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Riots South Africa

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NEWS
August 11, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Rioting spread from the South African city of Port Elizabeth to neighboring Uitenhage on Friday, and South African police said 42 people had been shot dead since Monday. Maj. Bill Dennis said police and soldiers worked side by side through the night to restore order after five days of rioting in Colored (mixed race) areas of Port Elizabeth.
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NEWS
April 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
A stampede of fans inside and outside an overcrowded soccer stadium Wednesday night killed 43 people and injured at least 150 others, South African officials said. At least 27 bodies lay strewn on the field after the cancellation of the match between the Kaizer Chiefs and Orlando Pirates at Ellis Park Stadium. Several others lay outside the stadium. A stream of ambulances, private cars and a helicopter delivered injured fans to Johannesburg Hospital.
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NEWS
June 17, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1976 Soweto student uprising, which sparked a generation of black resistance to apartheid, was remembered on its 15th anniversary Sunday by thousands of South Africans, from the mother of the first young victim to the leader of the African National Congress. In the treeless Avalon Cemetery of Soweto, Dorothy Pietersen and two dozen friends huddled early Sunday near the grave of her son, Hector Pietersen.
NEWS
March 13, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Three people were killed and 14 wounded--some by stray gunfire--during a Zulu nationalist march held to commemorate the deaths of more than 50 people at a 1994 protest before the nation's first all-race elections. Tribal leaders presided Wednesday over 12,000 Zulus who came from township hostels and swarmed Johannesburg's streets. Violence erupted among some of the marchers traveling to Johannesburg.
NEWS
June 21, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Frederik W. de Klerk felt the rising heat of black anger with his government Saturday when a seething township mob pelted his car with rocks and forced him to hastily abort a visit to the scene of last week's massacre in Boipatong. Heavily armed police later opened fire on hundreds of demonstrators with tear gas, rubber bullets and birdshot, killing at least one man and injuring more than a dozen others.
NEWS
December 31, 1990 | United Press International
A policeman and four civilians were shot or stabbed to death in political and factional black violence in strife-torn Natal province, police said Sunday. The violence followed an outburst of fighting in black townships of the Indian Ocean province on Friday that left 12 people dead in the most serious clashes since Christmas Day.
NEWS
February 4, 1988
Factional strife between rival black organizations spilled into the white South African city of Pietermaritzburg, and 46 blacks were arrested after street fights broke out. Police and eyewitnesses said three blacks were seriously injured after a busload of followers of the Zulu Inkatha organization, armed with machetes and sticks, drove into the Natal provincial capital and attacked the offices of the Congress of South African Trade Unions, the country's main black labor federation.
NEWS
February 3, 1988
Black schools were closed and workers stayed away from their jobs out of fear for their safety in the violence-torn Pietermaritzburg area of South Africa, the Congress of South African Trade Unions reported. The area has been the site of bloody feuding between the United Democratic Front, a nationwide anti-apartheid coalition, and Inkatha, a more conservative group headed by Zulu leader Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi.
NEWS
April 23, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Police shot to death six blacks during street battles in Johannesburg on Wednesday after South Africa's state-run railroad fired more than 16,000 striking workers. The clashes, some of the worst in recent months, heightened tensions once again in the black townships around Johannesburg, and union officials warned that further violence may follow as blacks react to the deaths.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a biographer of Nelson R. Mandela offered the African National Congress a look at her new book a few months ago, rebel leader Oliver R. Tambo asked her to take out the tender love letters that Mandela had written from prison to his wife, Winnie. "He thought it wasn't dignified for a man of Mandela's stature," recalled author Fatima Meer. But Mandela overruled his former law partner, telling Meer: "You leave it all in. It's true. There's no reason for us to hide these things."
NEWS
February 7, 1997 | Associated Press
Images reminiscent of South Africa's bitter past reappeared Thursday when mixed-race rioters looted, burned tires and fought police in townships around Johannesburg to protest alleged discrimination by the black-led government. At least one person died, and more than 100 were injured, including six police officers, in the worst racial unrest since President Nelson Mandela defeated Frederik W. de Klerk and came to power in 1994.
NEWS
August 12, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Rioting erupted when police and troops moved in on a march in Cape Town by armed Muslim vigilantes who have vowed to eradicate drug dealing by local gangs. Police fired rubber bullets and tear gas at the vanguard of 5,000 marchers, mostly young men wearing head scarfs and chanting "Allahu Akbar!" (God is Great!) who tried to break through the fourth roadblock the police had erected.
NEWS
June 21, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Frederik W. de Klerk felt the rising heat of black anger with his government Saturday when a seething township mob pelted his car with rocks and forced him to hastily abort a visit to the scene of last week's massacre in Boipatong. Heavily armed police later opened fire on hundreds of demonstrators with tear gas, rubber bullets and birdshot, killing at least one man and injuring more than a dozen others.
NEWS
February 24, 1992 | Reuters
Three people died in overnight clashes at Empangeni, scene of fighting last week between the warring African National Congress and Inkatha Freedom Party, and both sides claimed that the victims were theirs. Police said two men were also killed in fighting near Johannesburg and Cape Town, pushing the weekend toll in township violence to 12 dead with at least 18 others hurt in shootings, street fights and a hand grenade blast.
NEWS
February 10, 1992 | From Associated Press
Black factional violence killed 14 people across South Africa, including a regional official of the African National Congress, police said Sunday. The ANC official, Sikhumbuzo Ngwenya, was shot to death late Saturday as he left a restaurant in Pietermaritzburg, police and the ANC said. Ngwenya was an ANC leader in the black township of Imbali outside the city.
NEWS
August 10, 1991 | From Reuters
South African neo-Nazis and police clashed before a meeting addressed by President Frederik W. de Klerk Friday, and three white extremists and a black passerby were killed, police said. Right-wingers, most of them members of the white supremacist Afrikaanse Weerstandsbeweging (AWB), fought running battles with riot police before De Klerk's arrival in Ventersdorp, the AWB's stronghold. Witnesses said police opened fire with live ammunition, and AWB supporters fired back.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The African National Congress announced Saturday that it has suspended plans for its historic first meeting with the South African government in protest over the "unprovoked killing and maiming of defenseless demonstrators" by police in Sebokeng township last week. "If the government talks about negotiations on the one hand and murders our people on the other--that we cannot accept," Nelson R. Mandela, the ANC deputy president, told a rally Saturday.
NEWS
June 17, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1976 Soweto student uprising, which sparked a generation of black resistance to apartheid, was remembered on its 15th anniversary Sunday by thousands of South Africans, from the mother of the first young victim to the leader of the African National Congress. In the treeless Avalon Cemetery of Soweto, Dorothy Pietersen and two dozen friends huddled early Sunday near the grave of her son, Hector Pietersen.
NEWS
May 12, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time in modern South African history, police turned their guns on right-wing whites Saturday, injuring two white farmers who were trying to demolish black squatter shacks. The unprecedented clash set up a tense, daylong confrontation on the dry farmlands outside this conservative town, 80 miles west of Johannesburg, between more than 100 heavily armed police and soldiers and an encampment of more than 500 angry right-wing farmers. It ended only after President Frederik W.
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