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Riots Nigeria

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NEWS
March 1, 2000 |
As fighting between Christians and Muslims spreads to Nigeria's southeast, the government and leaders from the mostly Muslim north agreed to back away from calls for Islamic law in an effort to end the bloodshed that has wracked Nigeria for a week.
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NEWS
September 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Ethnic and religious clashes in the central Nigerian city of Jos have killed at least 165 people and injured 928 in three days, and the violence has spread to other towns, Red Cross officials said. "We just received a report from our men in Jos that fighting spread to Langtang, Pankshin, Kuru and Heipang where people were killed yesterday," said Abiodun Orebiyi, acting secretary-general of the Nigerian Red Cross. Heipang and Kuru are on Jos' outskirts and include its airport.
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NEWS
September 9, 2001 | From Reuters
Soldiers collected more bodies from the streets of the city of Jos overnight as authorities tightened a curfew to deal with looting in the aftermath of bloody religious riots, officials said. "We don't have a total casualty figure yet, but we're talking of more than 20 bodies retrieved from the streets so far," said an official of the central Nigerian state of Plateau, whose capital is Jos.
NEWS
September 9, 2001 | From Reuters
Soldiers collected more bodies from the streets of the city of Jos overnight as authorities tightened a curfew to deal with looting in the aftermath of bloody religious riots, officials said. "We don't have a total casualty figure yet, but we're talking of more than 20 bodies retrieved from the streets so far," said an official of the central Nigerian state of Plateau, whose capital is Jos.
NEWS
February 22, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Rioting Muslim and Christian youths seized parts of the northern Nigerian city of Kaduna in clashes over a proposal to bring Islamic law to Kaduna state. More than 20 people were killed, witnesses said. The violence began when hundreds of Christian demonstrators marched through the streets chanting "No to Sharia! No to Sharia!"
NEWS
February 29, 1992 | From Associated Press
Unpaid soldiers mutinied Friday and seized the state radio station and two civilian leaders. They freed the hostages after being promised back pay, but hours later took over the broadcast center again. No casualties were reported, though thousands of students marched into town to protest the revolt. Mutineers' demands have included the immediate return to the capital of Prime Minister Amadou Cheffou, who is away; dismissal of several army officers and release of another officer from prison.
NEWS
July 7, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
At least 11 people were reported killed in Lagos as tens of thousands of people set fires and blocked roads to demand an end to military dictatorship. It was the first report of deaths since Lagos protesters began pressuring the government on Monday to recognize the annulled June 12 presidential election that was to end a decade of military rule. The reported winner, businessman Moshood K. O. Abiola, appealed to people to resist the dictatorship of Gen.
NEWS
November 9, 1988
Thousands of Nigerians, angry at the choice of a new sultan to lead the country's 50 million Muslims, rioted in a northwestern town, burning government offices and freeing 2,000 prisoners. State-run Radio Nigeria mentioned no casualties and did not estimate damage in three days of rioting and demonstrations in Sokoto, a predominantly Muslim town 465 miles north of the capital of Lagos.
NEWS
May 2, 1998 | Associated Press
Nigerian police fired into a crowd of thousands Friday when a rally to demand Gen. Sani Abacha's ouster turned into a violent rampage. Witnesses said seven people were killed. Three bodies were lying in the streets of the southern city of Ibadan after the shooting, witnesses said. The shooting began after the crowd began setting cars, shops and houses ablaze.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | Times Wire Services
Amid reports of new clashes that left hundreds dead, Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo on Wednesday decried the religious violence that has racked his country, mourning that Nigerians have lost their "sense of moral outrage." Police estimated that 200 to 400 people have died in three days of revenge attacks for clashes last week between Christians and Muslims in the northern city of Kaduna that killed more than 300.
NEWS
March 6, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a recent evening in this steamy city that rims a lagoon, about 80,000 fans poured into the streets after a soccer game. Some waved banners or chanted slogans to celebrate a victory in an Africawide tournament. In such situations, emotions and frustrations tend to boil over in Nigeria's bustling commercial capital, a traditional hotbed of opposition politics. But the atmosphere this time was elated but calm, a mood more typical of Nigerians since civilian rule was restored in May.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | Times Wire Services
Amid reports of new clashes that left hundreds dead, Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo on Wednesday decried the religious violence that has racked his country, mourning that Nigerians have lost their "sense of moral outrage." Police estimated that 200 to 400 people have died in three days of revenge attacks for clashes last week between Christians and Muslims in the northern city of Kaduna that killed more than 300.
NEWS
March 1, 2000 |
As fighting between Christians and Muslims spreads to Nigeria's southeast, the government and leaders from the mostly Muslim north agreed to back away from calls for Islamic law in an effort to end the bloodshed that has wracked Nigeria for a week.
NEWS
February 29, 2000 | From Reuters
Scores of people were killed in rioting in southeastern Nigeria in a backlash against last week's northern religious bloodletting, as violence in Africa's most populous nation appeared to be spinning out of control.
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo and religious leaders warned of a real danger to the unity of Africa's most populous nation Wednesday after riots between Christians and Muslims left more than 100 people dead. Troops and police patrolled the city of Kaduna, where violence erupted Monday at a demonstration by Christians against calls by Muslims for the adoption of strict Islamic law in Kaduna state, in Nigeria's north.
NEWS
February 22, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Rioting Muslim and Christian youths seized parts of the northern Nigerian city of Kaduna in clashes over a proposal to bring Islamic law to Kaduna state. More than 20 people were killed, witnesses said. The violence began when hundreds of Christian demonstrators marched through the streets chanting "No to Sharia! No to Sharia!"
NEWS
March 4, 1999 | From Associated Press
Militants stoned five police officers to death and set their station ablaze Wednesday, and security forces retaliated by firing into crowds as anger over the results of Nigeria's presidential election exploded into street battles. At least eight people were killed Wednesday in election-related violence, witnesses said. Other reports cited up to 14 deaths. Violence has plagued parts of Lagos since Olusegun Obasanjo won Saturday's presidential election.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Troops in armored cars and helicopters quelled religious rioting that resulted in the deaths of more than 200 Muslims and Christians in the northern Nigerian state of Kaduna over three days, police said. Hundreds of injured people were crowded into hospitals. The clashes began Sunday in a land dispute.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Troops were told to shoot curfew breakers in Nigeria's oil industry hub of Warri after a fourth day of arson and killing blamed on ethnic rivalries brought the death toll to 10. State authorities imposed a 6 p.m.-to-6 a.m. curfew and troops were told to shoot anybody caught breaking it. Barely a week after taking office to end 15 years of military rule, elected President Olusegun Obasanjo said he would visit the area this week and then come up with policies to bring lasting peace.
NEWS
March 4, 1999 | From Associated Press
Militants stoned five police officers to death and set their station ablaze Wednesday, and security forces retaliated by firing into crowds as anger over the results of Nigeria's presidential election exploded into street battles. At least eight people were killed Wednesday in election-related violence, witnesses said. Other reports cited up to 14 deaths. Violence has plagued parts of Lagos since Olusegun Obasanjo won Saturday's presidential election.
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