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Ringling Brothers And Barnum Bailey Circus

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NEWS
January 15, 1994 | From Reuters
Investigators focused on a possible broken wheel in the probe of a Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey circus train derailment that killed two performers, federal officials said Friday. "A wheel was possibly involved in the accident. We are attempting to locate as many parts of the wheel as possible," said Jim Hall, a spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board. Once collected, the pieces of the metal wheel will be sent to the safety board laboratory in Washington, D.C.
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NATIONAL
May 6, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus is threatening to bypass P.T. Barnum's home state if its Legislature passes a bill prohibiting the use of an elephant-herding tool known as a bullhook. Animal rights activists say the hooks can injure elephants. If the bill is passed and signed into law, Connecticut will be the first state to prohibit the steel tool, circus officials said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1991 | AMY KUEBELBECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He wears bulbous shoes with a nose to match, frumps around in a bad suit, has makeup lines you have to see to believe--and gets love letters from smitten circus-goers. David Larible, from a seven-generation circus family in Italy and now the first clown to headline the venerable Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, raises his painted eyebrows and shakes his head. "They don't go in love with you. They go in love with David the Clown," he says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2001 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a defeat for animal rights activists, a San Jose jury Friday acquitted a star Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus trainer of charges that he abused an elephant off stage during a show last summer. Mark Oliver Gebel, 31, could have faced six months in jail if convicted of mistreating Asia, a 4-ton performing elephant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1993 | TERRY SPENCER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Riding atop a circus elephant eight feet above the bone-breaking asphalt of Lewis Street, Monica Spoelstra was having difficulty Monday following a handler's admonition to "just relax." Hunched over and grabbing the elephant's ears with a vise-like grip, Spoelstra, 26, muttered, "I really don't believe this," as the animal lumbered in the one-mile parade that signaled the arrival of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1994 | MARTIN MILLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When a herd of elephants tromps single-file into the the parking lot of The Pond of Anaheim, it means one of two things: Either the Republican National Convention or the circus is in town. The hundreds of parents and children who lined a mile-long stretch of streets weren't applauding any glad-handers Wednesday afternoon; instead they were cheering the circus elephants and horses.
NEWS
January 14, 1994 | From Associated Press
A train carrying circus performers and animals derailed Thursday at a crossing, killing two people and injuring 14 others, authorities said. Sixteen cars jumped the tracks shortly after 9 a.m. as the 53-car train traveled across Florida from St. Petersburg to Orlando, where the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus was to open tonight. "The show always goes on. I suspect we will be late, but the show always goes on," said David Cohen, the circus manager and a passenger on the train.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1990 | LISA MASCARO
Imagine sitting surrounded by the "oohs" and "aahs" of what they call the Greatest Show on Earth but being unable to see a sleek acrobat's breathtaking plunge, an elephant's enormous stance or a hilarious clown's neon plaid and striped get-up. Most visually impaired visitors to the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus can only imagine what it looks like from afar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1989 | ALLISON SAMUELS
Despite temperatures in the 90s, hundreds of people gathered Monday afternoon to catch a glimpse of elephants, lions and tigers marching on the Anaheim Convention Center. The unlikely parade down Lewis Street and Katella Avenue marked the arrival Monday of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus, which will perform at the convention center today through next Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1992 | DAVID A. AVILA
The crowd roared as 18 elephants marched down busy Katella Avenue Monday, leading a caravan of 12 horses and four camels, all en route to the circus. Hundreds of children and their parents lined the streets of Anaheim as the beasts from Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus disembarked from the train near Anaheim Stadium and began the trek. Children literally climbed out of the trees as the parade finally arrived at the Anaheim Convention Center three miles and two hours later.
