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OPINION
August 13, 2000
Re "Halt to Alleged Surveillance of Activists Sought," Aug. 9: The leaders and attorneys for the "protesters" continue to insist that nonviolence is their watchword. They want the L.A. public to ignore injured police officers in Philadelphia, several of whom were splashed with acid. They want us to believe that their "puppets" are mere 1st Amendment props, but the puppets in other cities have been found to hide tools of illegal activity and have been used to send signals to commence illegal activities.
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WORLD
August 14, 2012 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
PARIS - French President Francois Hollande said Tuesday that his government would use "all means" necessary to quell violence after overnight rioting in northern France left more than a dozen police officers injured and several buildings damaged or destroyed. Hollande, who was elected in May, pledged that public security would be a priority for his fledgling Socialist administration. French police said rioting youths opened fire on them amid violent clashes Monday evening on the outskirts of Amiens, troubled by high rates of unemployment and crime.
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NEWS
February 16, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Indonesia's parliament endorsed the military's policy of shooting rioters on sight, amid fresh bloodshed at both ends of the vast archipelago. At least 20 people died over the weekend in renewed Christian-Muslim violence in the eastern region once known as the Spice Islands and two more in the restive western province of Aceh, officials said. The parliament endorsed armed forces commander Gen. Wiranto's orders to his troops to shoot rioters or troublemakers on sight. Wiranto's deputy, Maj. Gen.
WORLD
August 13, 2011 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
With calm returning to Britain's damaged cities, residents of some London neighborhoods complained Friday that police had seemed unwilling or unprepared to take on rioters who set fire to cars and looted shops on their streets. Officials said that about 1,700 arrests had been made nationwide, but Scotland Yard added that the number was "changing all the time. " Londoners who endured the worst of the violence Monday and Tuesday nights had mixed views of the police response. Lia Smith, who runs a cafe on Clarence Roadin the low-income East London neighborhood of Hackney, said she watched police in riot gear line up at the end of the road as a crowd moved in Monday evening.
NEWS
November 13, 1987 | Associated Press
Rioting inmates demanding better conditions and more paroles at the St. Maur maximum security prison in central France released all 12 of their hostages today and surrendered, ending a 17-hour insurrection, officials said.
WORLD
December 21, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of rioters battled police in central Athens, firebombing a credit reporting agency and attacking the city's Christmas tree two weeks after the police shooting of a teenager set off Greece's worst unrest in decades. The violence followed a memorial gathering where 15-year-old Alexandros Grigoropoulos died Dec. 6, in the Athens neighborhood of Exarchia. The rioters, using the National Technical University of Athens as a base, launched attacks against police, throwing rocks and gasoline bombs and erecting roadblocks.
NEWS
May 9, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo ordered aides to work out the release of more than 100 rioters arrested during a May Day attack on the presidential palace, saying this is "a time of healing." But she also stressed that her government will not back down in its efforts to prosecute opposition leaders accused of masterminding the palace attack as part of an alleged plot to seize power.
NEWS
August 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
Masked rioters hurling gasoline bombs and rocks clashed with riot police in the streets of Londonderry today, the 20th anniversary of the deployment of British troops in the city. Officers arrested an Irish-American activist. Martin Galvin, a New York lawyer and publicity director of the Irish Northern Aid Committee, was accused of violating a ban on entering British territory.
WORLD
July 14, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Nationalist rioters attacked police with bricks, bottles and other missiles, wounding at least seven officers on a day of parades by the pro-British Orange Order. Police responded to the rioting by hundreds of youths in the mainly Roman Catholic Ardoyne area of north Belfast with water cannons and plastic bullets. At least one gunshot was fired at police. The nationalists would like to see Northern Ireland united with Ireland; the Orange Order is made up of Protestants who want Northern Ireland to remain a British province.
WORLD
August 10, 2011 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
Prime Minister David Cameron promised Wednesday that Britain would end the chaos caused by rioters who have looted and burned neighborhoods in London and other cities. Though London, where the trouble began late Saturday, was calming down, rioters took to the streets in cities such as Manchester and Birmingham, wrecking businesses and homes. In Birmingham, three young men who were guarding a neighborhood and its mosque were run down and killed by a driver suspected of being a rioter.
