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April 15, 2010 | By Simone Kussatz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Los Angeles Opera announced a citywide Ring Festival LA to celebrate the four- opera cycle of Wagner's "Der Ring des Nibelungen," it was only natural that Villa Aurora, a center of German American culture in Pacific Palisades, would want to get involved. So the people at the Villa, once the residence of exiled German-Jewish writer Lion Feuchtwanger, invited Viennese composer Georg Nussbaumer to create something for Los Angeles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2010 | By Richard S. Ginell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you had dropped in at a rehearsal in Room 105 at the USC Thornton School of Music earlier this month, you would have caught a lively scene. Two singers were holding chairs upside-down over their heads — not the usual position, obviously. A young woman was diligently slapping another fellow around. Others practiced headlocks, repeated kisses, crawling on the hard floor. Later there were several run-throughs of a crowd scene in which a gaggle of kids in the chorus swaggered and cavorted around the room, singing and having a fine, rowdy time as the rehearsal pianist rattled off some catchy, comic- opera pitter-patter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2009 | Diane Haithman
It looks as if 2010 is shaping up as Southern California's Year of Opera Festivals. In November, Los Angeles arts officials announced Ring Festival L.A., a 10-week, citywide event to be held April 15 through June 30, 2010. It will have as its centerpiece Los Angeles Opera's production of Richard Wagner's epic four-cycle "Der Ring des Nibelungen," the city's first presentation of the cycle. And on Saturday in Dana Point, a different set of officials farther south plans to announce a new Italian Opera Festival, scheduled for Aug. 22 to Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2010 | By Simone Kussatz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Los Angeles Opera announced a citywide Ring Festival LA to celebrate the four- opera cycle of Wagner's "Der Ring des Nibelungen," it was only natural that Villa Aurora, a center of German American culture in Pacific Palisades, would want to get involved. So the people at the Villa, once the residence of exiled German-Jewish writer Lion Feuchtwanger, invited Viennese composer Georg Nussbaumer to create something for Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2008 | Diane Haithman
The Los Angeles City Council voted to cut by half the amount the city is spending to provide city services for many special events presented by nonprofit organizations, such as arts and community festivals. In recent years, the city has made a practice of providing numerous groups with a fee waiver to cover 100% of the cost of police, traffic cops, firefighters, street custodians and street inspectors required for their events. But Lynne Ozawa, assistant chief legislative analyst for Los Angeles, says those annual costs were getting out of control.
OPINION
July 18, 2009 | TIM RUTTEN
Next spring, the Los Angeles Opera will stage its first complete production of Richard Wagner's monumental four-opera cycle, "Der Ring des Nibelungen." In conjunction with those performances, more than 70 arts, cultural and educational institutions will produce a 10-week "Ring Festival," consisting of concerts, exhibitions, symposiums, lectures and other performances. It will be L.A.'
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2009 | Diane Haithman
Asking German stage director Achim Freyer whether he worries about criticism of his avant-garde style is like asking Julia Child whether she ever worried about using too much butter. The director of Los Angeles Opera's production of Wagner's "Ring" cycle acknowledged before the premiere of "Das Rhinegold" in February that controversy seems to follow him, as it did when his 2002 staging of Bach's B-Minor Mass for L.A. Opera drew boos and a spate of angry letters to The Times; where there's smoke, there's Freyer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2009 | David Ng
After a spirited debate that pitted two prominent Los Angeles politicians against each other over issues of anti-Semitism and the operas of Richard Wagner, the County Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to give its support to the 2010 Ring Festival L.A., a citywide arts celebration that will focus on Wagner's epic cycle, "The Ring of the Nibelung." The board rejected a motion by Supervisor Mike Antonovich asking the festival's main backer, the Los Angeles Opera, to shift the event's focus away from Wagner, the renowned 19th century composer who is widely admired for his operas and detested for his virulently anti-Semitic personal views.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2010 | By Richard S. Ginell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you had dropped in at a rehearsal in Room 105 at the USC Thornton School of Music earlier this month, you would have caught a lively scene. Two singers were holding chairs upside-down over their heads — not the usual position, obviously. A young woman was diligently slapping another fellow around. Others practiced headlocks, repeated kisses, crawling on the hard floor. Later there were several run-throughs of a crowd scene in which a gaggle of kids in the chorus swaggered and cavorted around the room, singing and having a fine, rowdy time as the rehearsal pianist rattled off some catchy, comic- opera pitter-patter.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2010 | By Reed Johnson
