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April 2, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The government, in a bid to promote national reconciliation, apologized Friday to the South Korean people for the bloody repression of the 1980 Kwangju uprising, and offered compensation for hundreds of people killed and wounded by troops. "The government offers its sincere apology, not only to the victims of the turmoil, but also to all residents of Kwangju and the general public," Culture and Information Minister Chung Han Mo said in a statement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2007 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
Korean Americans have two expressions that reflect the ongoing, often visceral forces unleashed during the Los Angeles riots of 1992. One is saigu, which stands for April 29, 1992, the day thousands of Korean Americans -- many of them uninsured or underinsured -- lost their life savings in the looting and fires.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2007 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
Korean Americans have two expressions that reflect the ongoing, often visceral forces unleashed during the Los Angeles riots of 1992. One is saigu, which stands for April 29, 1992, the day thousands of Korean Americans -- many of them uninsured or underinsured -- lost their life savings in the looting and fires.
NEWS
April 2, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The government, in a bid to promote national reconciliation, apologized Friday to the South Korean people for the bloody repression of the 1980 Kwangju uprising, and offered compensation for hundreds of people killed and wounded by troops. "The government offers its sincere apology, not only to the victims of the turmoil, but also to all residents of Kwangju and the general public," Culture and Information Minister Chung Han Mo said in a statement.
NEWS
May 30, 1986 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
A major breakthrough in efforts to amend South Korea's repressive constitution was achieved Thursday when leaders of the ruling and opposition parties agreed to establish a National Assembly committee to draft reforms "guaranteeing the people a free choice of government." The agreement came at a 3 1/2-hour dinner meeting attended by Roh Tae Woo, chairman of the governing Democratic Justice Party, and Lee Min Woo, head of the opposition New Korea Democratic Party.
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