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Riot Aftermath

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1992
The performance of our governments was disgraceful, and spectacularly so during the riots. They take billions from us but can't do the one thing they are obligated to do: protect us. I grieve for the honest, hard-working citizens of Los Angeles and the world whose lives are being destroyed by the thugs of the streets and the statehouses. JAMES H. KRAMER San Clemente
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Jack Jones, a longtime Los Angeles Times reporter who was part of a team that shared the 1966 Pulitzer Prize for the newspaper's coverage of the Watts riots and their aftermath, has died. He was 86. Jones, who retired in 1989, died of lung disease Thursday at his Oceanside home, said his wife, Brie. The Times received the Pulitzer for local reporting for its coverage of the several days of bloodshed and destruction during the Watts riots in August 1965 and for a follow-up series that ran the following October.
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NEWS
May 10, 1992 | CAROLINE KUH
"Apparently the Rodney King verdict has caused much anger as well as racial disputes among (the minorities). My heart goes out to the many Korean merchants whose businesses have been destroyed. I know the hurt (they) must be feeling . . . and the hopelessness they are experiencing." As I stared into the eyes of the Channel 7 reporter as he conveyed these simple words, disgust overwhelmed me.
NEWS
November 30, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crenelated ramparts circle the rim of the fortress like icing piped on pastry. On the ground below, a concrete stairway stands pink and incongruous amid the rubble, its steps descending into the earth, a pastel passage to the underworld. For three health workers helping the International Committee of the Red Cross collect bodies here in northern Afghanistan on Thursday, that's exactly what it turned out to be. They thought it was safe.
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | HOWARD BLUME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The routine is a little different at area schools in the aftermath of the Los Angeles-area riots. In class after class, the science books remained closed and the polynomials unfactored. The street violence became the text, complete with illustrations of burned, looted and boarded-up businesses that students passed on their way to school. Students spoke of anger, excitement, fear and hurt.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | TINA GRIEGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this city left devastated by the recent rioting, some leaders feel they're getting plain tuckered out. There's Mayor Walter Tucker III on the MacNeil-Lehrer NewsHour. Tucker on National Public Radio. Tucker on Channel 5. Tucker on Channel 9. Tucker with President Bush. Tucker with Gov. Pete Wilson. Tucker with the Rev. Jesse Jackson. Tucker in a photograph in The Times, inspecting a fire-damaged store. "He is not the spokesman for the city," disgruntled Councilwoman Bernice Woods said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Riot Aftermath: KCET Channel 28 is developing an hourlong special on the Los Angeles riots that will air on PBS' "Frontline" next season close to the one-year anniversary of the uprising. To document the causes and effects of the strife, KCET is seeking previously unseen home video on the riots or its aftermath.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Get-Along Songs: The single "City of Fallen Angels," a post-riot anthem featuring Kid Frost, Young M.C., the Boys, Hen-Gee, Evil-E and Rick James, will be released in stores today. Proceeds from the project will be donated to the First A.M.E. Church to be used for riot relief. . . . Rodney King's plea for unity during the riots has moved Pat Boone to write his own riot aftermath song. Boone said he will make "Can't We Get Along?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1992
The King beating was no surprise to me. As a black male I have been harassed by the police on a number of occasions. I have friends and relatives who have been harassed and even beaten. So when I saw the tape I was not surprised. But I was surprised that the King video was aired on television for the world to see. I believe most white people were shocked by the tape. Most white people believe that black Americans are just whiners when it comes to racism. So the video of Rodney King gave white people a glimpse of the naked truth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1999 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Knott's Berry Farm will receive a $13,000 bill next week from Buena Park police officials, who have tallied up their tab for quelling thousands of rowdy teenagers who skipped school for a Cinco de Mayo promotion at the park. The amount covers the cost of 69 officers who were sent to the near-riot on the morning of May 5, as well as overtime for the half-dozen officers who had to be called in to help, Buena Park Police Chief Richard M. Tefank said Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1993 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A funny thing happened to South-Central Los Angeles on the way back from the riots. Children there have started laughing at life--including some of the very things that make growing up the inner city so tough. Fifty youngsters have spent the summer studying stand-up comedy. They have learned how to mine their neighborhood for material and to milk it for laughs by using exaggeration and good timing. Take 10-year-old James Cummings. Please.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1993 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Debbie Siler of Compton doesn't fear getting lost in Simi Valley anymore. Recently, "I was driving toward Simi Valley with a friend and I told her, 'Don't worry. If we get lost, I know a police officer out here,' " Siler said. Siler met Detective Gene Hostetler last year at a softball game between South Los Angeles and Simi Valley residents as a way to unite the two communities. The game was congenial and successful, and a second will be played Saturday at 12:30 p.m. at Jesse Owens Park, 9651 S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1993 | ANTHONY MILLICAN and GORDON DILLOW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After K. P. Wang's photo studio was looted and burned during last year's rioting, he began questioning a work ethos forged in his native Taiwan. He had labored seven days a week to turn his Inglewood business into a financial success, much of it at the expense of his family. Trying to make sense out of the destruction of the shop, he began taking stock of what mattered most to him: his wife and two children, ages 8 and 12.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the second night of last spring's riots, Javier Iniquez was dragged from his car and beaten by a crowd of looters while driving home from the Cerritos manufacturing plant where he painted furniture. During the harrowing attack, Iniquez's right hand was badly broken, forcing him to quit his job. But he had reason to hope. When then-President George Bush swept through the city to view the devastation, he took time to talk with Iniquez, who was applying for emergency aid at a disaster center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1993 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two mammoth donations from two major stars--$1.25 million from pop music's Michael Jackson and $1 million from country music's Garth Brooks--have Los Angeles charity officials asking Hollywood a pointed question about its role in helping the city recover from last spring's riots. Is that all there is?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1993 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using techniques honed in political campaigns, union organizing and protests against inner-city liquor stores, two dozen activists hired by the city have begun tackling what may be their most difficult objective yet: defusing tensions in Los Angeles' diverse neighborhoods so two upcoming, highly volatile trials do not prompt another round of riots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1992 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unprecedented action, the 700-member Council of Korean Churches in Southern California tonight will host a Festival of Reconciliation to bring together hundreds of religious leaders from Anglo, Latino, African-American and Asian-American churches for an evening of worship, dialogue and food. "This is a real Korean-style janchi (feast)," said the Rev. Paul Yang, pastor of Orange Korean Christian Reformed Church, a member of the festival organizing committee.
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