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NEWS
May 21, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the Bush Administration on Wednesday pressed for an end to violence in Thailand, U.S. officials have found that in the post-Cold War environment, there is not much Washington can do alone to influence events in Bangkok. Japan is now by far Thailand's largest supplier of foreign aid and investment. In 1990, Tokyo supplied about $419 million in grants and loans to Thailand, about 74% of Thailand's entire worldwide foreign aid.
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NEWS
May 23, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Political support for embattled Prime Minister Suchinda Kraprayoon collapsed Friday, with a coalition of five governing parties saying it now is prepared to replace him after this week's violent anti-government protests. Today, The Nation newspaper reported that Suchinda met with King Bhumibol Adulyadej on Friday night and agreed to resign.
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NEWS
May 20, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Groups of pro-democracy demonstrators pulled back from a confrontation with security forces late Tuesday, dispersing when troops fired in the air after two nights of running gun battles turned Bangkok's narrow streets into a war zone. In the third day of Bangkok violence, nations around the world sent warnings to Thailand's military government protesting the attacks on demonstrators. The United States assailed the Thai army's use of deadly force and suspended a joint U.S.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seated on a sidewalk next to an electric fan, Chalad Vorachat seems an unlikely choice for the martyr of Thai politics. A 49-year-old proprietor of provincial cable television networks, Chalad has been on a hunger strike since Suchinda Kraprayoon was appointed prime minister last month. Chalad vividly recalls his last meal, at 2 a.m. on April 8. "Fighting for democracy is more important than a life," he says matter-of-factly.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Political support for embattled Prime Minister Suchinda Kraprayoon collapsed Friday, with a coalition of five governing parties saying it now is prepared to replace him after this week's violent anti-government protests. Today, The Nation newspaper reported that Suchinda met with King Bhumibol Adulyadej on Friday night and agreed to resign.
NEWS
May 22, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Big Su is a murderer," said a pamphlet handed out in central Bangkok, using the newspaper nickname of Thai Prime Minister Suchinda Kraprayoon. A blood-soaked shrub wore a yellow sign that read: "The Tree of Democracy." Joss sticks burned in memory of the dead, and passers-by hung garlands of purple orchids on the shrub's broken branches. Mourners tied a black sash around the wide girth of the capital's Democracy Monument.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After four days of bloody political unrest, Thailand's revered monarch intervened in the nation's political crisis Wednesday night, prompting the government to release the imprisoned leader of pro-democracy forces, offer conditional amnesty for other protesters and agree to amend the constitution to end the turmoil. Pressure had been building throughout the day on Prime Minister Suchinda Kraprayoon, the target of the anti-government protests, to step aside or face a possible military takeover.
NEWS
May 22, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese officials stood tough Thursday against criticism that their response to recent military violence in Thailand was weak-kneed, defending their cautious policies as more effective in the long run than U.S.-style actions to quickly suspend aid. "Cutting off aid may destabilize the country and harm the people it was meant to help," a Foreign Ministry official said, adding that Japan needs to be extra careful with Thailand, since Tokyo provides 74% of Thailand's total foreign economic aid.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seated on a sidewalk next to an electric fan, Chalad Vorachat seems an unlikely choice for the martyr of Thai politics. A 49-year-old proprietor of provincial cable television networks, Chalad has been on a hunger strike since Suchinda Kraprayoon was appointed prime minister last month. Chalad vividly recalls his last meal, at 2 a.m. on April 8. "Fighting for democracy is more important than a life," he says matter-of-factly.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2010 | Tom Petruno, Market Beat
Despite an ever-growing list of crises threatening financial markets and the economy this spring, Wall Street bulls continued to cling to one great hope: U.S. employers were hiring again, and with job growth would come a sustainable economic recovery. The stock market's ugly reaction Friday to the disappointing May employment data tells you just how many investors and traders had been hanging on to that life preserver. With the Dow Jones industrials plummeting 323.31 points to 9,931.
NEWS
May 22, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Big Su is a murderer," said a pamphlet handed out in central Bangkok, using the newspaper nickname of Thai Prime Minister Suchinda Kraprayoon. A blood-soaked shrub wore a yellow sign that read: "The Tree of Democracy." Joss sticks burned in memory of the dead, and passers-by hung garlands of purple orchids on the shrub's broken branches. Mourners tied a black sash around the wide girth of the capital's Democracy Monument.
NEWS
May 22, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese officials stood tough Thursday against criticism that their response to recent military violence in Thailand was weak-kneed, defending their cautious policies as more effective in the long run than U.S.-style actions to quickly suspend aid. "Cutting off aid may destabilize the country and harm the people it was meant to help," a Foreign Ministry official said, adding that Japan needs to be extra careful with Thailand, since Tokyo provides 74% of Thailand's total foreign economic aid.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the Bush Administration on Wednesday pressed for an end to violence in Thailand, U.S. officials have found that in the post-Cold War environment, there is not much Washington can do alone to influence events in Bangkok. Japan is now by far Thailand's largest supplier of foreign aid and investment. In 1990, Tokyo supplied about $419 million in grants and loans to Thailand, about 74% of Thailand's entire worldwide foreign aid.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After four days of bloody political unrest, Thailand's revered monarch intervened in the nation's political crisis Wednesday night, prompting the government to release the imprisoned leader of pro-democracy forces, offer conditional amnesty for other protesters and agree to amend the constitution to end the turmoil. Pressure had been building throughout the day on Prime Minister Suchinda Kraprayoon, the target of the anti-government protests, to step aside or face a possible military takeover.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Groups of pro-democracy demonstrators pulled back from a confrontation with security forces late Tuesday, dispersing when troops fired in the air after two nights of running gun battles turned Bangkok's narrow streets into a war zone. In the third day of Bangkok violence, nations around the world sent warnings to Thailand's military government protesting the attacks on demonstrators. The United States assailed the Thai army's use of deadly force and suspended a joint U.S.
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