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Riots Armenia

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September 26, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of rioters broke into Armenia's parliament building Wednesday but were forced back by gunfire and truncheon-wielding police after hours of fighting. More than two dozen people were reported injured, including parliament Speaker Babken Ararktsyan. Calling the night of chaotic bloodshed a "coup attempt" by leaders of the crowd--opponents of President Levon A.
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NEWS
September 26, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of rioters broke into Armenia's parliament building Wednesday but were forced back by gunfire and truncheon-wielding police after hours of fighting. More than two dozen people were reported injured, including parliament Speaker Babken Ararktsyan. Calling the night of chaotic bloodshed a "coup attempt" by leaders of the crowd--opponents of President Levon A.
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NEWS
April 16, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armenians armed with gasoline, burning torches and flare guns besieged KGB headquarters in their capital and tried unsuccessfully to destroy it as violence erupted anew in the Soviet Caucasus republic after a nearly three-month lull, official media and residents reported Sunday. The Soviet state security agency said one man was mortally wounded when a homemade bomb he was carrying blew up in his hands, also seriously injuring a girl.
NEWS
April 16, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armenians armed with gasoline, burning torches and flare guns besieged KGB headquarters in their capital and tried unsuccessfully to destroy it as violence erupted anew in the Soviet Caucasus republic after a nearly three-month lull, official media and residents reported Sunday. The Soviet state security agency said one man was mortally wounded when a homemade bomb he was carrying blew up in his hands, also seriously injuring a girl.
NEWS
April 10, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In its first break with the British government over tactics in the Persian Gulf, the Bush Administration said Tuesday that Prime Minister John Major's plan for a Kurdish haven in northern Iraq appears unnecessary and might even interfere with efforts to feed and protect refugees from Saddam Hussein's oppression. A senior Administration official said that Washington is not unsympathetic to Major's objectives but that the United States and its allies already have ample authority from the U.N.
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