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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2007 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
JOHN WAYNE would be turning 100 on Saturday, and to mark the occasion, studios with Wayne titles in their vaults are in the throes of reissue madness. Paramount is releasing a 14-film "centennial collection" and a deluxe edition of "True Grit" (1969), which won the Duke his only Oscar. Lionsgate digs into Wayne's 1940s and '50s work with genre house Republic Pictures and emerges with two themed box sets (war flicks and westerns) and six double-feature discs. Warner Bros.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
Something like the border between the United States and Mexico doesn't ordinarily come to mind when considering abstract paintings. Yet for the last two years, Tony de los Reyes has been developing a quirky group of abstractions with exactly that distinctive -- and distinctly political -- edge. Color and line articulating space on canvas bumps up against their contentious counterpart in the North American landscape. Eight large, lush abstractions at Angles Gallery are joined with five smaller studies, plus a suite of eight lithographs.
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SPORTS
March 27, 1993
Regarding the Jim Murray column of March 14, in which he writes: "What would golf have done if (Arnold Palmer) had retired at the age (Bjorn Borg) did? It'd be like John Wayne getting shot in the second reel of 'Rio Hondo.' " Wayne made a film called "Hondo" and two called "Rio Lobo" and "Rio Bravo," but no "Rio Hondo." KENNETH G. SMITH Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Susan King
Howard Hawks never met a movie genre he couldn't adapt to splendidly. In a career that spanned the silent era to 1970, Hawks directed gangster melodrama (1932's "Scarface") screwball comedies (1938's "Bringing Up Baby"), westerns (1948's "Red River"), film noirs (1946's "The Big Sleep"), musicals (1953's "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes") and adventures (1939's "Only Angels Have Wings"). This weekend, two of his best comedies, 1940's "His Girl Friday" with Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell and 1941's "Ball of Fire" with Gary Cooper and an Oscar-nominated Barbara Stanwyck, screen at the American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Restaurant operator Chevy's Inc. agreed to acquire a chain of 66 Mexican-style restaurants from Applebee International Inc. for $53 million in cash, expanding its reach into the Southeast and Midwest markets. San Francisco-based Chevy's, which operates restaurants primarily in the Western U.S., said it will spend about $6 million to bring the Rio Bravo Cantina franchisees into its network of almost 100 Fresh Mex restaurants.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
Something like the border between the United States and Mexico doesn't ordinarily come to mind when considering abstract paintings. Yet for the last two years, Tony de los Reyes has been developing a quirky group of abstractions with exactly that distinctive -- and distinctly political -- edge. Color and line articulating space on canvas bumps up against their contentious counterpart in the North American landscape. Eight large, lush abstractions at Angles Gallery are joined with five smaller studies, plus a suite of eight lithographs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1989
As a graduate student of Chicano history, I felt compelled to write in response to Ray Chavira's comment regarding Cinco de Mayo ("Trouble at Cinco de Mayo Events Could Doom Future Festivals," by Michael J. Ybarra and George Ramos, Metro, May 9). Though I agree with his belief that the holiday has been commercialized and thus is a money-making opportunity for many businesses, I do not think he understands the true significance of the date. The following is an answer to Chavira's question: "What about the real reason for celebrating it?"
HOME & GARDEN
September 7, 2013 | Chris Erskine
Strange afternoon, strangely wonderful. For all the things about L.A. that I mock, tease about, sigh deeply over, there are always moments like these, usually in modest surroundings with everyday Joes, that make me wonder if I've finally been reeled in by a city that frequently over-promises. I have long debates with friends over our region's high cost of living, the postage-stamp yards, the monotony of the too-glorious weather. At a dinner party, one buddy insisted that headhunters no longer recruit here because those they hire for out-of-state jobs invariably return to California within a few years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Susan King
Howard Hawks never met a movie genre he couldn't adapt to splendidly. In a career that spanned the silent era to 1970, Hawks directed gangster melodrama (1932's "Scarface") screwball comedies (1938's "Bringing Up Baby"), westerns (1948's "Red River"), film noirs (1946's "The Big Sleep"), musicals (1953's "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes") and adventures (1939's "Only Angels Have Wings"). This weekend, two of his best comedies, 1940's "His Girl Friday" with Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell and 1941's "Ball of Fire" with Gary Cooper and an Oscar-nominated Barbara Stanwyck, screen at the American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre.
