Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRio Grande
IN THE NEWS

Rio Grande

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
November 1, 2009 | Frank Clifford
More than 60 years after scientists assembled the nuclear bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, lethal waste is seeping from mountain burial sites and moving toward aquifers, springs and streams that provide water to 250,000 residents of northern New Mexico. Isolated on a high plateau, the Los Alamos National Laboratory seemed an ideal place to store a bomb factory's deadly debris. But the heavily fractured mountains haven't contained the waste, some of which has trickled down hundreds of feet to the edge of the Rio Grande, one of the most important water sources in the Southwest.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
March 28, 2014 | By Vincent Bevins
Natal, a breezy beach city with vast blue skies and bright sun 1,220 miles northeast of Rio de Janeiro, has much of the small-town feel common in the surrounding rural regions. Where you'll see soccer: The U.S. takes on Ghana on June 16 at the newly constructed Arena das Dunas in Natal, a towering homage to sea, sun and sand. FIFA is putting up a giant screen at Praia do Forte north of the tourist areas and stadium. In a calm city light on night life and heavy on fresh air, this is probably the best place to take in the action for those without tickets.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 27, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of Texans evacuated their homes as flood waters that ravaged the border town of Del Rio rolled down the Rio Grande toward Laredo. The river was expected to crest 25 to 27 feet above flood level. About 2,000 people living near the river were urged to get out. About 800 had gone to city shelters, Laredo spokesman Marco Alvarado said. The river had covered a park and mall parking lot.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
Something like the border between the United States and Mexico doesn't ordinarily come to mind when considering abstract paintings. Yet for the last two years, Tony de los Reyes has been developing a quirky group of abstractions with exactly that distinctive -- and distinctly political -- edge. Color and line articulating space on canvas bumps up against their contentious counterpart in the North American landscape. Eight large, lush abstractions at Angles Gallery are joined with five smaller studies, plus a suite of eight lithographs.
TRAVEL
March 30, 2008 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Big Bend National Park, Texas Butch Hancock probably isn't the first singer-songwriter to wind up, 35 years after that first promising album, sleeping under a tarp down by the river. But he is the first one I've ever watched wake up. When I crawled out of my tent that chilly morning, he lay a few yards away, flopped near the water's edge, barefaced under the sky. Soon the two of us were lined up with the others for coffee from the camp stove. We had covered 13 miles of the Rio Grande in our rafts the previous day, then camped at the mouth of a canyon, 400-foot limestone walls suddenly jutting into the sky. After dinner, we circled the campfire -- eight customers, three river guides and Hancock, strumming and singing about "bare footprints on the desert sand" and "blue moonlight on the Rio Grande.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1988 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Rio Grande Industries is expected to ask the Interstate Commerce Commission for an accelerated review of its proposed purchase of the Southern Pacific railroad with the aim of completing the process within six months, officials of SP's parent firm said Thursday. Separately, Santa Fe Southern Pacific, parent of SP, said it had filed its plan of divestiture late Wednesday with the ICC for the $1.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2006 | Lianne Hart, Times Staff Writer
Authorities were attempting Tuesday to identify five people believed to have drowned while illegally crossing the swift waters of the Rio Grande into the U.S. The victims -- four men and a woman -- were spotted Monday by a Mexican fisherman in the river near the Texas border town of Rio Grande City. "It's not uncommon to find drowning victims in the river," said Lt. Larry Fuentes of the Starr County Sheriff's Department. "The only thing that was unusual is we found five at one time."
NEWS
November 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
A federal judge has ordered the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to review its designation of a 163-mile stretch of the Rio Grande as a critical habitat for the endangered silvery minnow. U.S. District Judge Edwin Mechem said in the ruling Wednesday that the federal agency's designation is to be "set aside as arbitrary and capricious" but added it would remain in operation for four months or until Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt, who oversees the agency, issues an emergency rule in its place.
NEWS
February 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
A federal judge on Friday reinstated an Immigration and Naturalization Service policy barring political asylum-seekers from traveling beyond the Rio Grande Valley while their applications are pending. Justice Department officials have not disclosed a plan for sheltering the thousands of Central Americans to be held under the restriction. A congressman has said the INS would set up a "tent city" detention camp, but the agency said that was only one of several options under consideration.
SPORTS
March 25, 1986 | VINCE AGUL, Vince Agul, the author, is an advertising account executive who lives in Irvine.
Had it not been for the seriousness of the situation, President Charles Davis of Rio Grande College would probably not have listened to the enthusiastic alumnus, John (Newt) Oliver. But Rio Grande was in big trouble in the fall of 1952. Enrollment at the tiny college in the Southeastern Ohio town of the same name had dipped to fewer than 100 full-time students, the faculty was at 15, and the football program had just folded. Rio Grande was as broke as it could be and still keep the doors open.
