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Riots Kazakhstan

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NEWS
February 27, 1992 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of soldiers rioted at Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan after complaining of "inhuman treatment" by their superiors, news services said Wednesday. Three soldiers were reported burned to death. The rioters, soldiers assigned to construction work, commandeered 17 trucks, set fire to four barracks and stole 35,000 rubles from a cashier's office, the Interfax news agency and Commonwealth television reported. The victims were found inside one of the charred barracks.
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NEWS
February 27, 1992 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of soldiers rioted at Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan after complaining of "inhuman treatment" by their superiors, news services said Wednesday. Three soldiers were reported burned to death. The rioters, soldiers assigned to construction work, commandeered 17 trucks, set fire to four barracks and stole 35,000 rubles from a cashier's office, the Interfax news agency and Commonwealth television reported. The victims were found inside one of the charred barracks.
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OPINION
April 10, 1988 | Roy Medvedev, Roy Medvedev, a Soviet citizen, is a historian whose works have been published in the West
Riots in Kazakhstan in December, 1986, demonstrations by the Crimean Tartars in Moscow, marches in the Baltic region in 1987-88, isolated incidents in Yakutia and Uzbekistan, rising activism by the Russian "patriotic" society Pamyat, the continuing emigration from the Soviet Union of Jews and ethnic Germans and, finally, the developing conflict now between Azerbaijan and Armenia--all these events point to the sharpening of national problems in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
November 7, 1987 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
If Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev is to succeed in revitalizing the world's second-largest economy, he must gain increasing control over the huge and inherently conservative bureaucracy of the Communist Party. There is no evidence of organized political opposition to Gorbachev, but the Soviet leader has acknowledged the existence of rising resistance to reforms from within the party, a political machine whose power extends across two continents and into every corner of Soviet society.
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