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NEWS
November 25, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fefi's old, rebuilt surfboard is out of commission at the moment, but his surfer aspirations endure. "My dream is to go professional," he says with quiet determination. For this 13-year-old boy, that won't be easy. To use a metaphor from another sport, Fefi has two strikes against him. In fact, if it weren't for an innovative program called the Surfavela Project, he and about 80 other Rio youths probably wouldn't be surfing at all.
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WORLD
April 21, 2008 | Andres D'Alessandro and Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writers
Brazil is booming. The currency is soaring, people are buying houses and cars at a record pace, and global financiers are keen to invest. The country seems poised to acquire official First World status. But residents of this self-proclaimed city of wonders are worried and angry about a Third World affliction -- dengue fever, the tropical disease spreading in epidemic fashion here. As of Friday, health officials reported that dengue had killed at least 87 people in the state of Rio de Janeiro this year and sickened more than 93,000.
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NEWS
August 5, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
The apartment house holdup on Sorocaba Street was typical of the notorious Red Command, the gang that changed Rio de Janeiro. Springing a flimsy lock on the building's heavy glass door at 5 a.m. on July 9, eight gunmen barged in and quickly took charge of the ground floor. "They put a knife to my ear here," said Jose Anjo Teixeira, the unarmed night watchman. "They socked me in the mouth." He touched his swollen lower lip. "I tried to talk to them to see if they would go away.
SPORTS
July 8, 2007 | Philip Hersh
The United States Olympic Committee has apologized to the people of Brazil and, specifically, Rio de Janeiro, for an incident at the Pan American Games, which open Friday. The incident involved the message "Welcome to the Congo!" written in red ink on a whiteboard at the USOC office in the main media center. A photo of the message, with USOC staffer Kevin Neuendorf standing in front of it, appeared Saturday in a Brazilian newspaper.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1999 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Life is so confusing. Whom do you trust, for example, an Oscar-nominated Brazilian movie or a low-IQ newscast in Los Angeles? Which is the real Rio de Janeiro, in other words, the gray, smudged, impersonal urbanscape of "Central Station" or "the sexiest city on Earth" touted by KABC's "Eyewitness News"? And finally, what does one heavily promoted three-minute story, inserted to snag a larger ratings sweeps audience, say about stereotyping of foreigners in local newscasts?
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A $2.5-million ransom, reportedly paid for the release of a prominent Rio executive and friend of President Fernando Collor de Mello, focused attention here Friday on how lucrative an industry kidnaping has become in Brazil. The Thursday night release of Roberto Medina, 42, made banner headlines in morning papers, crowding news of the Iran earthquake--despite the fact that reports about kidnaping have become routine this year in Brazil.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2003 | From Associated Press
The New York-based Guggenheim organization has had to retrench in recent months because of a drop in revenues, but Rio de Janeiro's government has agreed to pay for building a $170-million museum there that's already stirring controversy. Mayor Cesar Maia, who signed the contract Wednesday in New York, defends the project as the anchor for a much-needed renovation of Rio's rundown port district. He says the cost will not burden taxpayers because the city has a surplus of $618 million.
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a sizzling Sunday afternoon, and an old panhandler known as Nilson is hanging out on a busy corner in the beachside neighborhood of Leblon. His shirt is open at the chest, his cheeks bristle with white stubble, and he is wearing a funny-looking pair of rose-colored glasses slightly askew on his nose. Approaching a parked car where a man waits impatiently for someone, Nilson says: "Look at this."
WORLD
December 16, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Seventy-five Rio de Janeiro state police officers -- most from one of the city's most violent neighborhoods -- were arrested as part of a drug-trafficking investigation. It was not immediately clear what charges the officers faced.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York has been pulling back -- reducing its hours, trimming its staff, postponing exhibitions, closing its SoHo branch, shutting one of its two Las Vegas satellites, ditching a proposal for a Frank Gehry-designed building in lower Manhattan and scrapping a plan for a contemporary art space in Venice, Italy. But despite all the belt-tightening, the museum may be expanding in South America.
WORLD
December 16, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Seventy-five Rio de Janeiro state police officers -- most from one of the city's most violent neighborhoods -- were arrested as part of a drug-trafficking investigation. It was not immediately clear what charges the officers faced.
NEWS
December 15, 2005 | Scott Sandell, Times Staff Writer
BLAME it on Rio: Mention the word "carnaval," and one of the first images that pops into mind is that of scantily clad dancers doing the samba. By contrast, the exhibition "¡Carnaval!" at the UCLA Fowler Museum of Cultural History focuses on the elaborate head-totoe outfits worn in eight cities and villages across Europe and the Americas.
WORLD
February 26, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A Rio de Janeiro samba school sacked its Carnaval artistic director, whose pro-condom parade upset the Catholic Church and whose Kama Sutra float was censored as too steamy. The Grande Rio school fired Joaosinho Trinta just before the floats were judged in this year's world-famous Carnaval. Grande Rio's entry placed 10th.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2003 | From Associated Press
The New York-based Guggenheim organization has had to retrench in recent months because of a drop in revenues, but Rio de Janeiro's government has agreed to pay for building a $170-million museum there that's already stirring controversy. Mayor Cesar Maia, who signed the contract Wednesday in New York, defends the project as the anchor for a much-needed renovation of Rio's rundown port district. He says the cost will not burden taxpayers because the city has a surplus of $618 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York has been pulling back -- reducing its hours, trimming its staff, postponing exhibitions, closing its SoHo branch, shutting one of its two Las Vegas satellites, ditching a proposal for a Frank Gehry-designed building in lower Manhattan and scrapping a plan for a contemporary art space in Venice, Italy. But despite all the belt-tightening, the museum may be expanding in South America.
NEWS
June 12, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A cold spring rain blows through the high-rise canyons, making Luiz Eduardo Soares feel even farther from Rio de Janeiro. Shoulders hunched in his leather jacket, the bearded 46-year-old Brazilian walks the streets hunting for an apartment, rebuilding his life in the anonymity of exile. After 15 months leading Brazil's most ambitious attempt at police reform in memory, he once again has time to read, write and reflect.
NEWS
June 12, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dawn. Hotels at Copacabana and Ipanema rolled out long tongues of red carpet. Helicopters in camouflage paint swept low over the churning surf, and tractors gave the beaches a final grooming. Avenida Atlantico, one of the world's more spectacular and congested boulevards, was empty, sealed off by miles of ribbon and orange traffic cones, guarded by soldiers, and transformed into a raceway for presidential motorcades.
NEWS
June 2, 1992
The U.N. Conference on Environment and Development, opening Wednesday, is expected to bring at least 60 world leaders and 40,000 other people together for 11 days of discussions about ecological destruction, pollution and underdevelopment.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1999 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Life is so confusing. Whom do you trust, for example, an Oscar-nominated Brazilian movie or a low-IQ newscast in Los Angeles? Which is the real Rio de Janeiro, in other words, the gray, smudged, impersonal urbanscape of "Central Station" or "the sexiest city on Earth" touted by KABC's "Eyewitness News"? And finally, what does one heavily promoted three-minute story, inserted to snag a larger ratings sweeps audience, say about stereotyping of foreigners in local newscasts?
NEWS
November 25, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fefi's old, rebuilt surfboard is out of commission at the moment, but his surfer aspirations endure. "My dream is to go professional," he says with quiet determination. For this 13-year-old boy, that won't be easy. To use a metaphor from another sport, Fefi has two strikes against him. In fact, if it weren't for an innovative program called the Surfavela Project, he and about 80 other Rio youths probably wouldn't be surfing at all.
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