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Riots Afghanistan

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OPINION
May 17, 2005
According to chaos theory, the flapping of a single butterfly's wings can trigger a hurricane halfway across the globe, a phenomenon known as the "butterfly effect." Now the Bush administration thinks it has detected something that might be called the "Newsweek effect." It says the magazine's publication of an item in its May 9 issue, alleging that U.S.
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WORLD
May 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
Muslims spat on the American flag, threw tomatoes at a picture of President Bush and burned the U.S. Constitution in protests Friday from Egypt to Indonesia over the alleged desecration of Islam's holy book at the Guantanamo Bay prison. Waving copies of the Koran, many of the thousands of demonstrators across the Middle East and Asia chanted anti-U.S. slogans and demanded an apology from the United States, as well as punishment for those who had treated the book with disrespect at the U.S.
OPINION
May 17, 2005 | Irshad Manji, Irshad Manji is author of "The Trouble With Islam Today," recently published in paperback by St. Martin's Press.
So Newsweek has retracted its report about the defiling of Islam's holy book, the Koran, by interrogators at Guantanamo Bay. But it's too late. Muslims everywhere are questioning America's respect for all religions. Journalists are wondering what standards allowed the charge to be printed without proof. Foreign policy analysts are asking how the riots incited by the charge will affect the war on terrorism.
NATIONAL
May 17, 2005 | James Rainey and Mark Mazzetti, Times Staff Writers
Newsweek on Monday retracted an article that said the U.S. military had confirmed that an interrogator at the Guantanamo Bay prison flushed a copy of the Koran down the toilet -- a report blamed for helping to trigger rioting in Afghanistan that killed at least 14 people.
WORLD
September 12, 2012 | Reem Abdellatif and Ned Parker
Angry crowds attacked U.S. diplomatic posts in Egypt and Libya on Tuesday, killing an American diplomat, after a video appeared on the Internet that protesters said insulted Islam, providing a graphic illustration of the volatile mood remaining in countries that threw off authoritarian rule in the "Arab Spring" uprisings. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said in a statement that one State Department official had been killed at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, and that officials were working to secure the property and personnel.
WORLD
May 24, 2005 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
President Bush promised Monday to continue U.S. military and economic aid to Afghanistan, but resisted pressure from Afghan President Hamid Karzai to yield control of Afghan prisoners and U.S. military operations in the country. After a White House meeting, the two leaders released a joint statement declaring their countries strategic partners. But on two subjects that have recently caused friction, Bush said that U.S.
WORLD
September 11, 2012 | By Reem Abdellatif and Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Angry crowds attacked U.S. diplomatic posts in Egypt and Libya on Tuesday, killing an American diplomat, after a video appeared on the Internet that protesters said insulted Islam, providing a graphic illustration of the volatile mood remaining in countries that threw off authoritarian rule in the "Arab Spring" uprisings. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said in a statement that one State Department official had been killed at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, and that officials were working to secure the property and personnel.
NATIONAL
May 27, 2005 | John Hendren, Times Staff Writer
A military investigation has found that U.S. troops mishandled Korans of Muslim prisoners five times at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, but found "no credible evidence" to support a detainee's claim that a holy book was flushed down a toilet, the prison's commander said Thursday. The investigation looked into 13 allegations that the book had been treated improperly, and it determined that five incidents "could be broadly defined as mishandling" of a Koran, Army Brig. Gen.
WORLD
March 25, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
  Lately, it has seemed that the Taliban can just sit back and wait for the next American mistake. Over the last three months, a series of highly damaging events has forced U.S. commanders and officials to adopt a posture of nonstop crisis management. Even so, the insurgents have not taken full advantage of the American setbacks, in part because the movement appears divided over its own strategy. This month, the Taliban leadership abruptly suspended preliminary peace contacts with the Americans, a move seen by some as tactical and temporary, but interpreted by others as reflecting internal argument over whether negotiations were even worthwhile at this point.
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By James Rainey
It's obvious Mitt Romney wants badly to change the tenor of the presidential race, in which he has struggled for months to find a way to push ahead of President Obama. It became clear just how badly the Republican presidential candidate will reach for a game-changing moment when late Tuesday, and again Wednesday, he effectively issued a full-throated defense of the Free Speech rights of that hate-mongering Florida pastor, Terry Jones. Romney might not have mentioned Jones' name but that was the gist of his statements, with the candidate - in a fanciful contortion of fact and logic - accusing President Obama of being more sympathetic with Muslim protesters than with the American diplomats they attacked in Cairo and Benghazi, Libya.
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