NEWS
December 18, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Asia, the circus elephant, has wowed audiences around the nation with her leg lifts, ring prancing and ear-flapping headstands. But is she a willing performer, or a victim of animal abuse at the hands of one of the circus world's leading trainers? That question will be put to Santa Clara County jurors this week in a criminal trial that activists hope will blow the big top off the Greatest Show on Earth and its animal treatment practices. Animal-rights advocates have long accused Ringling Bros.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1999
A group of 25 children studying for an "associate degree" in clownology learned the finer points of juggling, makeup and human pyramids Tuesday from professionals of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum and Bailey circus. The Los Angeles Children's Museum hosted the first in a series of four seminars for the group of inner-city youths, ages 11 to 13. They belong to the Los Angeles Police Department's Deputy Auxiliary Police Youth Program, which provides activities for young people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1998 | DEBRA CANO
They didn't glide down a red carpet, but the stars of the "Greatest Show on Earth" received a Hollywood-style welcome Monday in Anaheim. Asian elephants, nine Russian horses, half a dozen miniatures horses, five white alpacas, a pair of miniature donkeys, two Scottish Highland cows and a goat named Uma mesmerized a crowd as they stepped off the circus train. Karen, a 28-year-old elephant, led a parade of animals from the train to the Pond of Anaheim, where the 128th edition of Ringling Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1996 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Vargas kids didn't have to run away to join the circus--they were born there. Mother rode horses and was an acrobat; father was a flier, an animal trainer, a clown and teeterboard artist. Their family troupe traveled a circuit of towns small and large in Mexico, so it's little surprise that their 10 children learned a few tricks of their own. They became, in the process, the fourth generation of circus Vargases.
NEWS
August 14, 1994 | MARTIN MILLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even among co-workers who kiss lions, ride horseback upside down and somersault on the high wire, Jon Weiss is something of a spectacle. Five hundred times a year, the 32-year-old Long Island native shimmies down the barrel of a huge cannon and waits for an audience countdown to catapult him across the Big Top to circus glory. Three, two, one, BOOM! Weiss flies out of the cannon's mouth at speeds up to 65 m.p.h.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1994 | MARTIN MILLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even among co-workers who kiss lions, ride horseback upside down and somersault on the high wire, Jon Weiss is something of a spectacle. Five hundred times a year, the 32-year-old Long Island native shimmies down the barrel of a huge cannon and waits for an audience countdown to catapult him across the Big Top to circus glory. Three, two, one, BOOM! Weiss flies out of the cannon's mouth at speeds up to 65 m.p.h.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1991 | JON NALICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Neal Huff, 29, trotted alongside a parade of pachyderms Monday to give his twin 7-month-old sons a brief preview of the "greatest show on Earth." Linked by trunk and tail, more than a dozen elephants lumbered single-file through the city, followed by a host of horses, camels, llamas, Shetland ponies and zebras, all on their way to the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus. And hundreds of children and adults lined the streets to see the show.
NEWS
August 14, 1994 | MARTIN MILLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even among co-workers who kiss lions, ride horseback upside down and somersault on the high wire, Jon Weiss is something of a spectacle. Five hundred times a year, the 32-year-old Long Island native shimmies down the barrel of a huge cannon and waits for an audience countdown to catapult him across the Big Top to circus glory. Three, two, one, BOOM! Weiss flies out of the cannon's mouth at speeds up to 65 m.p.h.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1994 | MARTIN MILLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When a herd of elephants tromps single-file into the the parking lot of The Pond of Anaheim, it means one of two things: Either the Republican National Convention or the circus is in town. The hundreds of parents and children who lined a mile-long stretch of streets weren't applauding any glad-handers Wednesday afternoon; instead they were cheering the circus elephants and horses.
NEWS
January 15, 1994 | From Reuters
Investigators focused on a possible broken wheel in the probe of a Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey circus train derailment that killed two performers, federal officials said Friday. "A wheel was possibly involved in the accident. We are attempting to locate as many parts of the wheel as possible," said Jim Hall, a spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board. Once collected, the pieces of the metal wheel will be sent to the safety board laboratory in Washington, D.C.
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