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Riots Somalia

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NEWS
July 26, 1989
Somali President Mohamed Siad Barre fired two Cabinet ministers, accusing them of anti-government activities, the official Sonna news agency reported. Maj. Gen. Aden Abdullahi Nur and Mohammed Abdulleh Baadleh, both ministers-without-portfolio, were charged with "activities inimical to the sovereignty, unity and security of the country."
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NEWS
February 25, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the failures of crowd control in the Los Angeles riots comes the futuristic hope for a bloodless U.N. pullout from Somalia. Sid Heal, a muscle-strapped lieutenant with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, watched law enforcement stumble and struggle to contain anarchy in the 1992 civil disturbances. "I was not real happy with the way the riots went," he said. Later, the 44-year-old Heal listened as the U.S.
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NEWS
February 28, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the first day of peace since rioting and gun battles ripped through the heart of the Somali capital and rattled the very foundations of the U.S.-led Operation Restore Hope, a small crowd of Somalis gathered Saturday around Abdi Aden's tiny barbershop and took stock of America's future in this still deeply troubled land.
NEWS
July 13, 1993 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. military forces firing from U.S. gunships blasted the command center of fugitive Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid in a Monday morning raid in Mogadishu, just a mile from the bustling city center where thousands of Somalis were going about their daily routines. A furious Somali mob armed with rocks, knives and guns turned on foreign journalists trying to assess the damage. Two journalists were killed in the melee, one was seriously wounded, and two others were missing and feared dead.
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From his gunner's position in the turret of a patrol Humvee, Marine Sgt. James Church was singing rock 'n' roll tunes and shouting "Howya doin' " to waving women and children Sunday as he swiveled and scanned the horizon of a suddenly hostile land. Then the rock hit. Then came gunfire from a few hundred yards off. And, throughout the two-hour patrol, Church's finger stayed close to the trigger of his mounted machine gun.
NEWS
February 26, 1993 | From Associated Press
U.S. Marines and Nigerian soldiers pounded at snipers with machine guns and grenades for five hours Thursday, shutting down relief activity in this devastated city with the heaviest shooting in weeks. One Somali was killed and three U.S. Marines and two Nigerian soldiers were wounded in the firefight in an area rocked by anti-foreigner rioting Wednesday that left at least five Somalis dead. Sniper fire hit the hotel where most foreign journalists stay. U.N.
NEWS
July 13, 1993 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. military forces firing from U.S. gunships blasted the command center of fugitive Somali warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid in a Monday morning raid in Mogadishu, just a mile from the bustling city center where thousands of Somalis were going about their daily routines. A furious Somali mob armed with rocks, knives and guns turned on foreign journalists trying to assess the damage. Two journalists were killed in the melee, one was seriously wounded, and two others were missing and feared dead.
NEWS
July 22, 1989 | From United Press International
A human rights group said Friday that security forces in Somalia arrested about 2,000 people after religious disturbances last week and killed more than 300, bringing the week's death toll to 450, including 46 people taken to a beach and shot. New York-based Africa Watch, in a report based on interviews with residents of the Somali capital of Mogadishu, said 90 civilians and 20 soldiers died in fighting outside the city's mosques a week earlier.
NEWS
February 25, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Hundreds of screaming Somali youths hurled rocks, lumber and scrap metal at U.S.-led troops, built fiery barricades and attacked two embassies here Wednesday to protest a victory by a rival warlord they said was helped by the coalition forces. Some reports put casualties at up to five Somalis killed and 15 wounded. Other witnesses said U.S. troops had shot and killed at least nine Somalis. At least two U.S. Marines were also wounded. Maj. Ken Roberts, a U.S.
NEWS
February 25, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the failures of crowd control in the Los Angeles riots comes the futuristic hope for a bloodless U.N. pullout from Somalia. Sid Heal, a muscle-strapped lieutenant with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, watched law enforcement stumble and struggle to contain anarchy in the 1992 civil disturbances. "I was not real happy with the way the riots went," he said. Later, the 44-year-old Heal listened as the U.S.
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From his gunner's position in the turret of a patrol Humvee, Marine Sgt. James Church was singing rock 'n' roll tunes and shouting "Howya doin' " to waving women and children Sunday as he swiveled and scanned the horizon of a suddenly hostile land. Then the rock hit. Then came gunfire from a few hundred yards off. And, throughout the two-hour patrol, Church's finger stayed close to the trigger of his mounted machine gun.
NEWS
February 28, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the first day of peace since rioting and gun battles ripped through the heart of the Somali capital and rattled the very foundations of the U.S.-led Operation Restore Hope, a small crowd of Somalis gathered Saturday around Abdi Aden's tiny barbershop and took stock of America's future in this still deeply troubled land.
NEWS
February 26, 1993 | From Associated Press
U.S. Marines and Nigerian soldiers pounded at snipers with machine guns and grenades for five hours Thursday, shutting down relief activity in this devastated city with the heaviest shooting in weeks. One Somali was killed and three U.S. Marines and two Nigerian soldiers were wounded in the firefight in an area rocked by anti-foreigner rioting Wednesday that left at least five Somalis dead. Sniper fire hit the hotel where most foreign journalists stay. U.N.
NEWS
February 25, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Hundreds of screaming Somali youths hurled rocks, lumber and scrap metal at U.S.-led troops, built fiery barricades and attacked two embassies here Wednesday to protest a victory by a rival warlord they said was helped by the coalition forces. Some reports put casualties at up to five Somalis killed and 15 wounded. Other witnesses said U.S. troops had shot and killed at least nine Somalis. At least two U.S. Marines were also wounded. Maj. Ken Roberts, a U.S.
NEWS
July 26, 1989
Somali President Mohamed Siad Barre fired two Cabinet ministers, accusing them of anti-government activities, the official Sonna news agency reported. Maj. Gen. Aden Abdullahi Nur and Mohammed Abdulleh Baadleh, both ministers-without-portfolio, were charged with "activities inimical to the sovereignty, unity and security of the country."
NEWS
July 22, 1989 | From United Press International
A human rights group said Friday that security forces in Somalia arrested about 2,000 people after religious disturbances last week and killed more than 300, bringing the week's death toll to 450, including 46 people taken to a beach and shot. New York-based Africa Watch, in a report based on interviews with residents of the Somali capital of Mogadishu, said 90 civilians and 20 soldiers died in fighting outside the city's mosques a week earlier.
WORLD
January 7, 2007 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
By launching a war against Somalia's Islamists, Ethiopia says it was drawing a line in the sand against religious extremism in East Africa. But without quick diplomacy and international aid, analysts caution that the war could radicalize the region's traditionally moderate Muslims. "This could bode ill for both Somalia and eastern Ethiopia, but perhaps even northern Kenya," said John Prendergast, Africa analyst at International Crisis Group, a conflict-resolution think tank based in Washington.
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