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March 21, 2010 | By Mike Boehm >>>
In Richard Wagner's "The Ring of the Nibelung," a pile of sacred gold and a ring that's fashioned from it are said to confer "measureless might." However, by the fourth scene of the 17-hour-plus opus, a drawback has emerged: A curse gets attached to the loot, and a colorful assortment of gods, dwarfs, giants and humans spend the rest of the proceedings either succumbing to the hex or trying to set things right. Achim Freyer can relate. Los Angeles Opera has put him in charge of its own mighty hoard -- the $32 million budgeted for mounting L.A.'s first-ever production of the Ring, a four-part work that connoisseurs consider opera's Mount Everest.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2010 | By Scarlet Cheng
Two art museums are contributing to Los Angeles' Ring Festival with small exhibitions opening this month. At the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, "Myths, Legends, and Cultural Renewal: Wagner's Sources" (April 15-Aug. 16) looks at some of the artists who drew inspiration from the same sources as "Ring" composer Richard Wagner. At the Fullerton Art Museum at Cal State San Bernardino, "Timeless Enchantment: Richard Wagner's 'Ring of the Nibelung' in Visual Arts and Performance" (Thursday-July 31)
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
The Metropolitan Opera's new production of the four operas in Richard Wagner's "Der Ring des Nibelungen" will be televised on four consecutive evenings in June, 1990, by Public Broadcasting Service. "Das Rheingold" will be broadcast June 18, followed by "Die Walkure," "Siegfried" and "Gotterdammerung," the Met announced Thursday. The composer wanted the operas to be seen in four straight nights so that impact could build over the 17 hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By Mike Boehm >>>
In Richard Wagner's "The Ring of the Nibelung," a pile of sacred gold and a ring that's fashioned from it are said to confer "measureless might." However, by the fourth scene of the 17-hour-plus opus, a drawback has emerged: A curse gets attached to the loot, and a colorful assortment of gods, dwarfs, giants and humans spend the rest of the proceedings either succumbing to the hex or trying to set things right. Achim Freyer can relate. Los Angeles Opera has put him in charge of its own mighty hoard -- the $32 million budgeted for mounting L.A.'s first-ever production of the Ring, a four-part work that connoisseurs consider opera's Mount Everest.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2010 | By Scarlet Cheng
Two art museums are contributing to Los Angeles' Ring Festival with small exhibitions opening this month. At the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, "Myths, Legends, and Cultural Renewal: Wagner's Sources" (April 15-Aug. 16) looks at some of the artists who drew inspiration from the same sources as "Ring" composer Richard Wagner. At the Fullerton Art Museum at Cal State San Bernardino, "Timeless Enchantment: Richard Wagner's 'Ring of the Nibelung' in Visual Arts and Performance" (Thursday-July 31)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2006 | By Christopher Reynolds
Here's the thing about Wagnerians and their favorite composer's beloved "Ring" cycle: If you stage the operas, pretty much anywhere, they will come, from pretty much anywhere else. Hence the presence in Costa Mesa this week of Leona Geeves of Sydney, Australia; Ray Gildea of Madison, Miss.; June Slobodian of Winnipeg, Canada -- she's the one in the plastic Viking helmet -- and scores of other impassioned strangers with deep knowledge of Norse myth, Romantic orchestration and German pronunciation.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By Chris Barton
Opera fans who haven't yet had the opportunity to weigh in on the Metropolitan Opera's new -- and divisive -- production of Wagner's "Ring" cycle, take note: PBS will air the four operas on consecutive evenings beginning  Sept. 11. A multimillion-dollar effort directed by Robert Lepage, the Met's "Ring" cycle become something of a punching bag for some of New York City's critics, with much of the harsh words reserved for the production's ambitious staging, which included a 45-ton set of revolving planks.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2010 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
With its climactic stagings of Richard Wagner's epic "Ring" cycle about to begin Saturday night, Los Angeles Opera leaders concede that ticket income will fall $1 million to $1.5 million short of targets set during what now seems like a different epoch: the days before the Great Recession. Stephen Rountree, L.A. Opera's chief operating officer, holds out hope that the company can use ramped-up fundraising to fill the resulting budget hole for the four-part, 17-hour-plus opus. He said fundraising will continue for several months after the "Ring" is done, and is expected to yield $18 million to $20 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
Wednesday marked Richard Wagner's 200th birthday, and Bayreuth's big dude is bigger than ever, which is saying something. Record companies have been releasing and re-releasing Wagner recordings this year to an endlessly excessive extent. But the one that thus far stands out most, which is also really saying something, is a performance of Wagner's most popular “Ring” cycle opera, “Die Walküre,” from the Mariinsky Orchestra in St. Petersburg and conducted by Valery Gergiev.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2009 | Mark Swed, Music Critic
When indefatigable Los Angeles Opera music director James Conlon began his engrossing pre-performance talk before "Siegfried" on Saturday, a blazing midday sun was directly overhead at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. By the time he finished conducting the long opera, day was done. The sky had reddened but not brilliantly enough to compete with the glow lingering from director Achim Freyer's carnival of light inside or from Wagner's music. Los Angeles Opera's ring around the "Ring" has come to the third opera of the tetralogy and the one most challenging to make convincing onstage.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2006 | By Christopher Reynolds
Here's the thing about Wagnerians and their favorite composer's beloved "Ring" cycle: If you stage the operas, pretty much anywhere, they will come, from pretty much anywhere else. Hence the presence in Costa Mesa this week of Leona Geeves of Sydney, Australia; Ray Gildea of Madison, Miss.; June Slobodian of Winnipeg, Canada -- she's the one in the plastic Viking helmet -- and scores of other impassioned strangers with deep knowledge of Norse myth, Romantic orchestration and German pronunciation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
The Metropolitan Opera's new production of the four operas in Richard Wagner's "Der Ring des Nibelungen" will be televised on four consecutive evenings in June, 1990, by Public Broadcasting Service. "Das Rheingold" will be broadcast June 18, followed by "Die Walkure," "Siegfried" and "Gotterdammerung," the Met announced Thursday. The composer wanted the operas to be seen in four straight nights so that impact could build over the 17 hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
This was the week that the Los Angeles Philharmonic dared to mess with its moneymaking formula of programming warhorse concertos for nearly every classical concert at the Hollywood Bowl. Tuesday night, Philip Glass' 21-year-old Violin Concerto (a newborn by Bowl standards) came off splendidly. Thursday night, an even younger percussion concerto by Christopher Rouse did as well. Tuesday's program was conducted by the first Philharmonic principal guest conductor at the Bowl, Leonard Slatkin.
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