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April 1, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
More than 300 people suspected of taking part in anti-Chinese rioting have been arrested in Lhasa, the Tibetan capital, since the imposition of martial law there March 8, the city's mayor said Friday. "Some of them will be tried in public according to their crimes in the riots," Mayor Logya, who uses only the one name, said at a press conference here at the Great Hall of the People.
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NEWS
May 1, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
China announced the lifting of martial law in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa, nearly 14 months after restrictions were imposed to quell nationalist rioting. The announcement was carried by the official New China News Agency, but, because of the remoteness of Lhasa and a ban on most reporting there, it was impossible to verify.
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NEWS
March 13, 1989
Thousands of armed police and Chinese troops patrolled the riot-scarred streets of the Tibetan capital, checking identification cards and making arrests, sources in Lhasa said. Reached by telephone from Beijing, the sources said there was no overt evidence of anti-Chinese unrest in Lhasa as security forces maintained an iron grip on the city during its fifth day under martial law.
NEWS
September 14, 1989
Tibetan courts have sentenced 10 people to prison terms of up to life on charges of rioting and spying for the Dalai Lama during an anti-Chinese uprising in March, China's official New China News Agency reported. Among those sentenced were four former Tibetan monks who received terms ranging from three to five years, the news agency said.
NEWS
March 6, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Eleven people were killed and more than 100 others were injured in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa on Sunday in a clash between pro-independence protesters and police, according to an official Chinese news report. The incident began around noon when 13 Buddhist monks and nuns staged a protest march around central Lhasa's Jokhang Temple, carrying banners and shouting, "Independence for Tibet!" the official New China News Agency reported early today.
NEWS
March 7, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Pro-independence rioting rocked the Tibetan capital of Lhasa for a second day Monday, with angry crowds rampaging in the streets and security forces shooting demonstrators, killing at least one. Several thousand Tibetans took control of the old quarter of the city in the morning, according to Western tourists reached by telephone from Beijing. The protesters erected barricades near areas where a fierce clash Sunday left at least 11 dead.
NEWS
March 14, 1989 | From United Press International
Police detained 67 Tibetan exiles Monday after thay began an indefinite program of sit-ins outside foreign embassies demanding "immediate intervention" by the United Nations with China to "prevent further bloodshed in Tibet."
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
China announced the lifting of martial law in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa, nearly 14 months after restrictions were imposed to quell nationalist rioting. The announcement was carried by the official New China News Agency, but, because of the remoteness of Lhasa and a ban on most reporting there, it was impossible to verify.
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | Associated Press
China today gave its second account of a pro-independence demonstration in Lhasa, saying that foreigners were involved and that children were paid to stone police. Six people were killed in the demonstration Thursday in the Tibetan capital, according to the official New China News Agency. The agency disputed travelers' reports that Chinese police fired on the protesters. It blamed the violence on the Dalai Lama, the Tibetans' spiritual leader.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer,
Police opened fire Saturday on anti-Chinese protesters in Lhasa, apparently killing at least three demonstrators and injuring a foreign tourist, Westerners in the Tibetan capital said. The pro-independence protest outside central Lhasa's Jokhang Temple was timed to coincide with worldwide celebrations marking the 40th anniversary of the U.N. Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It was the third such protest in little more than a year to be suppressed with bloodshed.
NEWS
August 8, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Ten people accused of joining in pro-independence rioting in Tibet in March have been sentenced to prison, the People's Daily said Monday. The sentences, issued July 29, are for three years or less, the Communist Party newspaper said. The three days of violent anti-Chinese protests in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa left 16 people dead and 100 injured.
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
More than 300 people suspected of taking part in anti-Chinese rioting have been arrested in Lhasa, the Tibetan capital, since the imposition of martial law there March 8, the city's mayor said Friday. "Some of them will be tried in public according to their crimes in the riots," Mayor Logya, who uses only the one name, said at a press conference here at the Great Hall of the People.
NEWS
March 14, 1989 | From United Press International
Police detained 67 Tibetan exiles Monday after thay began an indefinite program of sit-ins outside foreign embassies demanding "immediate intervention" by the United Nations with China to "prevent further bloodshed in Tibet."
NEWS
March 11, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
A massive military and police presence, together with clear warnings that demonstrations would be crushed, brought an enforced calm to the Tibetan capital of Lhasa on Friday. A string of 72 vehicles carrying more than 1,200 troops drove through the streets of Lhasa in the morning in a show of force, according to the official China News Service. The report said the convoy included 42 military trucks, 10 vehicles with "automatic rocket guns" and 20 command cars.
NEWS
March 10, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Virtually all foreigners were expelled from the Tibetan capital of Lhasa on Thursday as about 60,000 troops and police intensified a martial-law crackdown against pro-independence protesters. "Soldiers are all over the place and they're grabbing everyone," said a frightened Tibetan woman who spoke by telephone with an Associated Press reporter in Beijing.
NEWS
March 8, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
China declared martial law in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa on Tuesday as the most serious pro-independence rioting in decades entered a third day. Thousands of Chinese soldiers began taking control of the city shortly after midnight, according to Western witnesses and the official New China News Agency. "Troops have been deployed in designated places," the news agency reported, quoting Maj. Gen. Zhang Shaosong, political commissar of the Tibet Regional Military Command.
NEWS
August 8, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Ten people accused of joining in pro-independence rioting in Tibet in March have been sentenced to prison, the People's Daily said Monday. The sentences, issued July 29, are for three years or less, the Communist Party newspaper said. The three days of violent anti-Chinese protests in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa left 16 people dead and 100 injured.
NEWS
March 7, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Pro-independence rioting rocked the Tibetan capital of Lhasa for a second day Monday, with angry crowds rampaging in the streets and security forces shooting demonstrators, killing at least one. Several thousand Tibetans took control of the old quarter of the city in the morning, according to Western tourists reached by telephone from Beijing. The protesters erected barricades near areas where a fierce clash Sunday left at least 11 dead.
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