WORLD
August 11, 2011 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
Haggard lawyers rushed around searching for clients or killed time waiting for paperwork Thursday at Westminster Magistrates Court in central London while bewildered defendants facing riot-related charges wondered about their fate. Inevitable delays interrupted proceedings as an overloaded court system attempted to cope with crowded basement cells and a constant stream of security vans carrying defendants mainly accused of offenses such as looting and violent behavior. "Chaos reigns downstairs," one defense lawyer told presiding Judge Daphne Wickham.
WORLD
August 10, 2011 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
Prime Minister David Cameron promised Wednesday that Britain would end the chaos caused by rioters who have looted and burned neighborhoods in London and other cities. Though London, where the trouble began late Saturday, was calming down, rioters took to the streets in cities such as Manchester and Birmingham, wrecking businesses and homes. In Birmingham, three young men who were guarding a neighborhood and its mosque were run down and killed by a driver suspected of being a rioter.
WORLD
August 10, 2011 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
They share a city, and very little else. But one thing united the rioters who have left a trail of shattered glass and burned-out buildings across London and the residents left to clean up the mess: anger. Facing a storm of criticism for remaining on vacation while his city burned, London Mayor Boris Johnson returned Tuesday to tour Clapham, a well-off south London neighborhood that was one of many stunned by three nights of hopscotching riots that left one man dead and littered the urban landscape with hundreds of damaged businesses and residences.
NEWS
July 18, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
At least four people were killed after police and rioters clashed in China's restive Xinjiang province Monday, the official New China News Agency said. Authorities in the western frontier city of Hotan opened fire on a mob after it attacked a police station, set it on fire and took hostages, the report said. One police official, a security guard and two hostages were killed in the incident, the report said. Dilxat Raxit of the World Uyghur Congress told Reuters that police opened fire on peaceful demonstrators, which sparked the fighting.
WORLD
May 6, 2010 | Anthee Carassava, Carassava is a special correspondent.
At least three people were killed Wednesday in Athens when rioters set a bank ablaze during protests by tens of thousands of people over austerity measures demanded by a multibillion-dollar international bailout of Greece. A 24-hour national strike morphed into the strongest – and most violent – show of defiance yet over the austerity plan as millions of workers walked off the job and thousands took to the streets to vent their anger against the government. In Athens, at least 100,000 protesters stormed the sprawling grounds of parliament, jeering at politicians and chanting, "Thieves, thieves!"
WORLD
July 14, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Nationalist rioters attacked police with bricks, bottles and other missiles, wounding at least seven officers on a day of parades by the pro-British Orange Order. Police responded to the rioting by hundreds of youths in the mainly Roman Catholic Ardoyne area of north Belfast with water cannons and plastic bullets. At least one gunshot was fired at police. The nationalists would like to see Northern Ireland united with Ireland; the Orange Order is made up of Protestants who want Northern Ireland to remain a British province.
NEWS
March 19, 1986 | Associated Press
Thousands of striking workers rioted in the capital Tuesday to protest economic austerity measures recently imposed by the government. The rioters stoned passing vehicles and sacked offices and stores. Police said several people were injured and a number of rioters arrested.
NEWS
December 26, 1985
Police fired plastic bullets and one live round when 40 to 50 rioters attacked them overnight with bricks and bottles in Armagh, Northern Ireland, a police spokesman said. One officer suffered serious facial injuries during the clashes in the town near the border with the Irish Republic, the spokesman said. He said the live round was fired into the air. The identity of the rioters was not immediately established.
WORLD
July 6, 2009 | Barbara Demick
China's worst ethnic violence in years broke out Sunday in the northwestern city of Urumqi, leaving 140 people dead and more than 800 injured. The unrest pitted Uighurs, a long-aggrieved Muslim minority, against the Han Chinese, who increasingly dominate the far-flung Xinjiang region. With the death toll climbing over the course of the day, the violence appeared to be far deadlier than that last year in the Tibetan region.
WORLD
June 27, 2009 | Borzou Daragahi
A senior cleric who is close to Iran's supreme leader said in a Friday sermon that anyone who engaged in violence in protests over alleged fraud in the reelection of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad should receive the "severest of punishments," according to state broadcasting. Ayatollah Ahmad Khatami, a confidant of supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, described the unsanctioned public gatherings and rallies as being against Islamic law.
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