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Riots Jordan

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NEWS
August 19, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jordan's King Hussein blamed "foreign circles" Sunday for inciting the worst rioting in his country since he cautiously ushered in democratic reforms seven years ago, but critics said the government had foolishly ignored warnings that doubling bread prices would cause unrest. Eleven opposition parties demanded the resignation of Prime Minister Karim Kabariti, whose pro-Western, market-oriented government ordered the price increases.
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NEWS
August 23, 1996 | From Associated Press
King Hussein accused a foreign government Thursday of instigating food riots, a reference to Iraq that is likely to escalate tensions between the neighbors. "I have confessions here that many of the disturbances that occurred in Jordan were incited from outside with decisions, backing, commitments and instigation from governments," Hussein said in a nationally televised speech.
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NEWS
August 23, 1996 | From Associated Press
King Hussein accused a foreign government Thursday of instigating food riots, a reference to Iraq that is likely to escalate tensions between the neighbors. "I have confessions here that many of the disturbances that occurred in Jordan were incited from outside with decisions, backing, commitments and instigation from governments," Hussein said in a nationally televised speech.
NEWS
August 22, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Jordan has released about two-thirds of the 300 people arrested during bread riots last week, security sources said. The government released about 200 detainees for lack of evidence but will prosecute the rest in connection with the riots that erupted Friday in the southwestern towns of Al Karak, Maan and At Tafilah and spread to Amman, the capital.
NEWS
August 17, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
As many as 1,000 Muslim worshipers protesting increased bread prices clashed with police in at least two towns, injuring 14 people, witnesses said. The wounded included several police officers hit by stones, according to a government employee. Police used tear gas to disperse the crowds in the southern communities of Karak and Maan and made an unspecified number of arrests. There were conflicting accounts about the protests and the number of casualties.
NEWS
August 22, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Jordan has released about two-thirds of the 300 people arrested during bread riots last week, security sources said. The government released about 200 detainees for lack of evidence but will prosecute the rest in connection with the riots that erupted Friday in the southwestern towns of Al Karak, Maan and At Tafilah and spread to Amman, the capital.
NEWS
August 18, 1996 | From Reuters
Riots over bread prices spread Saturday from the south of Jordan to the teeming center of Amman, the capital, despite King Hussein's threat of an "iron fist" response. The king was shown on television telling soldiers in the south that the country faced a choice of order or anarchy. But clashes continued in the south, and new ones erupted in Amman. Residents in the Hay al Tafailah area fired shots at police who used tear gas to try to disperse them, witnesses said.
NEWS
August 20, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The government deployed hundreds of troops to quell three days of rioting by citizens protesting a sharp rise in bread prices. Scores of armored personnel carriers were stationed at key intersections, and the army announced an indefinite curfew following protests in the southwestern Jordanian towns of Al Karak, At Tafilah and Maan that have injured at least 40 people.
NEWS
February 8, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Riot police fired tear gas to disperse hundreds of angry Jordanians, many of them schoolchildren, who stoned food trucks bound for Saudi Arabia. About 500 police, backed by 27 armored personnel carriers, two tanks and 15 jeeps mounted with machine guns, staged a massive show of force at Ramtha, near the Syrian border, after a Wednesday riot in which about 1,000 Jordanians attacked a convoy of 63 Syrian and Turkish trucks carrying food to Saudi Arabia, police said.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | From Times wire services
Mourners rioted today at the funeral of a boy killed during protests of government price increases, and one man died when police opened fire, residents said. Another report said a policeman also was slain.
NEWS
August 20, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The government deployed hundreds of troops to quell three days of rioting by citizens protesting a sharp rise in bread prices. Scores of armored personnel carriers were stationed at key intersections, and the army announced an indefinite curfew following protests in the southwestern Jordanian towns of Al Karak, At Tafilah and Maan that have injured at least 40 people.
NEWS
August 19, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jordan's King Hussein blamed "foreign circles" Sunday for inciting the worst rioting in his country since he cautiously ushered in democratic reforms seven years ago, but critics said the government had foolishly ignored warnings that doubling bread prices would cause unrest. Eleven opposition parties demanded the resignation of Prime Minister Karim Kabariti, whose pro-Western, market-oriented government ordered the price increases.
NEWS
August 18, 1996 | From Reuters
Riots over bread prices spread Saturday from the south of Jordan to the teeming center of Amman, the capital, despite King Hussein's threat of an "iron fist" response. The king was shown on television telling soldiers in the south that the country faced a choice of order or anarchy. But clashes continued in the south, and new ones erupted in Amman. Residents in the Hay al Tafailah area fired shots at police who used tear gas to try to disperse them, witnesses said.
NEWS
August 17, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
As many as 1,000 Muslim worshipers protesting increased bread prices clashed with police in at least two towns, injuring 14 people, witnesses said. The wounded included several police officers hit by stones, according to a government employee. Police used tear gas to disperse the crowds in the southern communities of Karak and Maan and made an unspecified number of arrests. There were conflicting accounts about the protests and the number of casualties.
NEWS
February 8, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Riot police fired tear gas to disperse hundreds of angry Jordanians, many of them schoolchildren, who stoned food trucks bound for Saudi Arabia. About 500 police, backed by 27 armored personnel carriers, two tanks and 15 jeeps mounted with machine guns, staged a massive show of force at Ramtha, near the Syrian border, after a Wednesday riot in which about 1,000 Jordanians attacked a convoy of 63 Syrian and Turkish trucks carrying food to Saudi Arabia, police said.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | From Times wire services
Mourners rioted today at the funeral of a boy killed during protests of government price increases, and one man died when police opened fire, residents said. Another report said a policeman also was slain.
NEWS
September 10, 1992 | MICHAEL S. ARNOLD, SPECIAL TO NUESTRO TIEMPO
About 350 high school students, most of them Latinos, may find it harder to reach college since the U.S. Department of Education denied funding for three Upward Bound college preparation programs in Los Angeles County. UCLA, Cal State Northridge and East Los Angeles College are appealing to retain funding for their long-established programs, which target students in specific high schools across the county.
OPINION
September 8, 1996 | Howard R. Teicher, Howard R. Teicher, author, with Gayle Radley Teicher, of "Twin Pillars to Desert Storm" (Morrow), served on the staff of the National Security Council from 1982-87
U.S. cruise-missile attacks, expansion of the southern "no-fly zone" to include the outskirts of Baghdad and suspension of the U.N. deal allowing Iraq to sell oil again surely "impose a price" on Saddam Hussein for taking sides in the Kurdish civil war. But U.S. action alone probably won't change the Iraqi president's penchant for outlaw behavior or significantly enhance U.S. power in the Persian Gulf. Indeed, keenly aware that most U.S.
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