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Riots France

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December 8, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Protesters ran amok in the chic, palm-lined streets of the Riviera's main resort city and police fought back with tear gas and stun grenades Thursday as the European Union opened its most important meeting in a decade. For the rioters, an assorted collection of leftist revolutionaries, anarchists and separatists, the 15-nation EU, which began as a customs union fostering greater intra-European trade, is a cog in the process of globalization that they blame for many of the modern world's ills.
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TRAVEL
November 13, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
AS France's worst rioting in decades spread from the suburbs of Paris to scores of towns last week, the governments of several Western countries urged travelers to exercise caution. But central Paris, home to the Eiffel Tower and other tourist sites, appeared to be unaffected, and the governments of the U.S., Britain, Canada and several other nations stopped short of warning against travel to France.
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NEWS
April 1, 1994 | Associated Press
The worst violence in three weeks of student protests exploded here Thursday when renegade youths used the cover of a parade to smash cars and shops and attack police and journalists. Police said 48 officers were injured and about 300 people arrested. The parade drew 25,000 students celebrating the suspension of a plan to reduce entry-level wages.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Protesters ran amok in the chic, palm-lined streets of the Riviera's main resort city and police fought back with tear gas and stun grenades Thursday as the European Union opened its most important meeting in a decade. For the rioters, an assorted collection of leftist revolutionaries, anarchists and separatists, the 15-nation EU, which began as a customs union fostering greater intra-European trade, is a cog in the process of globalization that they blame for many of the modern world's ills.
NEWS
November 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
Youths wrecked stores and stoned riot police Monday as more than 100,000 high school students nationwide joined marches demanding more teachers, better facilities and improved security on campus. Authorities said that most of the marchers in more than a dozen cities were orderly. But scores of youths threw stones, bottles and barricades at riot police deployed near the National Assembly building in Paris, where lawmakers opened debate on the 1991 education budget.
NEWS
June 25, 1991 | Reuters
A third consecutive night of violence in this southern French town left 14 riot police injured, three of them seriously, in clashes with youths, police said Monday. Fifty to 70 youths, many wielding iron bars and throwing firebombs, were involved in the latest flare-up Sunday night, they said. Locals said most of the rioters were the children of harkis , the Arab name for Algerians who fought on the French side during the Algerian war and who sought safety in France in the 1960s.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
France airlifted 800 of its 3,000 citizens out of the African oil city of Port Gentil in Gabon after riots against President Omar Bongo spawned widespread looting, officials said. Two people were killed and 17 were injured in the riots, Gabon's official daily L'Union said. Bongo blamed the introduction of a multi-party system for the unrest that began after an opposition party leader's mysterious death.
TRAVEL
November 13, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
AS France's worst rioting in decades spread from the suburbs of Paris to scores of towns last week, the governments of several Western countries urged travelers to exercise caution. But central Paris, home to the Eiffel Tower and other tourist sites, appeared to be unaffected, and the governments of the U.S., Britain, Canada and several other nations stopped short of warning against travel to France.
OPINION
November 13, 2005
We turn to France, whose decision to stay out of the Iraq war is starting to make more sense. After all, why go all the way to the Mideast when you can fight Muslims in your very own suburbs? -- JON STEWART The streets of the suburb of Clichy-sous-Bois have been filled with angry, mostly unemployed Arab and African immigrants setting fire to hundreds of cars. Their message: We're mad as hell, and we're not going to let you park here anymore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1993 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They mimic the walk, the talk--the at- tee- tude--of their gangster-rapping idols, shuffling in their baggies under the Art Nouveau arches of the Paris Metro stations, the in-yo'- visage lyrics of Dr Dre and Public Enemy thumping in their ears. The Parisian versions of L.A.'
NEWS
April 1, 1994 | Associated Press
The worst violence in three weeks of student protests exploded here Thursday when renegade youths used the cover of a parade to smash cars and shops and attack police and journalists. Police said 48 officers were injured and about 300 people arrested. The parade drew 25,000 students celebrating the suspension of a plan to reduce entry-level wages.
NEWS
June 25, 1991 | Reuters
A third consecutive night of violence in this southern French town left 14 riot police injured, three of them seriously, in clashes with youths, police said Monday. Fifty to 70 youths, many wielding iron bars and throwing firebombs, were involved in the latest flare-up Sunday night, they said. Locals said most of the rioters were the children of harkis , the Arab name for Algerians who fought on the French side during the Algerian war and who sought safety in France in the 1960s.
NEWS
November 13, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A massive march by high school students calling for education reforms, including more security in schools, erupted into some of the worst street violence in more than 20 years here Monday as groups of demonstrators looted stores, burned cars and battled police on a Paris bridge.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
France airlifted 800 of its 3,000 citizens out of the African oil city of Port Gentil in Gabon after riots against President Omar Bongo spawned widespread looting, officials said. Two people were killed and 17 were injured in the riots, Gabon's official daily L'Union said. Bongo blamed the introduction of a multi-party system for the unrest that began after an opposition party leader's mysterious death.
OPINION
December 31, 2005
EUROPE USED TO BE SPLIT BY rivalries between monarchs. Then came the bloodthirsty military dictators. Nowadays European battle lines are drawn mostly over competing economic theories, which might lead to a few flaming Renaults in Parisian suburbs and some political turmoil but on balance represents progress. That's about the best spin to put on European affairs in 2005, when the phrase "European Union" was more than ever a contradiction in terms.
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