HOME & GARDEN
September 7, 2013 | Chris Erskine
Strange afternoon, strangely wonderful. For all the things about L.A. that I mock, tease about, sigh deeply over, there are always moments like these, usually in modest surroundings with everyday Joes, that make me wonder if I've finally been reeled in by a city that frequently over-promises. I have long debates with friends over our region's high cost of living, the postage-stamp yards, the monotony of the too-glorious weather. At a dinner party, one buddy insisted that headhunters no longer recruit here because those they hire for out-of-state jobs invariably return to California within a few years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2009 | Susan King
Howard Hawks, the director of such classics as "Bringing Up Baby," "His Girl Friday" and "Red River," never was one to point his finger if one of his films failed. He always took the blame. "He didn't alibi it," says the late filmmaker's friend, director Peter Bogdanovich, who wrote about Hawks in his book "Who the Devil Made It." "He said it was his fault. He didn't make excuses."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2007 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
JOHN WAYNE would be turning 100 on Saturday, and to mark the occasion, studios with Wayne titles in their vaults are in the throes of reissue madness. Paramount is releasing a 14-film "centennial collection" and a deluxe edition of "True Grit" (1969), which won the Duke his only Oscar. Lionsgate digs into Wayne's 1940s and '50s work with genre house Republic Pictures and emerges with two themed box sets (war flicks and westerns) and six double-feature discs. Warner Bros.
OPINION
April 28, 2007
IT'S AN ODD SORT of feeling, as if a parallel universe had been plopped on top of the northeastern corner of Los Angeles. The hills of Elysian Park are over there on one side, right where they should be, with cars whizzing up and down the Golden State Freeway at their base. On the other side is the western slope of Mount Washington, with its charming houses and black walnut groves.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Restaurant operator Chevy's Inc. agreed to acquire a chain of 66 Mexican-style restaurants from Applebee International Inc. for $53 million in cash, expanding its reach into the Southeast and Midwest markets. San Francisco-based Chevy's, which operates restaurants primarily in the Western U.S., said it will spend about $6 million to bring the Rio Bravo Cantina franchisees into its network of almost 100 Fresh Mex restaurants.
SPORTS
March 27, 1993
Regarding the Jim Murray column of March 14, in which he writes: "What would golf have done if (Arnold Palmer) had retired at the age (Bjorn Borg) did? It'd be like John Wayne getting shot in the second reel of 'Rio Hondo.' " Wayne made a film called "Hondo" and two called "Rio Lobo" and "Rio Bravo," but no "Rio Hondo." KENNETH G. SMITH Los Angeles
OPINION
April 28, 2007
IT'S AN ODD SORT of feeling, as if a parallel universe had been plopped on top of the northeastern corner of Los Angeles. The hills of Elysian Park are over there on one side, right where they should be, with cars whizzing up and down the Golden State Freeway at their base. On the other side is the western slope of Mount Washington, with its charming houses and black walnut groves.
SPORTS
July 9, 1989 | Alan Drooz
Several sports will have a different scheduling look next season in the West Coast Athletic Conference, and the WCAC could move to the forefront of collegiate soccer in the 1990s as a result of recent league meetings. The biggest immediate news was a change in basketball and baseball scheduling--the WCAC will go back to playing conference basketball games on Thursdays and Saturdays, and baseball teams will again play home-and-home three-game series.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1989
As a graduate student of Chicano history, I felt compelled to write in response to Ray Chavira's comment regarding Cinco de Mayo ("Trouble at Cinco de Mayo Events Could Doom Future Festivals," by Michael J. Ybarra and George Ramos, Metro, May 9). Though I agree with his belief that the holiday has been commercialized and thus is a money-making opportunity for many businesses, I do not think he understands the true significance of the date. The following is an answer to Chavira's question: "What about the real reason for celebrating it?"
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