NATIONAL
January 25, 2013 | By Michael Haederle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
ALBUQUERQUE - The muddy Rio Grande isn't much to look at as it meanders through southern New Mexico to the Texas border, but its waters are a high-stakes prize in a new legal row unfolding between the neighboring states. This month, Texas asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear its complaint that New Mexico has been diverting water it is obligated to send downstream under the 75-year-old Rio Grande Compact. By allowing its residents to sink nearby wells and pump water from the river, "New Mexico has changed the conditions that existed in 1938 when the compact was executed," the Texas complaint charges.
TRAVEL
July 24, 2011 | By Jay Jones, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On a sultry summer's eve, the tables in the courtyard of the Alys restaurant at La Veta Inn are crowded with folks lingering after they've finished their meals, enjoying the music of local singer-songwriter Will Dudley. Hold on to your hat when you cross La Veta Pass The wind blows strong in Colorado The cowboy crooner isn't forecasting the weather, but he might as well be, because some in the audience will ride the rails in the morning up to La Veta Pass in search of more live music.
SPORTS
March 12, 2011 | Wire reports
Troy Matteson shot a six-under 66 in the Puerto Rico Open to open a three-shot lead as he goes after a third U.S. PGA Tour victory at Rio Grande, Puerto Rico. Matteson seized control at Trump International Golf Club by matching the best score of the day, finishing with seven birdies and a bogey to reach 16 under. Hunter Haas was second after his second straight 68 and Michael Bradley was third at 12 under after a 68. Utah fires Boylen as basketball coach Utah men's basketball coach Jim Boylen was fired Saturday, two days after the Utes ended a second straight losing season with a loss to San Diego State in the quarterfinals of the Mountain West Conference tournament.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2011 | Richard Marosi
The Rio Grande once ran wide and deep behind the four-room house that Pamela Taylor and her husband hammered together more than half a century ago. Migrant workers had to take a ferry upriver to get across from Mexico, and a flood once inundated the family's citrus groves. Over time, the waters receded, the river narrowed and Mexico got closer. Thieves led by a one-legged man stole Taylor's horses from the barn and beans off the stove. Drug smugglers hid marijuana in her bushes. Migrant workers would camp in her front yard and bring her fresh tortillas in the morning.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2009 | Frank Clifford
More than 60 years after scientists assembled the nuclear bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, lethal waste is seeping from mountain burial sites and moving toward aquifers, springs and streams that provide water to 250,000 residents of northern New Mexico. Isolated on a high plateau, the Los Alamos National Laboratory seemed an ideal place to store a bomb factory's deadly debris. But the heavily fractured mountains haven't contained the waste, some of which has trickled down hundreds of feet to the edge of the Rio Grande, one of the most important water sources in the Southwest.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2009 | Tim Rutten
When it came to the subject of biographies, Sigmund Freud was at his most implacable: "Whoever undertakes to write a biography," he said, "binds himself to lying, to concealment, to hypocrisy, to flummery and even to hiding his own lack of understanding. . . . Truth is not accessible; mankind does not deserve it, and wasn't Prince Hamlet right when he asked who could escape a whipping if he had his deserts?" How did Freud feel about autobiographies? Don't ask. In his latest book, newspaper columnist turned novelist turned screenwriter Pete Dexter has taken the literary-psychoanalytic bull by the horns and -- with characteristic and stylish aplomb -- blown smoke in its formidable face.
NEWS
August 31, 1993 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than two years, expectant mothers in this community where the Rio Grande meets the Gulf of Mexico have worried that their babies will be born missing part of their brains or spinal cords. Such birth defects are occurring here at three times the national rate. And no one knows why. The most ominous explanation, however, is proposed by a lawsuit making its way through Texas courts. Nineteen families are blaming their children's deaths and disabilities on pollution from U.S.
NATIONAL
October 17, 2007 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
Betty Perez and John Odgers typically don't share the same canoe -- or much else. She's an Earth mother-type who used to buy health food for an Austin cooperative and now cultivates native plants. He's a former banker turned Minuteman whose post-retirement pursuits include tracking illegal immigrants and packing heat. But Perez and Odgers do have one thing in common: a deep love for the majestic winged creatures that live along the wild banks of the Rio Grande.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Border Patrol has agreed to delay spraying herbicide near the Rio Grande until more talks are held with Mexican officials. U.S. officials say the herbicide, imazapyr, does not harm people or animals, but Mexican officials want to do their own review. Officials from the Department of Homeland Security and the binational agency that oversees the river met Tuesday to discuss the plan to test the herbicide on carrizo cane. The towering plants suck up river water and obscure the banks along much of the Rio Grande, making it difficult for agents to see people crossing the border.
NEWS
March 1, 2009 | Christopher Sherman, Sherman writes for the Associated Press.
When the government announced plans to build a new fence along portions of the Mexican border, residents of this sleepy town along the Rio Grande feared that the barrier would cut them off from their backyards and even destroy some homes. Nearly two years later, the project is almost finished, and the village of Granjeno has managed to hang on -- as have the illegal immigrants who still pour through town by climbing over or walking around the nearly two-mile barricade designed to keep them out. Instead of building a steel fence, the government agreed to turn an existing earthen levee into a stronger concrete one, which was supposed to both keep out illegal traffic and offer the village improved flood protection.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|