Among the copious anecdotes that Leon Botstein likes to relate about Richard Wagner and his ugly anti-Jewish views is an ironic one involving Zionist Movement founder Theodor Herzl. As Botstein has detailed in an essay, in 1895 Herzl was a journalist in Paris covering the Dreyfus affair, an army scandal with anti-Semitic taints that rocked French society. When he wasn't filing news reports, Herzl attended the Paris Opera, where he absorbed Wagner's volcanic music. He was inspired both by the German composer's artistry and his ideas about community-building, which some scholars believe helped shape Herzl's concept of a Jewish homeland.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2010 | By Reed Johnson
Among the copious anecdotes that Leon Botstein likes to relate about Richard Wagner and his ugly anti-Jewish views is an ironic one involving Zionist Movement founder Theodor Herzl. As Botstein has detailed in an essay, in 1895 Herzl was a journalist in Paris covering the Dreyfus affair, an army scandal with anti-Semitic taints that rocked French society. When he wasn't filing news reports, Herzl attended the Paris Opera, where he absorbed Wagner's volcanic music. He was inspired both by the German composer's artistry and his ideas about community-building, which some scholars believe helped shape Herzl's concept of a Jewish homeland.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2009 | Diane Haithman
Asking German stage director Achim Freyer whether he worries about criticism of his avant-garde style is like asking Julia Child whether she ever worried about using too much butter. The director of Los Angeles Opera's production of Wagner's "Ring" cycle acknowledged before the premiere of "Das Rhinegold" in February that controversy seems to follow him, as it did when his 2002 staging of Bach's B-Minor Mass for L.A. Opera drew boos and a spate of angry letters to The Times; where there's smoke, there's Freyer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2009 | David Ng
After a spirited debate that pitted two prominent Los Angeles politicians against each other over issues of anti-Semitism and the operas of Richard Wagner, the County Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to give its support to the 2010 Ring Festival L.A., a citywide arts celebration that will focus on Wagner's epic cycle, "The Ring of the Nibelung." The board rejected a motion by Supervisor Mike Antonovich asking the festival's main backer, the Los Angeles Opera, to shift the event's focus away from Wagner, the renowned 19th century composer who is widely admired for his operas and detested for his virulently anti-Semitic personal views.
OPINION
July 18, 2009 | TIM RUTTEN
Next spring, the Los Angeles Opera will stage its first complete production of Richard Wagner's monumental four-opera cycle, "Der Ring des Nibelungen." In conjunction with those performances, more than 70 arts, cultural and educational institutions will produce a 10-week "Ring Festival," consisting of concerts, exhibitions, symposiums, lectures and other performances. It will be L.A.'
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2009 | Diane Haithman
It looks as if 2010 is shaping up as Southern California's Year of Opera Festivals. In November, Los Angeles arts officials announced Ring Festival L.A., a 10-week, citywide event to be held April 15 through June 30, 2010. It will have as its centerpiece Los Angeles Opera's production of Richard Wagner's epic four-cycle "Der Ring des Nibelungen," the city's first presentation of the cycle. And on Saturday in Dana Point, a different set of officials farther south plans to announce a new Italian Opera Festival, scheduled for Aug. 22 to Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2008 | Diane Haithman
The Los Angeles City Council voted to cut by half the amount the city is spending to provide city services for many special events presented by nonprofit organizations, such as arts and community festivals. In recent years, the city has made a practice of providing numerous groups with a fee waiver to cover 100% of the cost of police, traffic cops, firefighters, street custodians and street inspectors required for their events. But Lynne Ozawa, assistant chief legislative analyst for Los Angeles, says those annual costs were getting out of control.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2010 | By Reed Johnson
Among the eclectic offerings on tap for Los Angeles Opera's Ring Festival LA will be a Teutonic beer garden, lectures on Richard Wagner's masterful artistry and racist ideology, a screening of the Bugs Bunny classic "What's Opera, Doc?" and a convergence of Norse mythology and astrophysics at the Griffith Observatory dubbed "Light of the Valkyries." Among the festival ideas that didn't make the final cut: a "dancing blimp" over downtown L.A. and an all-German dog show at the Convention Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
With Los Angeles in the grips of Ring Festival LA fever launched by the L.A. Opera's presentation of Richard Wagner's "Der Ring des Nibelungen," the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Goethe Institut are presenting Fritz Lang's two-part 1924 silent masterpiece, "Die Nibelungen," Friday and Saturday at LACMA's Bing Theater. Paul Richter, Gertrud Arnold and Rudolf Klein-Rogge star in one of the seminal films from the German silent era. The film features a newly recorded version of the original score by Gottfried Huppertz and conducted by Berndt Heller.
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