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Rioport Inc

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BUSINESS
June 24, 1999 | P.J. Huffstutter
A subsidiary of Diamond Multimedia Systems Inc. will announce today a joint licensing and technology development deal with Microsoft Corp., as well as unveil a new version of its Rio portable MP3 player that can hold twice the digital music as its current device. RioPort Inc., the San Jose-based research arm of Diamond, said the collaboration will allow it and Microsoft to cross-market and incorporate each other's technologies into their products.
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BUSINESS
June 24, 1999 | P.J. Huffstutter
A subsidiary of Diamond Multimedia Systems Inc. will announce today a joint licensing and technology development deal with Microsoft Corp., as well as unveil a new version of its Rio portable MP3 player that can hold twice the digital music as its current device. RioPort Inc., the San Jose-based research arm of Diamond, said the collaboration will allow it and Microsoft to cross-market and incorporate each other's technologies into their products.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1999 | From Reuters
Viacom Inc.'s MTV Networks said Tuesday that music buyers logging onto its various Web sites will be able to securely download music under an agreement with RioPort Inc., a unit of Diamond Multimedia Systems Inc., the maker of the MP3 music player. Under the deal, MTV Networks Online will provide Web content and promotional support, and get an equity stake in RioPort and part of the revenue from selling digitally distributed music, expected to be available in this year's fourth quarter.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2002 | Associated Press
Ken Potashner said Sonicblue Inc. ousted him as chief executive and chairman over an ultimatum he made that board members repay their sweetheart loans early or resign. Potashner said he was fired from the maker of Replay TV after describing his boardroom confrontation on the issue to a newspaper. Potashner's immediate replacement, interim CEO L.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2002 | Jon Healey
RioPort Inc. has taken its first significant step toward offering music online via subscription, obtaining a license to BMG's catalog of songs. The deal, expected to be announced today, is the second this month by BMG, one of the five largest record companies and home to such artists as Whitney Houston and the Foo Fighters. Before BMG announced a deal with Listen.com on Jan. 8, it had not licensed songs to any subscription music service it did not own.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2002 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest record-industry concession to consumer demand, Warner Music Group plans to offer tens of thousands of songs through the Internet in a format that can be burned to CD. The announcement by Warner and online distributor RioPort Inc. is a significant change for Warner. Not only is it making more of its catalog available as singles--more than 30,000 songs instead of the current 300--it is enabling CD burning as a standard feature.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2002 | JON HEALEY, CHUCK PHILIPS and P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With the decision to offer tens of thousands of songs online, the world's two largest record companies have steered onto an unlit road with no clear destination. Universal Music Group and Sony Music Entertainment revealed plans this week to make much of their catalogs available for download at a discount, going far beyond the major labels' previous--and as yet unsuccessful--experiments in online distribution.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2002 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pressplay, a joint venture by Universal Music Group and Sony Music Entertainment, recently overhauled its service to give consumers more of what they want from online music. Now, Pressplay's competitors are pressing Universal and Sony to let them do the same. In particular, they want better access to the two record labels' music catalogs, arguing that it would violate federal antitrust law for the Sony Corp.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2002 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acknowledging that online piracy is forcing dramatic changes in the music industry, the world's two largest record companies are poised to make it easy and cheap for fans to buy--rather than steal--songs off the Internet. The moves by Universal Music Group and Sony Music Entertainment accelerate the industry's transition to an era in which music is distributed electronically.
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