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Rio De Los Angeles State Park

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2007 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
Just a few decades ago, the Taylor Yards was a two-mile-long expanse of railroad tracks where trains were coupled together to connect Los Angeles industry to the rest of the nation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2007 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
Just a few decades ago, the Taylor Yards was a two-mile-long expanse of railroad tracks where trains were coupled together to connect Los Angeles industry to the rest of the nation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2011 | By Dean Kuipers
A chunk of acreage along the Los Angeles River could possibly become an expansion of the new-ish Rio de Los Angeles State Park in Cypress Park, depending on a decision by an L.A. developer. The story unfolds in a very good blog post by Damon Nagami on the Natural Resources Defense Council site. The 44-acre parcel, called G2, is a part of the old Taylor Yard railroad complex on the east bank of the Los Angeles River, across the river from Elysian Park and Dodger Stadium. Nagami reports that the NRDC and other community groups involved in what has been a long process to create and expand the Rio de Los Angeles Park are urging developer Trammell Crow Company to drop an option to purchase the land for commercial development.
OPINION
April 27, 2006
Re "Head-first into hazardous waters," Opinion, April 25 Bill Stall needs to look at the world of Southern California: swaths of green lawns, lots of misdirected sprinklers and gutter runoff and uncovered swimming pools. That is why we need the water here in the south. Just like with oil, there is a finite amount to go around, and we need to be aware of that. The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta's decline has been accelerating; it started when water deliveries to the south commenced and has dropped with each increase.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2009 | F. Kathleen Foley
Some call the Los Angeles River the "secret river," a rare section in the heart of the inner city that the Army Corps of Engineers couldn't tame. It's directly across from this unlikely place that "Touch the Water," Julie Hebert's play, is having its world premiere. A mix of contemporary characters, live music and Native American myth, "Water" is the fourth offering in Cornerstone Theater's Justice Cycle, a series examining the effects, both positive and adverse, of specific laws on communities.
OPINION
April 28, 2007
IT'S AN ODD SORT of feeling, as if a parallel universe had been plopped on top of the northeastern corner of Los Angeles. The hills of Elysian Park are over there on one side, right where they should be, with cars whizzing up and down the Golden State Freeway at their base. On the other side is the western slope of Mount Washington, with its charming houses and black walnut groves.
SPORTS
February 25, 2014 | By Eric Maddy
GIRLS' SOCCER SOUTHERN SECTION DIVISION 1 Second round, Wednesday, 3 p.m. unless noted #1 Harvard-Westlake at Los Osos San Clemente at Los Alamitos Huntington Beach at Santa Margarita Villa Park at Alemany #3 Foothill at Mater Dei Upland at Corona del Mar Edison at Capistrano Valley, 5 p.m. #2 Aliso Niguel at Etiwanda     DIVISION 2 Second round, Wednesday, 3 p.m. unless noted /#1 Sunny Hills...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Ronald P. Schafer, who as superintendent of the California state parks' Angeles District pushed to develop urban parks in the core of Los Angeles, has died. He was 53. Schafer had finished competing in a Malibu triathlon Sept. 12 and was eating with friends when he had a stroke. He died Wednesday at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, said his brother, Randy. In a statement, Ruth Coleman, director of California State Parks, said Schafer did everything in life with "tremendous passion" and left behind "a legacy of park protection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2007 | Steve Lopez
"It's probably not a good idea to go into surgery without having paid the anesthesiologist yet," Melanie Winter joked in the admissions office at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center on Monday. But her options were limited. Winter had kidded that she might have to marry one of the volunteers at her nonprofit agency so she could use his health insurance to get a new hip. A friend had suggested she move to Canada for a while and take advantage of its national healthcare system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2009 | Louis Sahagun
Paul Caldera's morning routine as groundskeeper at Los Encinos State Historic Park includes unlocking the gates at 10 a.m., raking pepper tree leaves and feeding the ducks that fly in each morning to lounge in a shady spring-fed pond. Then he clears the pond drains of debris and checks on the resident geese, including one Caldera calls "Bad Boy" because, he said, "it tries to bite my ponytail." "This job is my livelihood. It's a way of life. I feel at home here," said Caldera, 41, who landed the job nearly two years ago. Nodding toward dozens of ducks and geese preening at the water's edge, he added, "those are my babies."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2010 | By Corina Knoll
Growing up next door to Chuy Carburetors in Cypress Park meant Christian Martin got his bicycle tires filled up by brotherly mechanics and, when he got older, his car battery jumped for free. Over the years, additional mom-and-pop auto shops cropped up in his neighborhood, just north of where the 110 and 5 freeways intersect, and Martin, 30, says he'd welcome more. "It's convenient, and they're local so they won't try to rob you," he said. "They're just part of the neighborhood."
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