Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRiots Panama
IN THE NEWS

Riots Panama

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | Reuters
Twelve people were shot and more than 100 were treated for injuries here after protests against a hike in bus fares turned ugly, officials said Thursday. Thousands of stone-throwing students and workers battled with police and looted stores late into the night Wednesday in what officials described as the worst outbreak of street violence in Panama since a U.S. invasion in 1989. Police said they arrested 67 people, including 16 minors.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | Reuters
Twelve people were shot and more than 100 were treated for injuries here after protests against a hike in bus fares turned ugly, officials said Thursday. Thousands of stone-throwing students and workers battled with police and looted stores late into the night Wednesday in what officials described as the worst outbreak of street violence in Panama since a U.S. invasion in 1989. Police said they arrested 67 people, including 16 minors.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 160 U.S. soldiers suffered mostly minor injuries in two days of riots by rock-throwing Cuban refugees who are increasingly frustrated by their detention in Panama camps, Pentagon officials said here Thursday. The soldiers, most of whom suffered cuts and bruises, were hurt Wednesday night and Thursday when more than 1,000 refugees broke out of three chain-link-enclosed campsites and commandeered military vehicles in an attempt to flee the area near the Panama Canal.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two Cubans were found dead in the Panama Canal following riots in Cuban refugee camps this week, a U.S. military official said. The official could not say how the two died, but Panamanian police said on television that they had drowned. About 1,000 Cubans escaped after rioting Wednesday and Thursday in two camps; all but 31 returned voluntarily or were apprehended.
NEWS
November 1, 1994 | Reuters
Five U.S. soldiers and three Cuban refugees were injured during a stone-throwing confrontation at one of the Cuban refugee camps in Panama, the U.S. military said Monday. A group of about 50 to 75 Cuban refugees threw stones at U.S. soldiers and tore down a gate late Sunday at one of four camps where the United States holds about 9,000 Cuban boat people, U.S. military officials said. A dispute among the Cubans over cigarettes sparked the incident, a military official said. One U.S.
NEWS
December 8, 1987
A former military officer whose accusations against Panama strongman Gen. Manuel A. Noriega triggered riots and a political crisis last summer appeared in court in Panama City and pleaded guilty to a charge of inciting violence against the government, Judge Albino Alain said. State-run television aired silent film clips from the unannounced appearance in which Col. Roberto Diaz Herrera appeared for the first time in court since he and 40 others were arrested four months ago.
NEWS
March 9, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Opponents of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega threw up burning barricades across scores of downtown streets here Tuesday as the unpopular leader's government, beleaguered at home and abroad, attempted to arouse fears of American intervention by claiming that long-planned U.S. military maneuvers here are "a prelude to the armed invasion of Panama."
NEWS
March 15, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Dockworkers paralyzed Panama's two main ports and riot police tear-gassed protesting schoolteachers in this capital Monday as the embattled regime of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega searched for stopgap solutions to the country's economic and political crisis. The work stoppage at the ports and the teachers' demonstration were provoked by the inability of the government to pay the salaries of the affected workers.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two Cubans were found dead in the Panama Canal following riots in Cuban refugee camps this week, a U.S. military official said. The official could not say how the two died, but Panamanian police said on television that they had drowned. About 1,000 Cubans escaped after rioting Wednesday and Thursday in two camps; all but 31 returned voluntarily or were apprehended.
NEWS
June 22, 1987 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
After four years as Panama's strongman, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega is being seriously challenged by popular unrest over alleged corruption, vote fraud and political murder. The worst rioting since the military seized power in 1968 has forced him to suspend civil liberties, censor the press and deploy combat troops to help the police make hundreds of arrests.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 160 U.S. soldiers suffered mostly minor injuries in two days of riots by rock-throwing Cuban refugees who are increasingly frustrated by their detention in Panama camps, Pentagon officials said here Thursday. The soldiers, most of whom suffered cuts and bruises, were hurt Wednesday night and Thursday when more than 1,000 refugees broke out of three chain-link-enclosed campsites and commandeered military vehicles in an attempt to flee the area near the Panama Canal.
NEWS
November 1, 1994 | Reuters
Five U.S. soldiers and three Cuban refugees were injured during a stone-throwing confrontation at one of the Cuban refugee camps in Panama, the U.S. military said Monday. A group of about 50 to 75 Cuban refugees threw stones at U.S. soldiers and tore down a gate late Sunday at one of four camps where the United States holds about 9,000 Cuban boat people, U.S. military officials said. A dispute among the Cubans over cigarettes sparked the incident, a military official said. One U.S.
NEWS
March 15, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Dockworkers paralyzed Panama's two main ports and riot police tear-gassed protesting schoolteachers in this capital Monday as the embattled regime of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega searched for stopgap solutions to the country's economic and political crisis. The work stoppage at the ports and the teachers' demonstration were provoked by the inability of the government to pay the salaries of the affected workers.
NEWS
March 9, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Opponents of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega threw up burning barricades across scores of downtown streets here Tuesday as the unpopular leader's government, beleaguered at home and abroad, attempted to arouse fears of American intervention by claiming that long-planned U.S. military maneuvers here are "a prelude to the armed invasion of Panama."
NEWS
December 8, 1987
A former military officer whose accusations against Panama strongman Gen. Manuel A. Noriega triggered riots and a political crisis last summer appeared in court in Panama City and pleaded guilty to a charge of inciting violence against the government, Judge Albino Alain said. State-run television aired silent film clips from the unannounced appearance in which Col. Roberto Diaz Herrera appeared for the first time in court since he and 40 others were arrested four months ago.
NEWS
July 3, 1987
Riot police dispersed hundreds of rock-throwing who had joined in new anti-government protests in Panama City, while a group of armed men set fire to a building owned by the publishers of an opposition newspaper as the police looked on. Authorities later ordered Radio Mundial, a privately owned opposition station, closed for allegedly inciting public disorders. Witnesses said several students were hurt.
NEWS
July 3, 1987
Rock-throwing students clashed with riot police outside Panama's National University as protests resumed against the military-dominated government. Students erected barricades to block a key intersection near the campus in Panama City. Police later moved in to dismantle the barricades, causing most of the students to flee. The demonstration followed the lifting of a nationwide state of emergency on Tuesday, the same day government supporters attacked the U.S. Embassy to protest last week's U.S.
NEWS
June 22, 1987 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
After four years as Panama's strongman, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega is being seriously challenged by popular unrest over alleged corruption, vote fraud and political murder. The worst rioting since the military seized power in 1968 has forced him to suspend civil liberties, censor the press and deploy combat troops to help the police make hundreds of arrests.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|