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Riots Argentina

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NEWS
February 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Poor residents of the Argentine city of Rosario looted food stores and delivery trucks despite the efforts of police to keep order. Many of the looters were women and children, a news service reported. Similar looting last year grew to riots in which 16 people were killed and 200 injured. The cost of living soared by 79% last month in Argentina.
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WORLD
August 14, 2002 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a month, the case of 17-year-old Diego Peralta moved the residents of this city, becoming the most visible symbol of the crime wave gripping recession-ravaged Argentina. Diego was kidnapped while headed to school July 5 and held by a band of criminals who demanded $200,000 in ransom. His fate became a cause celebre. Even President Eduardo Duhalde worked to win his release.
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NEWS
September 6, 1987
A 19-year-old political activist was killed and at least 11 other people were seriously injured in a burst of campaign violence before Argentine national elections today, police and radio reports said. About 50 people were arrested in incidents that included shootings, rock-throwing and fistfights between rival party activists. The National Electoral Bureau announced that about 70,000 military and police personnel will patrol polling stations as Argentines elect governors and national deputies.
NEWS
December 21, 2001 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Fernando de la Rua resigned Thursday as tens of thousands of Argentines defied a state of siege he had declared less than 24 hours earlier when violence tore through the recession-ravaged country. De la Rua stepped down after opposition legislators in the Peronist party declined his offer to form a government of national unity, the president's last hope of holding on to power after two days of rioting that shook many of the nation's largest cities.
SPORTS
July 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Two people died and nearly 200 were arrested after street celebrations turned violent Wednesday following Argentina's Tuesday victory over Italy in a World Cup semifinal match. Thousands in the country celebrated Argentina's advance to the World Cup final, but revelry turned chaotic when several hundred youths began breaking into shops in Buenos Aires.
NEWS
December 21, 2001 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Fernando de la Rua resigned Thursday as tens of thousands of Argentines defied a state of siege he had declared less than 24 hours earlier when violence tore through the recession-ravaged country. De la Rua stepped down after opposition legislators in the Peronist party declined his offer to form a government of national unity, the president's last hope of holding on to power after two days of rioting that shook many of the nation's largest cities.
WORLD
August 14, 2002 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a month, the case of 17-year-old Diego Peralta moved the residents of this city, becoming the most visible symbol of the crime wave gripping recession-ravaged Argentina. Diego was kidnapped while headed to school July 5 and held by a band of criminals who demanded $200,000 in ransom. His fate became a cause celebre. Even President Eduardo Duhalde worked to win his release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1989
Food riots in Argentina, a nation once renown for its prosperity and the self-assurance of its people, are the latest warning signs of the terrible toll being taken throughout Latin America by a prolonged economic crisis. A dozen people died and hundreds were injured and arrested as a result of rioting and looting in several Argentine cities, including some of the poorer suburbs of Buenos Aires, the nation's normally genteel and civilized capital. The riots were apparently sparked by popular frustration at the latest efforts by outgoing President Raul Alfonsin to stem a runaway inflation (estimated at 70% last month alone)
NEWS
May 20, 2001 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Desperate times breed desperate crimes. Argentine criminals are taking hostages at an unprecedented rate, an apt metaphor for a nation alarmed about converging social, economic and political crises. The country records two hostage incidents a day, according to a recent study by the federal security secretariat, 80% of them in the greater Buenos Aires area, which is home to almost half the population.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2001 | TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the consequences of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks may be that investors' threshold of fear is significantly higher now than before the attacks. That could go a long way toward explaining why otherwise stunning disasters such as Enron Corp.'s financial collapse and the meltdown of Argentina's economy haven't been able to rattle global markets much, or for long. After seeing the World Trade Center implode, what used to pass for scary now pales in comparison. An altered sense of what is truly frightening also may be affecting investors' perception of the U.S. economy and how it will fare in 2002.
SPORTS
July 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Two people died and nearly 200 were arrested after street celebrations turned violent Wednesday following Argentina's Tuesday victory over Italy in a World Cup semifinal match. Thousands in the country celebrated Argentina's advance to the World Cup final, but revelry turned chaotic when several hundred youths began breaking into shops in Buenos Aires.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Poor residents of the Argentine city of Rosario looted food stores and delivery trucks despite the efforts of police to keep order. Many of the looters were women and children, a news service reported. Similar looting last year grew to riots in which 16 people were killed and 200 injured. The cost of living soared by 79% last month in Argentina.
NEWS
September 6, 1987
A 19-year-old political activist was killed and at least 11 other people were seriously injured in a burst of campaign violence before Argentine national elections today, police and radio reports said. About 50 people were arrested in incidents that included shootings, rock-throwing and fistfights between rival party activists. The National Electoral Bureau announced that about 70,000 military and police personnel will patrol polling stations as Argentines elect governors and national deputies.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1989 | Allan H. Meltzer, ALLAN H. MELTZER is J. M. Olin Professor of Political Economy and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University and a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute
The late C. Northcote Parkinson accurately described some of the whimsical features of modern bureaucratic organizations, such as "work expands to fill up available employee time" or "organizations grow even as their responsibilities decline." The International Monetary Fund is an example of the latter aphorism. The IMF's reason for being disappeared in 1971, but the IMF is now bigger and more costly than it was 20 years ago. Soon, it will ask the taxpayers of major countries for more money.
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