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October 5, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following Moscow's bloodiest political battle since the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, the leaders of a 13-day parliamentary rebellion surrendered Monday after tanks punched holes in the Russian White House and left it aflame. As the Parliament building burned, hundreds of "White House defenders" streamed out of the blackened marble fortress with their hands on their heads. Soldiers loyal to President Boris N.
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NEWS
October 5, 1993
Russia's political standoff, day by day: Sept. 21: President Boris N. Yeltsin announces he is disbanding Parliament and calls new elections in December. Hard-line lawmakers meet in emergency session, vote to impeach Yeltsin and appoint Vice President Alexander V. Rutskoi as president. Sept. 22: Military and police stick with Yeltsin. Downtown crowds cheer the president. Lawmakers' calls for a nationwide strike go unheeded. Sept.
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NEWS
February 24, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police brandishing nightsticks clashed Sunday with hard-line Communist demonstrators as they tried to force their way to the Kremlin to mark the 74th anniversary of the Red Army with an anti-government rally. It was the first time violence has been used to control a mass demonstration since Boris N. Yeltsin was elected president of Russia in May, 1990. The protesters, chanting "Yeltsin resign!"
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | Reaction to Monday's events in Moscow:
"Russia's democracy has learned a hard lesson. It is that democracy must be able to defend itself, and have enough strength to do it." --Vyacheslav Kostikov, Yeltsin spokesman * "What this will do is remind Europeans in a very rude way of the fact that there are still some very serious dangers out there. . . . Whenever there is real unrest in the East, it will make people tend to look to Washington again.' --Martin Van Heuven, senior consultant, RAND Corp.
NEWS
October 5, 1993
Russia's political standoff, day by day: Sept. 21: President Boris N. Yeltsin announces he is disbanding Parliament and calls new elections in December. Hard-line lawmakers meet in emergency session, vote to impeach Yeltsin and appoint Vice President Alexander V. Rutskoi as president. Sept. 22: Military and police stick with Yeltsin. Downtown crowds cheer the president. Lawmakers' calls for a nationwide strike go unheeded. Sept.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | Reaction to Monday's events in Moscow:
"Russia's democracy has learned a hard lesson. It is that democracy must be able to defend itself, and have enough strength to do it." --Vyacheslav Kostikov, Yeltsin spokesman * "What this will do is remind Europeans in a very rude way of the fact that there are still some very serious dangers out there. . . . Whenever there is real unrest in the East, it will make people tend to look to Washington again.' --Martin Van Heuven, senior consultant, RAND Corp.
NEWS
October 4, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration indicated for the first time Sunday that it is willing to support the use of force by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin to quell an armed insurrection by forces loyal to his parliamentary foes.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Russia's worst political violence since the 1991 attempted coup, Communists marching in a May Day demonstration clashed Saturday with Moscow police in a prolonged melee of flying bricks and swinging truncheons that left more than 140 injured. "Fascists!" yelled several dozen young men from the protesters' ranks as they charged the barricades set up by police to keep them from straying from their officially approved route. "Yeltsin is a Judas!"
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a special prayer service Sunday to promote a peaceful resolution of Russia's intensifying political crisis, Orthodox Patriarch Alexi II delivered a stern warning: Whoever spilled the first blood would be excommunicated. Following his dramatic and successful assault on Parliament headquarters at the Russian White House, President Boris N. Yeltsin has political, rather than ecclesiastical, reasons to convince the public that the other side fired first.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With every ear-shattering thud of a tank shell, Irina Vladimirovna Frolova's heart skipped a beat. The retired, white-haired sewing machine operator stood Monday afternoon on the opposite bank of the Moscow River from the Parliament, risking her life with thousands and thousands of fellow Russians to watch the battle unfolding before her eyes.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following Moscow's bloodiest political battle since the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, the leaders of a 13-day parliamentary rebellion surrendered Monday after tanks punched holes in the Russian White House and left it aflame. As the Parliament building burned, hundreds of "White House defenders" streamed out of the blackened marble fortress with their hands on their heads. Soldiers loyal to President Boris N.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a special prayer service Sunday to promote a peaceful resolution of Russia's intensifying political crisis, Orthodox Patriarch Alexi II delivered a stern warning: Whoever spilled the first blood would be excommunicated. Following his dramatic and successful assault on Parliament headquarters at the Russian White House, President Boris N. Yeltsin has political, rather than ecclesiastical, reasons to convince the public that the other side fired first.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With every ear-shattering thud of a tank shell, Irina Vladimirovna Frolova's heart skipped a beat. The retired, white-haired sewing machine operator stood Monday afternoon on the opposite bank of the Moscow River from the Parliament, risking her life with thousands and thousands of fellow Russians to watch the battle unfolding before her eyes.
NEWS
October 4, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration indicated for the first time Sunday that it is willing to support the use of force by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin to quell an armed insurrection by forces loyal to his parliamentary foes.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Russia's worst political violence since the 1991 attempted coup, Communists marching in a May Day demonstration clashed Saturday with Moscow police in a prolonged melee of flying bricks and swinging truncheons that left more than 140 injured. "Fascists!" yelled several dozen young men from the protesters' ranks as they charged the barricades set up by police to keep them from straying from their officially approved route. "Yeltsin is a Judas!"
NEWS
February 24, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police brandishing nightsticks clashed Sunday with hard-line Communist demonstrators as they tried to force their way to the Kremlin to mark the 74th anniversary of the Red Army with an anti-government rally. It was the first time violence has been used to control a mass demonstration since Boris N. Yeltsin was elected president of Russia in May, 1990. The protesters, chanting "Yeltsin resign!"
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