Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRiots Venezuela
IN THE NEWS

Riots Venezuela

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 3, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Shaken by four days of bloody price riots that left more than 200 dead and thousands injured, Venezuelan President Carlos Andres Perez vowed Thursday to stick to the tough austerity measures that triggered the violence and called on the industrial nations to work out "decent and rational" debt arrangements with Latin America before more such social explosions occur.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 10, 1989
Venezuela restored some civil liberties, including the right to hold public protests, that were suspended Feb. 28 to quell nationwide price riots that claimed more than 250 lives. Soldiers will continue to patrol main avenues in Caracas, the capital, and in other cities until "the situation is totally normalized," government information director Pastor Heydra said. Restored liberties include press freedom, the right to gather in public and the right to travel inside and outside of Venezuela.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 4, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
President Carlos Andres Perez on Friday characterized the bloody price riots that took more than 300 lives in this once tranquil and wealthy nation as a largely spontaneous and nonpolitical outburst of the poor against the rich. He blamed Venezuela's foreign-debt crisis for creating the conditions that sparked the violence.
NEWS
March 4, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
President Carlos Andres Perez on Friday characterized the bloody price riots that took more than 300 lives in this once tranquil and wealthy nation as a largely spontaneous and nonpolitical outburst of the poor against the rich. He blamed Venezuela's foreign-debt crisis for creating the conditions that sparked the violence.
NEWS
March 6, 1989
The Venezuelan government ordered some schools to reopen and declared that the nation has "returned to complete normality" after the bloodiest riots in decades. Authorities, however, did not lift a night curfew in the capital or a state of martial law. The rioting, which began Feb. 27, was sparked by price increases under a government austerity plan. Meanwhile, the government revised the casualty toll, reporting 246 people killed--down from an earlier estimate of at least 300.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
government suspended constitutional rights Tuesday and imposed a nationwide curfew as riots over price increases ravaged Venezuela for a second day and looting spread. President Carlos Andres Perez appealed on television for an end to the "incredible tragedy," which, according to police estimates, has killed up to 50 people and injured 500. Even as Perez spoke, gunfire was heard in the streets, and rioting and looting continued in the worst violence in 30 years of democratic rule.
NEWS
March 2, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Sporadic armed clashes in the shantytown slums of this modern but wreckage-strewn city took another dozen lives Wednesday as the government of President Carlos Andres Perez, already in a state of virtual martial law, announced pay raises and other economic measures to end three days of bloody riots. Since the rioting and looting erupted Monday in response to sharp increases in gasoline prices and bus fares, at least 200 people have died in eight Venezuelan cities, unofficial surveys showed.
NEWS
February 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
Angry mobs across Venezuela set fire to cars and buses, battled police and guardsmen and looted hundreds of stores Monday to protest stiff increases in gasoline prices and transportation fares. The riots injured at least 200 people in Caracas and the Guarenas shantytown 30 miles east of the capital, a police report said. There was also an unconfirmed report of a fatality.
NEWS
March 3, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Shaken by four days of bloody price riots that left more than 200 dead and thousands injured, Venezuelan President Carlos Andres Perez vowed Thursday to stick to the tough austerity measures that triggered the violence and called on the industrial nations to work out "decent and rational" debt arrangements with Latin America before more such social explosions occur.
NEWS
March 2, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Sporadic armed clashes in the shantytown slums of this modern but wreckage-strewn city took another dozen lives Wednesday as the government of President Carlos Andres Perez, already in a state of virtual martial law, announced pay raises and other economic measures to end three days of bloody riots. Since the rioting and looting erupted Monday in response to sharp increases in gasoline prices and bus fares, at least 200 people have died in eight Venezuelan cities, unofficial surveys showed.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
government suspended constitutional rights Tuesday and imposed a nationwide curfew as riots over price increases ravaged Venezuela for a second day and looting spread. President Carlos Andres Perez appealed on television for an end to the "incredible tragedy," which, according to police estimates, has killed up to 50 people and injured 500. Even as Perez spoke, gunfire was heard in the streets, and rioting and looting continued in the worst violence in 30 years of democratic rule.
NEWS
February 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
Angry mobs across Venezuela set fire to cars and buses, battled police and guardsmen and looted hundreds of stores Monday to protest stiff increases in gasoline prices and transportation fares. The riots injured at least 200 people in Caracas and the Guarenas shantytown 30 miles east of the capital, a police report said. There was also an unconfirmed report of a fatality.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|