swears that even after the Rindge Dam was wedged into Malibu Canyon in 1926 to create a water supply for the beach colony, the steelhead continued to migrate upstream to spawn. "Those years, we'd get up to 50 inches of rain in one season," Decker, 71, recalls. "The water used to pour over the dam six to 10 feet deep."
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